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Abstract

Fecal contamination of recreational waters with cattle manure can pose a risk to public health due to the potential presence of various zoonotic pathogens. Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) have a long history of use in the assessment of recreational water quality, but FIB quantification provides no...

Author(s)
Korajkic, A.; McMinn, B. R.; Ashbolt, N. J.; Sivaganesan, M.; Harwood, V. J.; Shanks, O. C.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Science of the Total Environment, 2019, 650, Part 1, pp 1292-1302
Abstract

Fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) have been used to assess fecal contamination in recreational water. However, enteric viruses have been shown to be more persistent in the environment and resistant to wastewater treatment than bacteria. Recently, U.S Environmental Protection Agency has proposed the...

Author(s)
Cooksey, E. M.; Gulshan Singh; Scott, L. C.; Aw TiongGim
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Science of the Total Environment, 2019, 649, pp 1514-1521
Abstract

Along southern California beaches, the concentrations of fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) used to quantify the potential presence of fecal contamination in coastal recreational waters have been previously documented to be higher during wet weather conditions (typically winter or spring) than those...

Author(s)
Steele, J. A.; Blackwood, A. D.; Griffith, J. F.; Noble, R. T.; Schiff, K. C.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Water Research (Oxford), 2018, 136, pp 137-149
Abstract

In developing countries, urban surface waters are particularly affected by faecal pollution from domestic wastewaters due to the lack of sanitation and wastewater treatment plants. The presence of pathogenic microorganisms limits the uses of these waters for recreation and economic activities. In...

Author(s)
Ouattara, N. K.; Kouamé, C. K. Y.; Kamagaté, B.; Droh, L. G.; Ouattara, A.; Gourène, G.
Publisher
Academic Journals, Lagos, Nigeria
Citation
African Journal of Microbiology Research, 2018, 12, 42, pp 965-972
Abstract

The potential of constructed wetlands (CWs) as a low technology for wastewater treatment is timely but there is a need to understand the route of pathogenic bacteria (Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella spp.) and indicator organisms (Enterobacteriaceae and Escherichia coli) present in wastewater...

Author(s)
Calheiros, C. S. C.; Ferreira, V.; Magalhães, R.; Teixeira, P.; Castro, P. M. L.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Ecological Engineering, 2017, 102, pp 344-351
Abstract

To protect recreational water users from waterborne pathogen exposure, it is crucial that waterways are monitored for the presence of harmful bacteria. In NYC, a citizen science campaign is monitoring waterways impacted by inputs of storm water and untreated sewage during periods of rainfall....

Author(s)
Farnham, D. J.; Gibson, R. A.; Hsueh, D. Y.; McGillis, W. R.; Culligan, P. J.; Zain, N.; Buchanan, R.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Science of the Total Environment, 2017, 580, pp 168-177
Abstract

Current World Health Organisation figures estimate that ∼2.5 million deaths per year result from recreational contact with contaminated water sources. Concerns about quantitative risk assessments of waterways using faecal indicator organisms (FIOs) as surrogates to infer pathogenic risk currently...

Author(s)
Henry, R.; Schang, C.; Kolotelo, P.; Coleman, R.; Rooney, G.; Schmidt, J.; Deletic, A.; McCarthy, D. T.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 2016, 174, pp 18-26
Abstract

Knowledge of pathogen removal in stormwater biofilters (also known as stormwater bioretention systems or rain gardens) has predominately been determined using bacterial indicators, and the removal of reference pathogens in these systems has rarely been investigated. Furthermore, current...

Author(s)
Chandrasena, G. I.; Deletic, A.; McCarthy, D. T.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Journal of Hydrology (Amsterdam), 2016, 537, pp 248-259
Abstract

Soil samples were collected in August 2014 in Jiguanshan Forest Park in Sichuan Province, China to investigate the effects of recreational activities on the amount of soil microbes and enzyme activities. It was found that as recreation activities decreased, the number of bacteria, fungi and...

Author(s)
Liu Jing; Xu ZhengJingRu; Peng Peihao; Pan Xin
Publisher
Jiangsu Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nanjing, China
Citation
Jiangsu Agricultural Sciences, 2016, 44, 2, pp 398-402
Abstract

Microbial contamination in urban stormwater is one of the most widespread and challenging water quality issues in developed countries. Low impact development (LID) best management practices (BMPs) restore pre-urban hydrology by treating and/or harvesting urban runoff and stormwater, and can be...

Author(s)
Peng Jian; Cao YiPing; Rippy, M. A.; Afrooz, A. R. M. N.; Grant, S. B.
Publisher
MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland
Citation
Water, 2016, 8, 12, pp 600

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