Cookies on Leisure Tourism

Like most websites we use cookies. This is to ensure that we give you the best experience possible.

 

Continuing to use www.cabi.org  means you agree to our use of cookies. If you would like to, you can learn more about the cookies we use.

Leisure Tourism

Your source for all tourism, leisure and hospitality information

>>> Sign up to receive our Leisure, Hospitality & Tourism e-newsletter, book alerts, and offers <<<

Results per page:

Search results

Abstract

Wilderness in Australia has no formal legal designation at a national level as it does in the USA. In addition, new federal environmental legislation abdicates responsibility almost entirely to the states. A national wilderness inventory has recently been completed, but abandoned by the current...

Author(s)
Buckley, R.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 2), pp 190-193
Abstract

Economic growth is a perennial national goal. Perpetual economic growth and wilderness preservation are mutually exclusive. Wilderness scholarship has not addressed this conflict. The economics profession is unlikely to contribute to resolution, because the neoclassical paradigm holds that there is ...

Author(s)
Czech, B.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 2), pp 194-200
Abstract

A questionnaire survey was conducted in 1995 (1239 responses, 44% of those contacted) in 135 counties in 7 states (Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia and Alabama) in order to assess knowledge and attitudes towards wilderness in a relatively rural region of...

Author(s)
Fly, J. M.; Jones, R. E.; Cordell, H. K.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 2), pp 201-204
Abstract

The current effort to rethink public involvement in decision-making processes for federal lands is gaining momentum. Advocates of alternative decision making processes seek to involve communities in more meaningful ways than traditional NEPA-style public participation. These new processes take the...

Author(s)
Yung, L.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 2), pp 301-307
Abstract

Whitebark pine (Pinus albicaulis) is a keystone species in upper subalpine forests of the northern Rocky Mountains, Cascades, and Sierra Nevada in the USA and Canada, that has been declining because of recent mountain pine beetle (Dentroctonus ponderosae) and exotic blister rust (Cronartium...

Author(s)
Keane, R. E.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 3), pp 84-92
Abstract

Wilderness managers are forced to make increasingly difficult decisions about where to focus limited resources. Traditionally, areas of high visitor use and high impact are prioritized over areas of light use and light impact. However, areas that contain little to no human impact and contain the...

Author(s)
Merigliano, L.; Smith, B.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 4), pp 236-242
Abstract

A report is given of a dialogue session which was a continuation of a debate about norms and the application of normative standards to wilderness management that has taken place throughout the 1990s at national meetings and in the research literature. Researchers who have made significant...

Author(s)
Heywood, J. L.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 4), pp 260-264
Abstract

Arriving at appropriate limits on the size of groups in wilderness remains a difficult and often controversial management challenge. This paper presents a review of the state of knowledge regarding group size from an ecological impact and visitor experience standpoint, a survey of wilderness...

Author(s)
Monz, C.; Roggenbuck, J.; Cole, D.; Brame, R.; Yoder, A.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 4), pp 265-273
Abstract

The Te Wahipounamu World Heritage Area, 2.6 million hectares (6 424 600 acres) of mountains, glaciers, forests, and fiords, contains New Zealand's main wilderness resource. The Department of Conservation's comprehensive Visitor Strategy has been used to manage visitors to the widely differing sites ...

Author(s)
Molloy, L.; Reedy, M.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-14, pp 162-167
Abstract

Education is recognized as one of the most effective tools in managing wilderness. Nevertheless, there are few wilderness management courses taught and no degree programmes offered at the university level. This creates a fundamental problem for wilderness educators: how to deliver current, relevant ...

Author(s)
Peel, S.; Freimund, W.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-14, pp 199-204

Refine Results

Sort Order
Author
Geographical Location
Organisms
Subject Topics