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Abstract

This paper examines the opportunities for Indigenous communities to share cultural knowledge in tourism by increasing the use of digital knowledge-sharing with various technological platforms. The research was conducted with residents of Pine Creek in the Northern Territory (Australia). In-depth...

Author(s)
McGinnis, G.; Harvey, M.; Young, T.
Publisher
Routledge, Abingdon, UK
Citation
Tourism Planning and Development, 2020, 17, 1, pp 96-125
Abstract

In northern Australia, elaborate forms of indirection and self-effacement shape the media play of young Indigenous Australians. Young people animate celebrity avatars and their iconic voices as kinds of camouflage, breathing life into the artifacts of social media across a range of online platforms ...

Author(s)
Fisher, D.
Publisher
Wiley, Boston, USA
Citation
American Ethnologist, 2019, 46, 1, pp 34-46
Abstract

Gambling impacts affect Australian Indigenous families and communities in diverse and complex ways. Indigenous people throughout Australia engage in a broad range of regulated and unregulated gambling activities. Challenges in this area include the complexities that come with delivering services...

Author(s)
Fogarty, M.; Coalter, N.; Gordon, A.; Breen, H.
Publisher
Oxford University Press, Oxford, UK
Citation
Health Promotion International, 2018, 33, 1, pp 115-122
Abstract

Freshwater resources underpin multiple livelihood systems around the world, particularly in highly productive tropical floodplain regions. Sustaining Indigenous people's access to freshwater resources for customary harvesting, while developing alternative livelihood strategies can be challenging....

Author(s)
Ligtermoet, E.
Publisher
Springer, Amsterdam, Netherlands
Citation
Reviews in Fish Biology and Fisheries, 2016, 26, 4, pp 649-678
Abstract

Current research suggests that Aboriginal-controlled organizations should play a larger role in developing and implementing sports-based programmes for Aboriginal young people. In this paper, we explore the influence of an Aboriginal-controlled organization and its government-funded remote...

Author(s)
Peralta, L. R.; Cinelli, R. L.
Publisher
Routledge, Abingdon, UK
Citation
Sport in Society: Cultures, Commerce, Media, Politics, 2016, 19, 7, pp 973-989
Abstract

Indigenous tourism products, attractions and activities can offer a point of difference for tourism destinations, and consequently the role of, and opportunities for, Indigenous people in providing these tourism experiences have been recognised increasingly by government and industry alike. This...

Author(s)
Fletcher, C.; Pforr, C.; Brueckner, M.
Publisher
Routledge, Abingdon, UK
Citation
Journal of Sustainable Tourism, 2016, 24, 8/9, pp 1100-1120
Abstract

This paper examines how Indigenous cultures and their connections to country are presented to the public in protected areas through a textual analysis of interpretive signage. In protected areas, different representational tropes are used to interpret colonial/settler, natural heritage and...

Author(s)
Clarke, A.; Waterton, E.
Publisher
Routledge, Abingdon, UK
Citation
Landscape Research, 2015, 40, 8, pp 971-992
Abstract

This paper discusses the background and significance of the Milpirri festival, held in Lajamanu every second year. The festival uses public sequences of song and dance from Warlpiri ceremonies, to educate everyone about Warlpiri traditional law. Children are also encouraged to create their own hip...

Author(s)
Patrick, W. S. J.
Publisher
UTSePress, Sydney, Australia
Citation
Cultural Studies Review, 2015, 21, 1, pp 121-131
Abstract

Tangentyere Artists is an Aboriginal owned and directed art centre that represents urban and regional artists from eighteen Alice Springs town camp communities and beyond. In this article, artists from Tangentyere discuss their work.

Author(s)
O'Connor, S.; Boko, M.; Daniels, L.; Mulda, S. M.
Publisher
UTSePress, Sydney, Australia
Citation
Cultural Studies Review, 2015, 21, 1, pp 206-218
Abstract

Yarrenty Arltere Art Centre is located in Larrapinta Valley, one of the oldest urban Aboriginal settlements on Arrernte county and one of the first of the eighteen housing associations or 'town camps' to be formally recognised within the history of Mbuntua/Alice Springs. Here, the coordinator of...

Author(s)
Rubuntja, M.; Sharpe, D.; Wallace, S.; Sheedy, L.
Publisher
UTSePress, Sydney, Australia
Citation
Cultural Studies Review, 2015, 21, 1, pp 219-229

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