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Leisure Tourism

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Full TextCABI Book Chapter Info
Cover for High fees on the high seas? The provision of extra-fee products and services.

This chapter describes the fees passengers pay on their cruises and the emerging practice of providing and charging for extra-fee products and services. It is argued that a closer examination of the extra-fee phenomenon in the cruise industry exposes three tensions. The first tension relates to...

Author(s)
Weaver, A.
ISBN
2017 CABI (H ISBN 9781780646084)
Type
Book chapter
Full TextCABI Book Chapter Info
Cover for Complexity at sea: managing brands within the cruise industry.

This chapter examines the management of cruise-line brands. Specifically, the chapter shows that the management of these brands can be a complex task. Managing cruise-line brands involves more than simply crafting well-defined brand images. What really matter are customers' experiences, which are...

Author(s)
Weaver, A.
ISBN
2008 CAB International (H ISBN 9781845933234)
Type
Book chapter
Full TextCABI Book Chapter Info
Cover for The Disneyization of cruise travel.

This chapter explores the concept of 'Disneyization' on board certain cruise ships. It outlines the characteristics of such ships as being oriented around specific themes in which service employees are treated as 'emotional labour' where they are expected to shape their own emotions so as to evoke...

Author(s)
Weaver, A.
ISBN
2006 CABI (H ISBN 9781845930486)
Type
Book chapter
Abstract

This paper explores the notion that cruise ships can be conceptualized as spaces of containment. The cruise ships that perhaps best exemplify containment are 'super-sized' cruise ships. In this paper, super-sized cruise ships are defined as vessels that can accommodate more than 2,000 tourists....

Author(s)
Weaver, A.
Publisher
Routledge, London, UK
Citation
Tourism Geographies, 2005, 7, 2, pp 165-184
Abstract

This article explores the notion that the relationship between production and consumption on board cruise ships is, to some extent, obscured. The consumption that takes places on board cruise ships often appears divorced from many of the production-oriented activities that make consumption...

Author(s)
Weaver, A.
Publisher
Cognizant Communication Corporation, Elmsford, USA
Citation
Tourism Culture & Communication, 2005, 5, 3, pp 165-176
Abstract

This paper explores the extent to which current trends within the cruise-ship sector exemplify the five core principles that underpin the 'McDonaldization' thesis. There are some cruise ships that possess attributes consistent with the core principles: efficiency, calculability, predictability,...

Author(s)
Weaver, A.
Publisher
Elsevier, Oxford, UK
Citation
Annals of Tourism Research, 2005, 32, 2, pp 346-366
Abstract

This article analyses the use of performative metaphors in studies that examine interactive service work in the tourism industry. That these metaphors provide a valuable means to conceptualize this type of work is not disputed. Performative metaphors aptly capture the nature of service work, with...

Author(s)
Weaver, A.
Publisher
Sage Publications Ltd, London, UK
Citation
Tourist Studies, 2005, 5, 1, pp 5-27
Abstract

Many sweepstakes feature vacations as prizes. Manufacturers of non-tourism products use such prizes to increase sales. This article draws upon the concept of theming and applies it to an exploratory study of sweepstakes and vacation prizes. Purposeful thematization is widespread, extending from...

Author(s)
Weaver, A.
Publisher
Cognizant Communication Corporation, Elmsford, USA
Citation
Tourism Review International, 2010, 13, 4, pp 263-273