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Abstract

This research aims to understand whether and how trail design and resource impacts influence the quality and quantity of restorative experiences. The focus of past research has been on understanding the quality-side (what happens). What is missing is a better understanding of the quantity-side of...

Author(s)
Pierskalla, C. D.; Siniscalchi, J. M.; Hammitt, W. E.; Smaldone, D. A.; Storck, S. J.
Publisher
USDA Forest Service, Newtown Square, USA
Citation
General Technical Report - Northern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2007, No.NRS-14, pp 497-508
Abstract

Iceland's natural resources include an abundance of geothermal energy and hydropower, of which only 10-15% is currently being utilized. These are clean, renewable sources of energy. The cost to convert these resources to electricity is relatively low, making them attractive and highly marketable...

Author(s)
Gunnarsson, B.; Gunnarsson, M. V.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2002, No.RMRS-P-26, pp 54-63
Abstract

While the concept of acceptability is central to the Limits of Acceptable Change framework, there is inadequate understanding of how acceptability is judged and how unacceptable conditions affect visitor experiences. To address this knowledge gap, 97 visitors to nine wilderness areas in western USA ...

Author(s)
Hoss, A. F.; Brunson, M. W.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 4), pp 128-133
Abstract

The Leave No Trace (LNT) educational programme in the USA has the potential to provide wilderness users with useful minimum impact information. For LNT to be effective, managers need to understand who is most/least aware of minimum impact practices and how to expose users to LNT messages. This...

Author(s)
Confer, J. J.; Mowen, A. J.; Graefe, A. R.; Absher, J. D.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 4), pp 193-197
Abstract

This study examined the attitudes of 574 first, third and sixth grade students', in 24 elementary school classes in the central coast area of California, USA, toward the impact monster and the good guy roles in the impact monster skit, and determined if attitudes differed by gender and grade level. ...

Author(s)
Hendricks, W. H.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 4), pp 203-207
Abstract

Attempts to influence the behaviour of wilderness visitors through the use of information are limited by the visitors' reception of that information. This study, conducted at Mt. Rogers National Recreation Area in western Virginia, USA, examined the information gathering behaviour of wilderness...

Author(s)
Ramthun, R.; Kersey, L.; Rogers, J.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 4), pp 217-220
Abstract

Most parks are interested in conveying hiking safety and minimum impact techniques to visitors. At Grand Canyon National Park, in Arizona, USA, providing such information to more than 2000 day use hikers per day has been a longstanding concern whose effort has increased in intensity over the past...

Author(s)
Stewart, W.; Cole, D.; Manning, R.; Valliere, W.; Taylor, J.; Lee, M.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 4), pp 221-225
Abstract

Wilderness managers are forced to make increasingly difficult decisions about where to focus limited resources. Traditionally, areas of high visitor use and high impact are prioritized over areas of light use and light impact. However, areas that contain little to no human impact and contain the...

Author(s)
Merigliano, L.; Smith, B.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 4), pp 236-242
Abstract

Arriving at appropriate limits on the size of groups in wilderness remains a difficult and often controversial management challenge. This paper presents a review of the state of knowledge regarding group size from an ecological impact and visitor experience standpoint, a survey of wilderness...

Author(s)
Monz, C.; Roggenbuck, J.; Cole, D.; Brame, R.; Yoder, A.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 4), pp 265-273
Abstract

This paper reviews the body of literature on recreation resource impacts and their management in the USA, with a primary focus on research within designated wildernesses during the past 15 years since the previous review (published in 1987). Recreation impacts have become a salient issue among...

Author(s)
Leung YuFai; Marion, J. L.
Publisher
Rocky Mountain Research Station, Fort Collins, USA
Citation
Proceedings - Rocky Mountain Research Station, USDA Forest Service, 2000, No. RMRS-P-15(Vol. 5), pp 23-48

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