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AbstractFull Text

Climatic change cannot be considered as ordinary because of its scale and rapidity. Global climate is projected to continuous changes over the current century and beyond. Our life style and daily energy consumption patterns emit large quantities of greenhouse gases (GHGs). The worsening of this...

Author(s)
Saha, S.; Munda, S.
Publisher
State Agricultural Technologists' Service Association, West Bengal, India
Citation
SATSA Mukhaptra Annual Technical Issue, 2017, 21, pp 119-131
AbstractFull Text

Ever since it was found that apple snails have an appetite for rice seedlings, there have been numerous studies on how to control several Pomacea species in rice fields. Unfortunately, less effort has been devoted to investigating the invasive snails' impact on natural wetlands and other aquatic...

Author(s)
Carlsson, N. O. L.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 45-61
AbstractFull Text

The apple snail, Pomacea canaliculata, an alien invasive species that causes considerable damage to rice culture, is now being used as an alternative protein source in small-scale aquaculture in the Philippines. Interviews with selected fish farmers rearing Japanese koi and Macrobrachium...

Author(s)
Casal, C. M. V.; Espedido, J. C.; Palma, A.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 387-398
AbstractFull Text

Experiments were undertaken to assess the efficacy of methanol and water extractions of fresh neem (Azadirachta indica) seed against apple snails. Each assay included five neem treatments (10-50% dilutions of concentrated extract), a control treatment and a chemical treatment using Niclosamide....

Author(s)
Siti Noor, H. M. L.; Mohd Fahmi Keni
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 343-350
AbstractFull Text

The freshwater snail family Ampullariidae includes nine extant genera. Species of Pomacea in particular, but also species of Pila and Marisa, have become invasive where they have been introduced. Introduction of Pomacea spp. to Asia around 1980, initially to Taiwan, followed by their rapid range...

Author(s)
Cowie, R. H.; Hayes, K. A.; Strong, E. E.; Thiengo, S. C.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 3-32
AbstractFull Text

This article characterises and analyses the presence of the alien invasive species Pomacea canaliculata in Ecuador, a pest present in many countries that has severe impacts on agriculture, human health and the natural environment. For the first time, a list of the native species of the genus ...

Author(s)
Correoso Rodriguez, M.; Espinosa, E.; Coello Rodriguez, M.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 257-291
AbstractFull Text

South American apple snails, Pomacea spp. (Ampullariidae) have been established in Singapore since the late 1980s. Based on molecular analyses and shell morphology, two species of Pomacea (P. canaliculata and P. maculata) have been found. The introduction of Pomacea to Singapore was probably...

Author(s)
Ng, T. H.; Tan, S. K.; Yeo, D. C. J.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 221-239
AbstractFull Text

Apple snails in the genus Pomacea are not native to Pakistan. They were first discovered in Pakistan in 2009, in Haleji Lake, Sindh. Initially, the species was identified as P. canaliculata but subsequently this was corrected to P. maculata. The introduction of these snails to Haleji Lake was a...

Author(s)
Baloch, W. A.
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 213-219
AbstractFull Text

Non-native apple snails were introduced to Myanmar in the early 1990s. They quickly spread to many of the states and regions of the eastern part of the country, becoming major pests of irrigated rice. A range of cultural, biological and chemical control measures have been used to control the...

Author(s)
Khin Khin Marlar Myint; Khin Nyunt Ye
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 209-211
AbstractFull Text

This paper discusses the invasion of the apple snail Pomacea canaliculata in East Malaysia in the 1990s. As soon as the snail was noticed in rice fields the Department of Agriculture immediately initiated a research program to study the new pest and launched a control operation comprising cultural, ...

Author(s)
Sin TeoSu; Nur Najwa Hamsein
Publisher
Philippine Rice Research Institute, Muñoz, Philippines
Citation
Biology and management of invasive apple snails, 2017, pp 197-208

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