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Abstract

There is growing interest in the application of rapid quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and other PCR-based methods for recreational water quality monitoring and management programs. This interest has strengthened given the publication of U.S. Environmental Protection Agency...

Author(s)
Sivaganesan, M.; Aw TiongGim; Briggs, S.; Dreelin, E.; Aslan, A.; Dorevitch, S.; Shrestha, A.; Isaacs, N.; Kinzelman, J.; Kleinheinz, G.; Noble, R.; Rediske, R.; Scull, B.; Rosenberg, S.; Weberman, B.; Sivy, T.; Southwell, B.; Siefring, S.; Oshima, K.; Haugland, R.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Water Research (Oxford), 2019, 156, pp 456-464
Abstract

Most Great Lakes communities rely on culture-based E. coli methods for monitoring fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) at recreational beaches. These cultivation methods require 18 or more hours to generate results. As a consequence, public notifications about beach action value (BAV) exceedance are...

Author(s)
Shrestha, A.; Dorevitch, S.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Water Research (Oxford), 2019, 156, pp 395-403
Abstract

Fecal contamination of recreational waters with cattle manure can pose a risk to public health due to the potential presence of various zoonotic pathogens. Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) have a long history of use in the assessment of recreational water quality, but FIB quantification provides no...

Author(s)
Korajkic, A.; McMinn, B. R.; Ashbolt, N. J.; Sivaganesan, M.; Harwood, V. J.; Shanks, O. C.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Science of the Total Environment, 2019, 650, Part 1, pp 1292-1302
Abstract

Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) have been used to assess fecal contamination in recreational water. However, enteric viruses have been shown to be more persistent in the environment and resistant to wastewater treatment than bacteria. Recently, U.S Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the...

Author(s)
Cooksey, E. M.; Gulshan Singh; Scott, L. C.; Aw TiongGim
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Science of the Total Environment, 2019, 649, pp 1514-1521
Abstract

Along southern California beaches, the concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) used to quantify the potential presence of fecal contamination in coastal recreational waters have been previously documented to be higher during wet weather conditions (typically winter or spring) than those...

Author(s)
Steele, J. A.; Blackwood, A. D.; Griffith, J. F.; Noble, R. T.; Schiff, K. C.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Water Research (Oxford), 2018, 136, pp 137-149
Abstract

Increased emphasis on protection of recreational water quality has led to extensive use of fecal indicator bacteria monitoring of coastal swimming waters in recent years, allowing for long-term, widespread retrospective studies. These studies are especially important for tracking environmental...

Author(s)
Weiskerger, C. J.; Whitman, R. L.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Science of the Total Environment, 2018, 619/620, pp 1236-1246
Abstract

Large databases of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) measurements are available for coastal waters. With the assistance of satellite imagery, we illustrated the power of assessing data for many sites by evaluating beach features such as geomorphology, distance from rivers and canals, presence of piers ...

Author(s)
Donahue, A.; Feng ZhiXuan; Kelly, E.; Reniers, A.; Solo-Gabriele, H. M.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Marine Pollution Bulletin, 2017, 121, 1/2, pp 160-167
Abstract

Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) are known to accumulate in foreshore beach sand and pore water (referred to as foreshore reservoir) where they act as a non-point source for contaminating adjacent surface waters. While guidelines exist for sampling surface waters at recreational beaches, there is no...

Author(s)
Vogel, L. J.; Edge, T. A.; O'Carroll, D. M.; Solo-Gabriele, H. M.; Kushnir, C. S. E.; Robinson, C. E.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Water Research (Oxford), 2017, 121, pp 204-212
Abstract

Indicator bacteria, which are conventionally used to evaluate recreational water quality, can originate from various non-human enteric and extra-enteric sources, hence they may not be indicative of human health risk nor do they provide information on the sources of contamination. In this study we...

Author(s)
Kirs, M.; Kisand, V.; Wong, M.; Caffaro Filho, R. A.; Moravcik, P.; Harwood, V. J.; Yoneyama, B.; Fujioka, R. S.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Water Research (Oxford), 2017, 116, pp 23-33
Abstract

Biochar has demonstrated promising performance as an amendment to biofilter soil media in removing fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) from simulated stormwater. However, there is no study that investigates its efficacy in treating natural stormwater runoff. Additional information, including the effects ...

Author(s)
Afrooz, A. R. M. N.; Boehm, A. B.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Ecological Engineering, 2017, 102, pp 320-330

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