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Nutrition and Food Sciences

Nutrition and food science information across the food chain supporting academic and industrial research

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Abstract

High fructose corn syrup (HFCS)-associated health problems have raised concerns. We investigated the effects of HFCS-containing drinking water on body fat, intestinal microbiota structure of mice, and the relationships between them. HFCS drinking water significantly increased body fat content and...

Author(s)
Wang XiaoRong; Zhu LiYing; Li XiaoQiong; Wang Xin; Hao RuiRong; Li JinJun
Publisher
Nature Publishing Group, London, UK
Citation
npj Science of Food, 2022, 6, 17,
AbstractFull Text

Increased hepatic lipid content and decreased insulin sensitivity have critical roles in the development of cardiometabolic diseases. Therefore, our objective was to investigate the dose-response effects of consuming high fructose corn syrup (HFCS)-sweetened beverages for two weeks on hepatic lipid ...

Author(s)
Sigala, D. M.; Hieronimus, B.; Medici, V.; Lee, V.; Nunez, M. V.; Bremer, A. A.; Cox, C. L.; Price, C. A.; Benyam, Y.; Abdelhafez, Y.; McGahan, J. P.; Keim, N. L.; Goran, M. I.; Pacini, G.; Tura, A.; Sirlin, C. B.; Chaudhari, A. J.; Havel, P. J.; Stanhope, K. L.
Publisher
MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland
Citation
Nutrients, 2022, 14, 8,
Abstract

Adolescence is a critical period of development, during which the brain undergoes rapid maturation. Problematically, adolescents are the top consumers of high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) sweetened beverages and snacks, which may have neurodevelopmental consequences. While HFCS consumption has been...

Author(s)
Maya-Romero, A. M.; Dodd, G. E.; Landin, J. D.; Zaremba, H. K.; Allen, O. F.; Bilbow, M. A.; Hammaker, R. D.; Santerre-Anderson, J. L.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Behavioural Brain Research, 2022, 419,
News Article

Study adds to growing evidence of the dangers of high fructose consumption

Date
24 February 2021
Abstract

Carbohydrates are macronutrients that serve as energy sources. Many studies have shown that carbohydrate intake is nonlinearly associated with mortality. Moreover, high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS) consumption is positively associated with obesity, cardiovascular disease, and type 2 diabetes mellitus ...

Author(s)
Iizuka, K.
Publisher
MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland
Citation
International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 2021, 22, 21,
Abstract

Context: Studies in rodents and humans suggest that high-fructose corn syrup (HFCS)-sweetened diets promote greater metabolic dysfunction than sucrose-sweetened diets. Objective To compare the effects of consuming sucrose-sweetened beverage (SB), HFCS-SB, or a control beverage sweetened with...

Author(s)
Sigala, D. M.; Hieronimus, B.; Medici, V.; Lee, V.; Nunez, M. V.; Bremer, A. A.; Cox, C. L.; Price, C. A.; Benyam, Y.; Chaudhari, A. J.; Abdelhafez, Y.; McGahan, J. P.; Goran, M. I.; Sirlin, C. B.; Pacini, G.; Tura, A.; Keim, N. L.; Havel, P. J.; Stanhope, K. L.
Publisher
Oxford University Press, Cary, USA
Citation
Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, 2021, 106, 11, pp 3248-3264
Abstract

Fructose consumption is linked to the rising incidence of obesity and cancer, which are two of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality globally. Dietary fructose metabolism begins at the epithelium of the small intestine, where fructose is transported by glucose transporter type 5 (GLUT5;...

Author(s)
Taylor, S. R.; Ramsamooj, S.; Liang, R. J.; Katti, A.; Pozovskiy, R.; Vasan, N.; Hwang SeoKyoung; Nahiyaan, N.; Francoeur, N. J.; Schatoff, E. M.; Johnson, J. L.; Shah, M. A.; Dannenberg, A. J.; Sebra, R. P.; Dow, L. E.; Cantley, L. C.; Rhee, K. Y.; Goncalves, M. D.
Publisher
Nature Publishing Group, London, UK
Citation
Nature (London), 2021, 597, 7875, pp 263-267
Abstract

Fructose consumption has been linked with metabolic syndrome and obesity. Fructose-based sweeteners like high fructose corn syrup taste sweeter, improve food palatability, and are increasingly prevalent in our diet. The increase in fructose consumption precedes the rise in obesity and is a...

Author(s)
Payant, M. A.; Chee, M. J.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Neuroscience and Biobehavioral Reviews, 2021, 128, pp 346-357
Abstract

This study investigated whether swimming protocol induces adaptations to sex-specific oxidative stress and Nrf2/Keap-1 pathway in the liver of mice fed a high-calorie diet (HCD) during the early life period. Male and female Swiss mice were fed a standard or high-calorie (enriched with 20% lard and...

Author(s)
Jardim, N. S.; Müller, S. G.; Nogueira, C. W.
Publisher
Wiley, Copenhagen, Denmark
Citation
Cell Biochemistry and Function, 2021, 39, 5, pp 646-657
Abstract

High-fructose syrups are used as sugar substitutes due to their physical and functional properties. High fructose corn syrup (HFCS) is used in bakery products, dairy products, breakfast cereals and beverages, but it has been reported that there might be a direct relationship between high fructose...

Author(s)
Khorshidian, N.; Shadnoush, M.; Khajavi, M. Z.; Sohrabvandi, S.; Yousefi, M.; Mortazavian, A. M.
Publisher
Taylor & Francis, Abingdon, UK
Citation
International Journal of Food Sciences and Nutrition, 2021, 72, 5, pp 592-614

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