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Abstract

This study combines routinely collected water quality data from Ireland and an on-site survey of waterway users to evaluate whether trip duration is responsive to changes in water quality. Four categories of recreational users are considered: anglers, boaters, other water sports (e.g. rowing, ...

Author(s)
Breen, B.; Curtis, J.; Hynes, S.
Publisher
Taylor & Francis, Abingdon, UK
Citation
Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, 2018, 7, 1, pp 1-15
Abstract

In Europe, the quality of coastal bathing waters improved considerably in the last decades, mainly due to the more demanding legislation and the adoption of water sanitation plans. In the Nerbioi estuary (North Spain), the Wastewater Treatment Plan implemented between 1990 and 2001 resulted on an...

Author(s)
Pouso, S.; Uyarra, M. C.; Borja, Á.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Environmental Management, 2018, 212, pp 450-461
Abstract

When beach water monitoring programs identify poor water quality, the causes are frequently unknown. We hypothesize that management policies play an important role in the frequency of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) exceedances (enterococci and fecal coliform) at recreational beaches. To test this...

Author(s)
Kelly, E. A.; Feng ZhiXuan; Gidley, M. L.; Sinigalliano, C. D.; Naresh Kumar; Donahue, A. G.; Reniers, A. J. H. M.; Solo-Gabriele, H. M.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Environmental Management, 2018, 212, pp 266-277
Abstract

The risk from chemical substances in surface waters is often increased during wet weather, due to surface runoff, combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and erosion of contaminated land. There are strong incentives to improve the quality of surface waters affected by human activities, not only from...

Author(s)
Björklund, K.; Bondelind, M.; Karlsson, A.; Karlsson, D.; Sokolova, E.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Environmental Management, 2018, 207, pp 32-42
Abstract

Exposure to contaminated water while swimming or boating or participating in other recreational activities can cause gastrointestinal and respiratory disease. It is not uncommon for water bodies to experience rapid fluctuations in water quality, and it is therefore vital to be able to predict them...

Author(s)
Avila, R.; Horn, B.; Moriarty, E.; Hodson, R.; Moltchanova, E.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Environmental Management, 2018, 206, pp 910-919
Abstract

Critical environments, including water systems in recreational settings, represent an important source of Legionella pneumophila infection in humans. In order to assess the potential risk for legionellosis, we analyzed Legionella contamination of water distribution systems in 36 recreational...

Author(s)
Filippis, P. de; Mozzetti, C.; Amicosante, M.; D'Alò, G. L.; Messina, A.; Varrenti, D.; Giammattei, R.; Giorgio, F. di; Corradi, S.; D'Auria, A.; Fraietta, R.; Gabrieli, R.
Publisher
IWA Publishing, Colchester, UK
Citation
Journal of Water and Health, 2017, 15, 3, pp 402-409
Abstract

Human adenoviruses (HAdVs) are DNA viruses found in recreational water, such as water parks and swimming pools. Human adenovirus 41 (HAdV-41) is the most common serotype detected and is a leading cause of acute diarrheal disease. The focus of this study is to determine the prevalence of HAdVs in...

Author(s)
Shih YiJia; Tao ChiWei; Tsai HsinChi; Huang WenChien; Huang TungYi; Chen JungSheng; Chiu YiChou; Hsu TsuiKang; Hsu BingMu
Publisher
Springer Berlin, Heidelberg, Germany
Citation
Environmental Science and Pollution Research, 2017, 24, 22, pp 18392-18399
Abstract

This paper reports about a pathogenic free-living organism that's affecting the quality of recreational waters in the three states. Naegleria fowleri, multiplies in fresh water during warm seasons which coincides with peak outdoor tourism activities. The deadly organism is acquired while swimming,...

Author(s)
Ladki, S. M.; Samad, J. A.
Publisher
OMICS International, Los Angeles, USA
Citation
Journal of Tourism and Hospitality, 2017, 6, 5, pp 306
Abstract

Clear Creek in Golden, Colorado sees a large number of recreational users during summer, which is expected to result in release of sunscreen chemicals to the water. In this study, water samples were collected hourly for 72 hours over a busy holiday weekend, and were analyzed for the organic...

Author(s)
Reed, R. B.; Martin, D. P.; Bednar, A. J.; Montaño, M. D.; Westerhoff, P.; Ranville, J. F.
Publisher
Royal Society of Chemistry, Cambridge, UK
Citation
Environmental Science: Nano, 2017, 4, 1, pp 69-77
AbstractFull Text

Recreational water quality has been monitored in New South Wales by the Office of Environment and Heritage's Beachwatch Program since 1989, and in partnership with coastal councils since 2002 under the Beachwatch Partnership Program. This report summarises the performance of 250 swimming sites...

Publisher
NSW Government, Office of Environment and Heritage, NSW, Australia
Citation
State of the beaches 2016-2017, 2017, pp iv + 37 pp.

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