Cookies on VetMed Resource

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

 

Continuing to use www.cabi.org  means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

VetMed Resource

Veterinary information to support practice, based on evidence and continuing education

Sign up to receive our Veterinary & Animal Sciences e-newsletter, book alerts and offers direct to your inbox.

Results per page:

Search results

Abstract

The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of ephedrine administered prior to induction of anesthesia on the onset time of succinylcholine for endotracheal intubation in cats. Cats were randomly assigned to receive either 70 µg kg-1 of ephedrine (Group I; n=7) or saline (Group II; n=7) 3...

Author(s)
Saglam, K.; Tas, A.
Publisher
Medwell Online, Faisalabad, Pakistan
Citation
Journal of Animal and Veterinary Advances, 2011, 10, 9, pp 1184-1186
Abstract

Pressure within the urethra was reduced by i.v. injection of suxamethonium at 0.075 mg/kg and by dantrolene sodium at 1 mg/kg, but not by diazepam.

Author(s)
Sträter-Knowlen, I.
Publisher
Tierärztliche Hochschule, Hannover, Germany
Citation
The effects of muscle relaxants on the urethral pressure profile in healthy cats and in cats with obstructive lower urinary tract disease., 1994, pp 85 pp.
Abstract

Suxamethonium is a useful muscle relaxant in veterinary anaesthesia and is rapidly hydrolysed by plasma cholinesterase, an enzyme that decreases in cats wearing dichlorvos flea collars. Suxamethonium was injected intravenously at 0.1 mg/kg into 8 cats in Australia; 7 of the cats were then fitted...

Author(s)
Reynolds, W. T.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Journal, 1985, 62, 3, pp 106-107
Abstract

A study was performed to estimate the minimum dose rate of suxamethonium to produce paralysis of the intrinsic muscles of the larynx for endotracheal intubation in the cat anaesthetised with Saffan. From these observations the dose suggested is 0.2 mg/kg.

Author(s)
Reynolds, W. T.; Keates, H. L.
Citation
Australian Veterinary Practitioner, 1988, 18, 2, pp 66-67
Abstract

Effects of the neuromuscular blocking agent succinylcholine (n = 9), the centrally acting skeletal muscle relaxant diazepam (n = 11), and the directing skeletal muscle relaxant dantrolene sodium (n = 8) on the urethral pressure profile were evaluated in anaesthetized, healthy, sexually intact,...

Author(s)
Straeter-Knowlen, I. M.; Marks, S. L.; Speth, R. C.; Wirth, W.; Knowlen, G. G.
Citation
American Journal of Veterinary Research, 1994, 55, 12, pp 1739-1744
Abstract

Author(s)
Thiagarajah, S.; Sophie, S.; Lear, E.; Azar, I.; Frost, E. A. M.
Citation
British Journal of Anaesthesia, 1988, 60, 2, pp 157-160
Abstract

Propofol was administered to 49 cats to induce anaesthesia. The mean dose required was 6.8 mg/kg and this was not affected by prior administration of acepromazine maleate. In 27 cases, propofol was also used as the principal maintenance agent (mean dose rate 0.51 mg/kg/minute). Inductions were very ...

Author(s)
Brearley, J. C.; Kellagher, R. E. B.; Hall, L. W.
Citation
Journal of Small Animal Practice, 1988, 29, 5, pp 315-322
Abstract

Author(s)
Sträter, I. M.; Knowlen, G. G.; Speth, R. C.; Marks, S. L.
Citation
Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine, 1992, 6, 2, pp 140
Abstract

Author(s)
Silveira, A. K. da
Citation
Arquivos Fluminenses de Medicina Veterinária, 1986, 1, 2, pp 50
Abstract

Atropine and thiopentone had no significant effect on the laryngeal reflex in anaesthetized and decerebrate cats. Suxamethonium prevented laryngospasm by paralyzing the intrinsic laryngeal muscles. The use of local analgesic sprays in the pharynx and larynx caused a considerable reduction in the...

Author(s)
Rex, M. A. E.
Citation
Brit. J. Anaesth., 1971, 43, pp 117-121

Refine Results

Sort Order
Author
Geographical Location
Item Type
Language
Organisms
Subject Topics

Datasheet Filter