Cookies on Leisure Tourism

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

 

Continuing to use www.cabi.org  means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

Leisure Tourism

Your source for all tourism, leisure and hospitality information

>>> Sign up to receive our Leisure, Hospitality & Tourism e-newsletter, book alerts, and offers <<<

Results per page:

Search results

Abstract

Animals, such as birds, are a source of fecal indicator bacteria and pathogens in the environment. Our objective was to determine whether a colony of cliff swallows nesting underneath a bridge would yield a measurable increase in fecal indicator bacteria (specifically Escherichia coli) in the...

Author(s)
Sejkora, P.; Kirisits, M. J.; Barrett, M.
Publisher
American Water Resources Association (AWRA), Middleburg, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Water Resources Association, 2011, 47, 6, pp 1275-1284
Abstract

Human adenoviruses (HAdV) may be implicated in some disease outbreaks associated with recreational water exposures, typically in swimming pools. Modern molecular methods can be used to detect HAdV in environmental water samples. During the EU FP6 Project VIROBATHE a database of over 290 HAdV...

Author(s)
Wyer, M. D.; Wyn-Jones, A. P.; Kay, D.; Au-Yeung HoKong [Au-Yeung, H. K. C. ]; Gironés, R.; López-Pila, J.; Husman, A. M. de R.; Rutjes, S.; Schneider, O.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Water Research (Oxford), 2012, 46, 13, pp 4130-4141
Abstract

We used site-specific quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) to assess the probability of adenovirus illness for three groups of swimmers: adults with primary contact, children with primary contact, and secondary contact regardless of age. Human enteroviruses and adenoviruses were monitored...

Author(s)
Kundu, A.; McBride, G.; Wuertz, S.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Water Research (Oxford), 2013, 47, 16, pp 6309-6325
Abstract

Recently, the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) revised their recreational water quality criteria, in which adjustments were made by approving enterococci (ENT) quantitative PCR (qPCR) as an alternative, rapid method and advocating the use of predictive models for water quality...

Author(s)
Gonzalez, R. A.; Noble, R. T.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Water Research (Oxford), 2014, 48, pp 296-305
Abstract

Faecal contamination of estuarine and coastal waters can pose a risk to human health, particularly in areas used for shellfish production or recreation. Routine microbiological water quality testing highlights areas of faecal indicator bacteria (FIB) contamination within the water column, but fails ...

Author(s)
Perkins, T. L.; Clements, K.; Baas, J. H.; Jago, C. F.; Jones, D. L.; Malham, S. K.; McDonald, J. E.
Publisher
Public Library of Sciences (PLoS), San Francisco, USA
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2014, 9, 11, pp e112951
Abstract

The representativeness of ambient water samples collected from bridge crossings has occasionally been challenged because critics contend birds nesting on bridges elevate fecal indicator bacteria concentrations over samples collected from river reaches not spanned by bridges. This study was designed ...

Author(s)
Pendergrass, D.; McFarland, A.; Hauck, L.
Publisher
American Water Resources Association (AWRA), Middleburg, USA
Citation
Journal of the American Water Resources Association, 2015, 51, 6, pp 1519-1533
Abstract

Existing biofiltration systems have shown variable and often inadequate bacterial removal efficacy. Previous work has shown antimicrobial media copper-zeolite as a promising alternative to reduce the variability and excessive discharge of faecal indicator bacteria such as Escherichia coli. A...

Author(s)
Li YaLi; McCarthy, D. T.; Deletic, A.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Ecological Engineering, 2016, 90, pp 234-243
Abstract

Current World Health Organisation figures estimate that ∼2.5 million deaths per year result from recreational contact with contaminated water sources. Concerns about quantitative risk assessments of waterways using faecal indicator organisms (FIOs) as surrogates to infer pathogenic risk currently...

Author(s)
Henry, R.; Schang, C.; Kolotelo, P.; Coleman, R.; Rooney, G.; Schmidt, J.; Deletic, A.; McCarthy, D. T.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Estuarine, Coastal and Shelf Science, 2016, 174, pp 18-26
Abstract

Recreational water quality is commonly monitored by means of culture based faecal indicator organism (FIOs) assays. However, these methods are costly and time-consuming; a serious disadvantage when combined with issues such as non-specificity and user bias. New culture and molecular methods have...

Author(s)
Schang, C.; Henry, R.; Kolotelo, P. A.; Prosser, T.; Crosbie, N.; Grant, T.; Cottam, D.; O'Brien, P.; Coutts, S.; Deletic, A.; McCarthy, D. T.
Publisher
Public Library of Sciences (PLoS), San Francisco, USA
Citation
PLoS ONE, 2016, 11, 5, pp e0155848
Abstract

Biochar has demonstrated promising performance as an amendment to biofilter soil media in removing fecal indicator bacteria (FIB) from simulated stormwater. However, there is no study that investigates its efficacy in treating natural stormwater runoff. Additional information, including the effects ...

Author(s)
Afrooz, A. R. M. N.; Boehm, A. B.
Publisher
Elsevier Ltd, Oxford, UK
Citation
Ecological Engineering, 2017, 102, pp 320-330

Refine Results

Sort Order
Author
Geographical Location
Organisms
Subject Topics