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Abstract

Microbial contamination of recreational beaches is often at its worst after heavy rainfall events due to storm floods that carry fecal matter and other pollutants from the watershed. Similarly, overflows of untreated sewage from combined sewerage systems may discharge directly into coastal water or ...

Author(s)
Eregno, F. E.; Tryland, I.; Tjomsland, T.; Kempa, M.; Heistad, A.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Journal of Hydrology (Amsterdam), 2018, 561, pp 179-186
Abstract

Along southern California beaches, the concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) used to quantify the potential presence of fecal contamination in coastal recreational waters have been previously documented to be higher during wet weather conditions (typically winter or spring) than those...

Author(s)
Steele, J. A.; Blackwood, A. D.; Griffith, J. F.; Noble, R. T.; Schiff, K. C.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Water Research (Oxford), 2018, 136, pp 137-149
Abstract

Taiwan is surrounded by oceans, and therefore numerous pleasure beaches attract millions of tourists annually to participate in recreational swimming activities. However, impaired water quality because of fecal pollution poses a potential threat to the tourists' health. This study probabilistically ...

Author(s)
Jang ChengShin; Liang ChingPing
Publisher
IWA Publishing, London, UK
Citation
Water Science and Technology, 2018, 77, 2, pp 534-547
Abstract

Increased emphasis on protection of recreational water quality has led to extensive use of fecal indicator bacteria monitoring of coastal swimming waters in recent years, allowing for long-term, widespread retrospective studies. These studies are especially important for tracking environmental...

Author(s)
Weiskerger, C. J.; Whitman, R. L.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Science of the Total Environment, 2018, 619/620, pp 1236-1246
Abstract

This study combines routinely collected water quality data from Ireland and an on-site survey of waterway users to evaluate whether trip duration is responsive to changes in water quality. Four categories of recreational users are considered: anglers, boaters, other water sports (e.g. rowing, ...

Author(s)
Breen, B.; Curtis, J.; Hynes, S.
Publisher
Taylor & Francis, Abingdon, UK
Citation
Journal of Environmental Economics and Policy, 2018, 7, 1, pp 1-15
Abstract

In Europe, the quality of coastal bathing waters improved considerably in the last decades, mainly due to the more demanding legislation and the adoption of water sanitation plans. In the Nerbioi estuary (North Spain), the Wastewater Treatment Plan implemented between 1990 and 2001 resulted on an...

Author(s)
Pouso, S.; Uyarra, M. C.; Borja, Á.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Environmental Management, 2018, 212, pp 450-461
Abstract

When beach water monitoring programs identify poor water quality, the causes are frequently unknown. We hypothesize that management policies play an important role in the frequency of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) exceedances (enterococci and fecal coliform) at recreational beaches. To test this...

Author(s)
Kelly, E. A.; Feng ZhiXuan; Gidley, M. L.; Sinigalliano, C. D.; Naresh Kumar; Donahue, A. G.; Reniers, A. J. H. M.; Solo-Gabriele, H. M.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Environmental Management, 2018, 212, pp 266-277
Abstract

The risk from chemical substances in surface waters is often increased during wet weather, due to surface runoff, combined sewer overflows (CSOs) and erosion of contaminated land. There are strong incentives to improve the quality of surface waters affected by human activities, not only from...

Author(s)
Björklund, K.; Bondelind, M.; Karlsson, A.; Karlsson, D.; Sokolova, E.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Environmental Management, 2018, 207, pp 32-42
Abstract

Exposure to contaminated water while swimming or boating or participating in other recreational activities can cause gastrointestinal and respiratory disease. It is not uncommon for water bodies to experience rapid fluctuations in water quality, and it is therefore vital to be able to predict them...

Author(s)
Avila, R.; Horn, B.; Moriarty, E.; Hodson, R.; Moltchanova, E.
Publisher
Elsevier, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Journal of Environmental Management, 2018, 206, pp 910-919
Abstract

Contamination of bathing areas is a worrisome factor on a worldwide scale. It mainly affects areas related to recreation in the beach environment. Outbreaks of associated diseases occur during the season, in which the percentage of bathers increases and the presence of deposits of domestic animals. ...

Author(s)
Brito, M. C. N. de; Gomes, V. M.; Macena, D. Â.
Publisher
Universidade do Oeste Paulista (UNOESTE), Sao Paulo, Brazil
Citation
Colloquium Exactarum, 2017, 9, 3, pp 1-12

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