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AbstractFull Text

Bundala wetland is a unique ecosystem, internationally recognized as a Ramsar site since 1990. Climate changes such as increasing temperature, extreme rainfall events, long droughts and sea water intrusion has highly impacted on wetland ecosystems. Further, disposal of agricultural waste water to...

Author(s)
Dharmawardhana, D. T. P. S.; Silva, W. N. de
Publisher
Faculty of Agriculture, Kamburupitiya, Sri Lanka
Citation
"Greener agriculture and environment through convergence of technologies", Proceedings of the International Symposium on Agriculture and Environment - ISAE 2017, 19th January 2017, University of Ruhuna, Sri Lanka, 2017, pp 87-89
AbstractFull Text

Waterside tourism give the majority of the total touristic activity and the income in Hungary. The mass of tourism and guests naturally concentrated around the lake Balaton, and Tisza-pond, but smaller ponds, riversides also preferable places. Unfortunately in the past decade a sudden mass death of ...

Author(s)
Benkó-Kiss, Á.
Publisher
Agroprint, Timisoara, Romania
Citation
Lucrări Științifice, Universitatea de Științe Agricole Și Medicină Veterinară a Banatului, Timisoara, Seria I, Management Agricol, 2012, 14, 4, pp 5-12
Abstract

In the 1980s two invasive azooxanthellate corals, Tubastraea coccinea Lesson, 1829 and Tubastraea tagusensis Wells, 1982 (Dendrophyllidae) invaded the Southwest Atlantic. In Brazil, they were first reported from fouling on oil platforms' and have expanded their range along 3,500 km of the...

Author(s)
Creed, J. C.; Junqueira, A. de O. R.; Fleury, B. G.; Mantelatto, M. C.; Oigman-Pszczol, S. S.
Publisher
Regional Euro-Asian Biological Invasions Centre (REABIC), Helsinki, Finland
Citation
Management of Biological Invasions, 2017, 8, 2, pp 181-195
Abstract

Most modes of human-mediated dispersal of invasive species are directional and vector-based. Classical spatial spread models usually depend on probabilistic dispersal kernels that emphasize distance over direction and have limited ability to depict rare but influential long-distance dispersal...

Author(s)
Koch, F. H.; Yemshanov, D.; Haack, R. A.
Publisher
PENSOFT Publishers, Sofia, Bulgaria
Citation
NeoBiota, 2013, No.18, pp 173-191
AbstractFull Text

This paper describes the conservation measures done for the Parque Provincial E.Tornquist in the Argentine Pampas region, which is the only nature reserve protecting the original grassland. In the park lives more than 20 taxa endemic to the range. The park is totally surrounded by pastures or...

Author(s)
Villamil, C. B.
Publisher
Botanic Gardens Conservation International, Richmond, UK
Citation
Building a sustainable future: the role of botanic gardens. Proceedings of the 3rd Global Botanic Gardens Congress, Wuhan, China, 16-20 April, 2007, 2007, pp 1-6
Abstract

The water hyacinth Eichhornia crassipes (Mart.) Solms is one of the 100 world's worst invaders. Native to tropical freshwaters of tropical South America, with a putative origin in the Amazon basin and the Pantanal of western Brazil, the water hyacinth is nowadays distributed worldwide. In tropical...

Author(s)
Parolin, P.; Rudolph, B.; Bartel, S.; Bresch, C.; Poncet, C.
Publisher
International Society for Horticultural Science (ISHS), Leuven, Belgium
Citation
Acta Horticulturae, 2012, No.937, pp 1133-1140
Abstract

Introduced species present the greatest threat to the unique terrestrial biodiversity of the Galapagos Islands. We assess the current status of plant invasion in Galapagos, predict the likelihood of future naturalizations and invasions from the existing introduced flora, and suggest measures to...

Author(s)
Trueman, M.; Atkinson, R.; Guézou, A.; Wurm, P.
Publisher
Springer, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Biological Invasions, 2010, 12, 12, pp 3949-3960
AbstractFull Text

The Brackenhurst Botanic Garden in the highlands of Kenya was registered in 2004. It was started by planting indigenous trees on land previously used exclusively for exotic species like cypress, eucalyptus, wattle and Australian Blackwood. It now covers 20ha (50 acres) of 'natural' forest plus a...

Author(s)
Nicholson, M.
Publisher
Botanic Gardens Conservation International, Richmond, UK
Citation
Addressing global change: a new agenda for botanic gardens. Fourth Global Botanic Gardens Congress, Dublin, Irish Republic, 13-18 June 2010, 2010, pp 1-3
Abstract

This paper considers the task of controlling invasive weeds and pests in Maungatautari (a forest-clad mountain in Waikato, New Zealand) and restoring it as close as possible to its "unspoilt" state. The possibilities for ecotourism in Maungatautari are also explored.

Author(s)
Wallace, D. G.
Publisher
New Zealand Grassland Association, Palmerston North, New Zealand
Citation
Proceedings of the New Zealand Grassland Association, 2002, 64, pp 17-19
Abstract

Lake Mead, Nevada is the largest reservoir by volume in the United States, as well as a popular sport fishing destination. In January 2007, the invasive quagga mussel Dreissena rostriformis bugensis (Andrusov, 1897) was discovered in the reservoir and concerns began to arise about potential...

Author(s)
Loomis, E. M.; Sjöberg, J. C.; Wong, W. H.; Gerstenberger, S. L.
Publisher
Regional Euro-Asian Biological Invasions Centre (REABIC), Helsinki, Finland
Citation
Aquatic Invasions, 2011, 6, 2, pp 157-168

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