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AbstractFull Text

Pet poisoning is most common with human drugs and over-the-counter drugs, veterinary drugs, insecticides, rodenticides, household chemicals, fertilizers and houseplants. Another important source is poisoning with human foods that may be toxic for dogs and cats. Different foods that are not harmful...

Author(s)
Crnić, A. P.; Šantek, E.; Šuran, J.
Publisher
Hrvatski veterinarski institut, Centar za peradarstvo, Zagreb, Croatia
Citation
Veterinarska Stanica, 2018, 49, 2, pp 117-122
Abstract

In this second article more toxic plants are discussed and a table of other potentially toxic plants is provided for reference. Poisoning with Allium species, including onions and garlic, is characterised by Heinz body anaemia in both cats and dogs. Conkers and acorns are commonly eaten in the...

Author(s)
Bates, N.
Publisher
MA Healthcare Limited, London, UK
Citation
Companion Animal, 2018, 23, 10, pp 558-568
AbstractFull Text

The aim of this study was to describe the major agents involved in small animal poisoning, the causative agent, poisoning route, time to search veterinary care, clinical signs and ancillary tests of canine and feline patients treated at the Veterinary Medical Teaching Hospital from January 2010 to...

Author(s)
Zang, L.; Bing, R. S.; Araujo, A. C. P. de; Ferreira, M. P.
Publisher
Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Sul, Faculdade de Veterinária, Porto Alegre, Brazil
Citation
Acta Scientiae Veterinariae, 2018, 46, pp 1584
Abstract

Every day, companion animals are exposed to numerous household products including food for humans. These products are safe for people but can be dangerous and severely toxic to pets. Among the most dangerous dog poisons are: chocolate, onions, garlic, xylitol, grapes and dried raisins. Since 1998,...

Author(s)
Sapierzyński, R.; Wojtczak, M.; Filich, M.
Publisher
Krajowa Izba Lekarsko Weterynaryjna, Warszawa, Poland
Citation
Życie Weterynaryjne, 2018, 93, 6, pp 411-413
Abstract

Several foods that are perfectly suitable for human consumption can be toxic to dogs and cats. Food-associated poisoning cases involving the accidental ingestion of chocolate and chocolate-based products, Allium spp. (onion, garlic, leek, and chives), macadamia nuts, Vitis vinifera fruits (grapes,...

Author(s)
Cortinovis, C.; Caloni, F.
Publisher
Frontiers Media S.A., Lausanne, Switzerland
Citation
Frontiers in Veterinary Science, 2016, 3, March, pp 26
Abstract

Introduction: The purpose of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effect of hydrogen on the therapy of onion poisoned dogs. Material and Methods: A total of 16 adult beagle dogs were divided into two groups (control and hydrogen) and all were fed dehydrated onion powder at the dose of 10...

Author(s)
Zhao JingHua; Zhang Ming; Li Yue; Zhang ZhiHeng; Chen MingZi; Liu Tao; Zhang JianTao; Shan AnShan
Publisher
De Gruyter Open, Warsaw, Poland
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Research, 2017, 61, 4, pp 527-533
AbstractFull Text

Following previous work in which we described poisoning with food and food additives: chocolate, coffee, grapes, macadamia nuts, onions and garlic, xylitol and salt this paper described the poisoning with the most common central nervous system depressants (marijuana, barbiturates, opioids, "club"...

Author(s)
Prevendar Crnić, A.; Šuran, J.
Publisher
Hrvatski veterinarski institut, Centar za peradarstvo, Zagreb, Croatia
Citation
Veterinarska Stanica, 2020, 51, 1, pp 93-100
AbstractFull Text

Following a previous study which described poisoning with chocolate, coffee, grapes, macadamia nuts, onions and garlic, this paper described poisoning in dogs with the natural sweetener xylitol and sodium chloride (salt). It has been found that in dogs, contrary to humans, intravenous...

Author(s)
Crnić, A. P.; Šantek, E.; Šuran, J.
Publisher
Hrvatski veterinarski institut, Centar za peradarstvo, Zagreb, Croatia
Citation
Veterinarska Stanica, 2019, 50, 6, pp 565-573
Abstract

Pet animals are closer to their owners and for this reason erroneously share the same alimentation. Several substances can cause intoxication or poisoning in dogs and cats, being many of those also found in human food. Some foods that are edible for humans or even to other animal species can be...

Author(s)
Giannico, A. T.; Ponczek, C. A. C.; Jesus, A. S. de; Melchert, A.; Guimarães-Okamoto, P. T. C.
Publisher
Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Sao Paulo, Brazil
Citation
Colloquium Agrariae, 2014, 10, 1, pp 69-86
Abstract

The mechanism of hemolysis induced by onion poisoning in dogs was studied. Six adult, clinically normal Pekingese dogs were fed cooked onions at 30 g/kg body weight/day for 2 days. Blood samples were collected on days 1, 3, 5, 8, 12, 18 and 24 after onion administration, and urine was collected the ...

Author(s)
Tang, X.; Xia, Z.; Yu, J.
Publisher
Blackwell Publishing, Oxford, UK
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Pharmacology and Therapeutics, 2008, 31, 2, pp 143-149

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