Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions.

Book cover for Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions.

Description

This book contains 23 chapters divided into seven parts. Part I reviews the key hypotheses in invasion ecology that invoke biotic interactions to explain aspects of plant invasion dynamics; and reviews models, theories and hypotheses on how invasion performance and impact of introduced species in recipient ecosystems can be conjectured according to biotic interactions between native and non-native...

Chapter 18 (Page no: 324)

How a network approach has advanced the field of plant invasion ecology.

Every organism on Earth, whether in natural or anthropogenic environments, is connected to a complex web of life, the famous 'entangled bank' coined by Darwin in 1859. Non-native species can integrate into local 'banks' by establishing novel associations with the resident species. In that context, network ecology has been an important tool to study the interactions of non-native species and the effects on recipient communities due to its ability to simultaneously investigate the assembly and disassembly of species interactions as well as their functional roles. Its visually appealing tools and relatively simple metrics gained momentum among scientists and are increasingly applied in different areas of ecology, from the more theoretical grounds to applied research on restoration and conservation. A network approach helps us to understand how plant invasions may or may not form novel species associations, how they change the structure of invaded communities, the outcomes for ecosystem functionality and, ultimately, the implications for the conservation of ecological interactions. Networks have been widely used on pollination studies, especially from temperate zones, unveiling their nested patterns and the mechanisms by which non-native plants integrate into local communities. Yet, very few papers have used network approaches to assess plant invasion effects in other systems such as plant-herbivore, plant-pathogen or seed-dispersal processes. Here we describe how joining network ecology with plant invasion biology started and how it has developed over the last few decades. We show the extent of its contribution, despite contradictory results and biases, to a better understanding of the role of non-native plant species in shaping community structure. Finally, we explore how it can be further improved to answer emerging questions.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions - an overview. Author(s): Traveset, A., Richardson, D. M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 26) The role of biotic interactions in invasion ecology: theories and hypotheses. Author(s): Hui Cang, Landi, P., Latombe, G.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 45) Soil biota and non-native plant invasions. Author(s): Callaway, R. M., Lucero, J. E.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 67) Pollination interactions promoting plant invasions. Author(s): Montero-Castaño, A., Traveset, A.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 90) Seed dispersal interactions promoting plant invasions. Author(s): Díaz Vélez, M. C., Ferreras, A. E., Paiaro, V.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 105) Ungulates as dispersal vectors of non-native plants. Author(s): Baltzinger, C., Shukla, U., Msweli, L. S., Downs, C. T.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 138) The role of plant-plant facilitation in non-native plant invasions. Author(s): Cavieres, L. A.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 153) How direct and indirect non-native interactions can promote plant invasions, lead to invasional meltdown and inform management decisions. Author(s): Kuebbing, S. E.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 177) Biotic resistance to plant invasions. Author(s): Parker, J. D., Devaney, J. L., Lemoine, N. P.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 192) EICA 2.0: a general model of enemy release and defence in plant and animal invasions. Author(s): Honor, R., Colautti, R. I.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 208) The role of pathogens in plant invasions. Author(s): Kendig, A. E., Flory, S. L., Goss, E. M., Holt, R. D., Clay, K., Harmon, P. F., Lane, B. R., Adhikari, A., Wojan, C. M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 226) Direct and indirect effects of herbivores influencing plant invasions. Author(s): Kotanen, P. M.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 241) Impacts of non-native plants on plant-pollinator interactions. Author(s): Aizen, M. A., Morales, C. L.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 256) The effect of non-native plant invasions on the dispersal of native seeds. Author(s): Heleno, R. H.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 270) Allelopathic disruptions of biotic interactions due to non-native plants. Author(s): Smith-Ramesh, L. M.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 281) Competition between native and non-native plants. Author(s): Wandrag, E. M., Catford, J. A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 308) Indirect biotic interactions of plant invasions with native plants and animals. Author(s): Allen, W. J.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 340) Molecular ecology of plant-microbial interactions during invasions: progress and challenges. Author(s): Roux, J. J. le
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 363) How can progress in the understanding of antagonistic interactions be applied to improve biological control of plant invasions? Author(s): Hill, M. P., Coetzee, J. A.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 377) Restoration of pollination interactions in communities invaded by non-native plants. Author(s): Kaiser-Bunbury, C. N., Simmons, B. I.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 391) Restoration of seed dispersal interactions in communities invaded by non-native plants. Author(s): Silva, F. R. da, Pizo, M. A.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 402) Multiple feedbacks due to biotic interactions across trophic levels can lead to persistent novel conditions that hinder restoration. Author(s): Yelenik, S. G., D'Antonio, C. M., Rehm, E. M., Caldwell, I. R.