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Abstract

Recreational waters are routes of transmission for most water-related illnesses. In this study, the water quality of five selected swimming pools (SP) was examined after disinfection prior to bathing and after bathing by swimmers. SP sampling was carried out weekly for 4 weeks between August and...

Author(s)
Omoni, V. T.; Torjir, D. N.; Okekporo, S. E.
Publisher
Academic Journals, Lagos, Nigeria
Citation
African Journal of Microbiology Research, 2019, 13, 14, pp 264-272
Abstract

Predicting recreational water quality is key to protecting public health from exposure to wastewater-associated pathogens. It is not feasible to monitor recreational waters for all pathogens; therefore, monitoring programs use fecal indicator bacteria (FIB), such as enterococci, to identify...

Author(s)
Laureano-Rosario, A. E.; Duncan, A. P.; Symonds, E. M.; Savic, D. A.; Muller-Karger, F. E.
Publisher
IWA Publishing, Colchester, UK
Citation
Journal of Water and Health, 2019, 17, 1, pp 137-148
Abstract

It is important that bathing water sites are free as possible from antibiotic resistant bacteria (ARB) to prevent the spread of difficult to treat infections throughout the population. This study examines the possible human exposure to antibiotic resistant Escherichia coli (AR-E. coli) through ...

Author(s)
O'Flaherty, E.; Solimini, A.; Pantanella, F.; Cummins, E.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Science of the Total Environment, 2019, 650, Part 1, pp 786-795
Abstract

Fecal pollution of recreational waters can cause scenic blight and pose a threat to public health, resulting in beach advisories and closures. Fecal indicator bacteria (total and fecal coliforms, Escherichia coli, and enterococci), and alternative indicators of fecal pollution (Clostridium...

Author(s)
Korajkic, A.; McMinn, B. R.; Harwood, V. J.
Publisher
MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland
Citation
International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health, 2018, 15, 12, pp 2842
Abstract

While disinfection of swimming pools is indispensable for microbiological safety, it may lead to the formation of disinfection by-products. Most studies agree that inhalation exposure is the predominant pathway of the associated health risks, but assumptions are based on concentrations measured in...

Author(s)
Pándics, T.; Hofer, Á.; Dura, G.; Vargha, M.; Szigeti, T.; Tóth, E.
Publisher
IWA Publishing, Colchester, UK
Citation
Journal of Water and Health, 2018, 16, 6, pp 947-957
Abstract

Bathing water quality plays a key role for public health, is highly important for recreational tourism and therefore monitored in the EU-Directive 2006/7/EC. To identify pollution hot spots, sources and impacts of the directive-change in 2006, including a change of indicator organisms, we evaluated ...

Author(s)
Buer, A. L.; Gyraite, G.; Wegener, P.; Lange, X.; Katarzyte, M.; Hauk, G.; Schernewski, G.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Marine Pollution Bulletin, 2018, 135, pp 1055-1066
Abstract

Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) was used by the USEPA to establish new recreational water quality criteria in 2012 using the indicator bacteria enterococci. The application of this method has been limited, but resource managers are interested in more timely monitoring results. In this ...

Author(s)
Byappanahalli, M. N.; Nevers, M. B.; Shively, D. A.; Spoljaric, A.; Otto, C.
Publisher
American Society of Agronomy, Madison, USA
Citation
Journal of Environmental Quality, 2018, 47, 5, pp 1086-1093
Abstract

Restoration of highly degraded urban coastal waters often requires large-scale, complex projects, but in the interim, smaller-scale efforts can provide immediate improvements to water quality conditions for visitor use. We examined short-term efforts to improve recreational water quality near the...

Author(s)
Nevers, M. B.; Byappanahalli, M. N.; Shively, D.; Buszka, P. M.; Jackson, P. R.; Phanikumar, M. S.
Publisher
American Society of Agronomy, Madison, USA
Citation
Journal of Environmental Quality, 2018, 47, 5, pp 1042-1050
Abstract

Background: Activities such as swimming, paddling, motor-boating, and fishing are relatively common on US surface waters. Water recreators have a higher rate of acute gastrointestinal illness, along with other illnesses including respiratory, ear, eye, and skin symptoms, compared to non-water...

Author(s)
DeFlorio-Barker, S.; Wing, C.; Jones, R. M.; Dorevitch, S.
Publisher
BioMed Central Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Environmental Health, 2018, 17, 3, pp (9 January 2018)
Abstract

The risk of illness or infection associated with recreational water environments is mainly associated with faecal water contamination. Non-faecal human shedding into the pool water or surrounding area is also a potential source of pathogens such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The aim of the current...

Author(s)
Tirodimos, I.; Christoforidou, E. P.; Nikolaidou, S.; Arvanitidou, M.
Publisher
IWA Publishing, London, UK
Citation
Water Supply, 2018, 18, 6, pp 1937-1945

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