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CABI Book Chapter

One Health: the theory and practice of integrated health approaches.

Book cover for One Health: the theory and practice of integrated health approaches.

Description

The One Health concept of combined veterinary and human health continues to gain momentum, but the supporting literature is sparse. In this book, the origins of the concept are examined, and practical content on methodological tools, data gathering, monitoring techniques, study designs, and mathematical models is included. Zoonotic diseases, with discussions of diseases of wildlife, farm animals, ...

Chapter 3 (Page no: 26)

The human-animal relationship in the law.

This chapter provides an overall introduction to the human-animal relationship in the law, as the prevailing distinction between human and animal health is grounded within the general legal distinction between animals and humans. It provides an overview of national provisions concerning animals in constitutional law, private law and animal welfare law, and introduces a selection of international agreements and organizations that affect animal welfare. It is concluded that greater importance should be attached to animal welfare issues as part of the One Health concept. The One Health approach is a compelling reason to strengthen animal welfare laws with the purpose of enhancing both animal and, consequently, human health. Although the aim to recognize the linkage between human and animal health does not inevitably question the overall legal boundary between animals and humans, the One Health concept does challenge current legislation.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) One Health in history. Author(s): Bresalier, M. Cassidy, A. Woods, A.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 16) Theoretical issues of One Health. Author(s): Zinsstag, J. Waltner-Toews, D. Tanner, M.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 38) One Health: an ecological and conservation perspective. Author(s): Cumming, D. H. M. Cumming, G. S.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 53) Measuring added value from integrated methods. Author(s): Zinsstag, J. Mahamat, M. B. Schelling, E.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 60) The role of social sciences in One Health - reciprocal benefits. Author(s): Whittaker, M.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 73) The role of human-animal interactions in education. Author(s): Hediger, K. Beetz, A.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 85) Integrated risk assessment - foodborne diseases. Author(s): Racloz, V. Waltner-Toews, D. Stärk, K. D. C.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 96) A One Health perspective for integrated human and animal sanitation and nutrient recycling. Author(s): Hung Nguyen-viet Phuc Pham-duc Vi Nguyen Tanner, M. Odermatt, P. Tu Vu-van Hoang Van Minh Zurbrügg, C. Schelling, E. Zinsstag, J.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 107) One Health study designs. Author(s): Schelling, E. Hattendorf, J.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 122) Animal-human transmission models. Author(s): Zinsstag, J. Fuhrimann, S. Hattendorf, J. Chitnis, N.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 134) One Health economics. Author(s): Zinsstag, J. Choudhury, A. Roth, F. Shaw, A.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 146) Integrated human and animal demographic surveillance. Author(s): Jean-Richard, V. Crump, L.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 153) Brucellosis surveillance and control: a case for One Health. Author(s): Zinsstag, J. Dean, A. Baljinnyam, Z. Roth, F. Kasymbekov, J. Schelling, E.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 163) Bovine tuberculosis at the human-livestock-wildlife interface in sub-Saharan Africa. Author(s): Tschopp, R.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 176) Integrated rabies control. Author(s): Léchenne, M. Miranda, M. E. Zinsstag, J.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 190) Leptospirosis: development of a national One Health control programme in Fiji. Author(s): Reid, S. Kama, M.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 201) Human and animal African trypanosomiasis. Author(s): Welburn, S. C. Coleman, P.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 222) Non-communicable diseases: how can companion animals help in connection with coronary heart disease, obesity, diabetes and depression? Author(s): Turner, D. C.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 230) Integrated One Health services. Author(s): Schelling, E. Mahamat, M. B. Zinsstag, J. Tanner, M.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 243) Beyond fences: wildlife, livestock and land use in Southern Africa. Author(s): Cumming, D. H. M. Osofsky, S. A. Atkinson, S. J. Atkinson, M. W.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 258) Better together: identifying the benefits of a closer integration between plant health, agriculture and One Health. Author(s): Boa, E. Danielsen, S. Haesen, S.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 272) Food security, nutrition and the One Health nexus. Author(s): Mahamat, M. B. Crump, L. Tidjani, A. Jaeger, F. Ibrahim, A. Bonfoh, B.
Chapter: 24 (Page no: 283) One Health into action: integrating Global Health Governance with national priorities in a globalized world. Author(s): Okello, A. Vandersmissen, A. Welburn, S. C.
Chapter: 25 (Page no: 304) One Health in policy development: an integrated approach to translating science into policy. Author(s): Cork, S. C. Geale, D. W. Hall, D. C.
Chapter: 26 (Page no: 318) Evolution of the One Health movement in the USA. Author(s): Rubin, C. S. Kunkel, R. Grigg, C. King, L.
Chapter: 27 (Page no: 332) Institutional research capacity development for integrated approaches in developing countries: an example from Vietnam. Author(s): Hung Nguyen Viet Vi Nguyen Phuc Pham Duc Le Vu Anh Phung Dac Cam Tanner, M. Grace, D. Zurbrügg, C. Tran Thi Tuyet Hanh Tu Vu Van Luu Quoc Toan Dang Xuan Sinh Pham Thi Huong Giang Zinsstag, J.
Chapter: 28 (Page no: 341) Enabling academic One Health environments. Author(s): Buntain, B. Allen-Scott, L. North, M. Rock, M. Hatfield, J.
Chapter: 29 (Page no: 357) Individual and institutional capacity building in global health research in Africa. Author(s): Bonfoh, B. Mahamat, M. B. Schelling, E. Ouattara, K. Cailleau, A. Haydon, D. Cleaveland, S. Zinsstag, J. Tanner, M.
Chapter: 30 (Page no: 366) Transdisciplinary research and One Health. Author(s): Schelling, E. Zinsstag, J.
Chapter: 31 (Page no: 374) Operationalizing One Health for local governance. Author(s): Meisser, A. Goldblum, A. L.
Chapter: 32 (Page no: 385) Non-governmental organizations in One Health. Author(s): Stephen, C. Waltner-Toews, D.
Chapter: 33 (Page no: 397) Toward a healthy concept of health. Author(s): Houle, K. L. F. Cooke, K. T.
Chapter: 34 (Page no: 415) Grappling with complexity: the context for One Health and the ecohealth approach. Author(s): Bunch, M. J. Waltner-Toews, D.
Chapter: 35 (Page no: 427) Summary and outlook for practical use of One Health. Author(s): Zinsstag, J. Tanner, M.

Chapter details