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Abstract

Hendra virus is a zoonotic paramyxovirus, which causes severe respiratory and neurological disease in horses and humans. Since 2012, the Hendra virus sub-unit G vaccine has been available for horse vaccination in Australia. Uptake of the vaccine has been limited and spill-over events of Hendra ...

Author(s)
Goyen, K. A.; Wright, J. D.; Cunneen, A.; Henning, J.
Publisher
Public Library of Sciences (PLoS), San Francisco, USA
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2017, 12, 6, pp e0180062
Abstract

Hendra virus causes sporadic zoonotic disease in Australia following spill over from flying foxes to horses and from horses to people. Prevention and risk mitigation strategies such as vaccination of horses or biosecurity and property management measures are widely publicised, but hinge on...

Author(s)
Wiethoelter, A. K.; Sawford, K.; Schembri, N.; Taylor, M. R.; Dhand, N. K.; Moloney, B.; Wright, T.; Kung, N.; Field, H. E.; Toribio, J. A. L. M. L.
Publisher
Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Preventive Veterinary Medicine, 2017, 140, pp 67-77
Abstract

Background: Hendra virus is a paramyxovirus that causes periodic serious disease and fatalities in horses and humans in Australia first identified in 1994. Pteropid bats (commonly known as flying-foxes) are the natural host of the virus, and the putative route of infection in horses is by ingestion ...

Author(s)
Manyweathers, J.; Field, H.; Longnecker, N.; Agho, K.; Smith, C.; Taylor, M.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
BMC Veterinary Research, 2017, 13, 103, pp (13 April 2017)
Abstract

Hendra virus was identified in horses and humans in 1994, in Queensland, Australia. Flying foxes are the natural host. Horses are thought to acquire infection by direct or indirect contact with infected flying fox urine. Humans are infected from close contact with infected horses. To reduce risk of ...

Author(s)
Manyweathers, J.; Field, H.; Jordan, D.; Longnecker, N.; Agho, K.; Smith, C.; Taylor, M.
Publisher
Wiley, Berlin, Germany
Citation
Transboundary and Emerging Diseases, 2017, 64, 6, pp 1898-1911
Abstract

Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic novel paramyxovirus causing sporadic fatal infection in horses and humans in Australia. Species of fruit-bats (genus Pteropus), commonly known as flying-foxes, are the natural host of the virus. We undertook a survey of horse owners in the states of Queensland...

Author(s)
Kung, N.; McLaughlin, A.; Taylor, M.; Moloney, B.; Wright, T.; Field, H.
Publisher
Australian Veterinary Association (N.S.W) Division, Artarmon, Australia
Citation
Australian Equine Veterinarian, 2014, 33, 1, pp 59-67
Abstract

Objective: To evaluate the effect of Equivac® HeV Hendra virus vaccine on Thoroughbred racing performance. Design: Retrospective pre-post intervention study. Methods: Thoroughbreds with at least one start at one of six major south-eastern Queensland race tracks between 1 July 2012 and 31 December...

Author(s)
Schemann, K.; Annand, E. J.; Reid, P. A.; Lenz, M. F.; Thomson, P. C.; Dhand, N. K.
Publisher
Wiley, Melbourne, Australia
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 2018, 96, 4, pp 132-141
Abstract

Understanding infection dynamics in animal hosts is fundamental to managing spillover and emergence of zoonotic infections. Hendra virus is endemic in Australian pteropodid bat populations and can be lethal to horses and humans. However, we know little about the factors driving Hendra virus...

Author(s)
Páez, D. J.; Giles, J.; McCallum, H.; Field, H.; Jordan, D.; Peel, A. J.; Plowright, R. K.
Publisher
Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK
Citation
Epidemiology and Infection, 2017, 145, 15, pp 3143-3153
Abstract

Bats of the genus Pteropus (Pteropodidae), colloquially known as flying foxes, are recognized as the natural reservoir of Hendra virus, a zoonotic paramyxovirus responsible for mortality in horses and humans. Some previous studies have suggested that physiologic and ecologic factors promote Hendra ...

Author(s)
McMichael, L.; Edson, D.; Mayer, D.; Broos, A.; Kopp, S.; Meers, J.; Field, H.
Publisher
Wildlife Disease Association, Lawrence, USA
Citation
Journal of Wildlife Diseases, 2017, 53, 1, pp 111-120
Abstract

Hendra virus is a highly pathogenic novel paramyxovirus causing sporadic fatal infection in horses and humans in Australia. Species of fruit-bats (genus Pteropus), commonly known as flying-foxes, are the natural host of the virus. We undertook a survey of horse owners in the states of Queensland...

Author(s)
Kung, N.; McLaughlin, A.; Taylor, M.; Moloney, B.; Wright, T.; Field, H.
Publisher
Public Library of Sciences (PLoS), San Francisco, USA
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2013, 8, 11, pp e80897
Abstract

In recent years, outbreaks of exotic as well as newly emerging infectious diseases have highlighted the importance of biosecurity for the Australian horse industry. As the first potentially fatal zoonosis transmissible from horses to humans in Australia, Hendra virus has emphasised the need to...

Author(s)
Wiethoelter, A. K.; Schembri, N.; Dhand, N. K.; Sawford, K.; Taylor, M. R.; Moloney, B.; Wright, T.; Kung NiNa; Field, H. E.; Toribio, J. A. L. M. L.
Publisher
Elsevier B.V., Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Preventive Veterinary Medicine, 2017, 148, pp 28-36

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