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Improving lives by solving problems in agriculture and the environment

89 results found

Action on Invasives
Increased global trade has an unfortunate side effect – the rapid spread of invasive species. Imported plants, insects and pathogens can all have an adverse impact on human, animal, agricultural and environmental health.  Invasive species are estimated to cost the global economy over US$1.4...
Invasive species data
Invasive species are the biggest driving force of species extinction after habitat loss, overexploitation and pollution. Currently there is little easily accessible knowledge on the role of invasive species and their management in order to prevent or slow the decline of species. Taking the USA as...
Managing invasive rubbervine in Brazil
Rubbervine, Cryptostegia madagascariensis (common name: devil’s claw) is a serious invasive weed. Hailing from Madagascar, it was introduced to Brazil as an ornamental plant but has since invaded the semi-arid northeastern region of the country, especially the unique Caatinga ecosystem. Rubbervine...
Controlling pest pear in Laikipia
Communities in northern Kenya are heavily dependent on livestock. In this semi-arid region, pastoralists rely on cattle, goats and sheep as a source of income and struggle with frequent drought and poor pasture. A non-native cactus, Opuntia stricta, has invaded the limited amount of good grazing...
Managing invasive species in selected forest ecosystems of South East Asia
Invasive alien species (IAS) are, after habitat destruction, the second biggest threat to biodiversity worldwide. Invasive alien species are significantly affecting local and global biodiversity in South East Asia, invading and threatening forest habitats and the species that live in them. They are...
Finding a biocontrol for Himalayan raspberry
Rubus ellipticus var. obcordatus, or yellow Himalayan raspberry, is regarded as one of the world’s 100 worst invasive species and is a major threat to native Hawaiian forests. A single plant can grow into a 4m tall impenetrable thicket, with its main stem exceeding 10cm thick. Its prickles and...
Toolkits for invasive plants in East Africa
Many exotic plants introduced to East Africa have subsequently escaped cultivation and become naturalized and/ or invasive reducing biodiversity and negatively impacting livelihoods. Invasive alien plants out-compete indigenous species, often resulting in serious changes to the structure and...
Measuring the livelihood impacts of invasive alien species in East Africa
Invasive alien plant species have a negative impact on biodiversity and the rural communities who depend on the natural resources around them for their survival. Although a lot is known about the biodiversity impacts of these introduced species, little is known about the livelihood impacts that...
Controlling wild ginger
Many species in the Zingiberaceae family have been widely used throughout history. Root ginger for instance, has been cultivated across Asia both for its medicinal and its culinary properties. The genus Hedychium however has long been used as an ornamental plant due to its heady perfume and...
Controlling floating pennywort in a safe and sustainable way
Floating pennywort, Hydrocotyle ranunculoides, is a strong contender for the title of worst aquatic weed in the UK. Originating from Central and South America, the plant arrived in the UK in the late 1980's as an oxygenating ornamental plant for the aquatic trade. It didn't take long however, for...