Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions.

Book cover for Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions.

Description

This book contains 23 chapters divided into seven parts. Part I reviews the key hypotheses in invasion ecology that invoke biotic interactions to explain aspects of plant invasion dynamics; and reviews models, theories and hypotheses on how invasion performance and impact of introduced species in recipient ecosystems can be conjectured according to biotic interactions between native and non-native...

Chapter 16 (Page no: 281)

Competition between native and non-native plants.

The introduction of species to new locations leads to novel competitive interactions between resident native and newly-arriving non-native species. The nature of these competitive interactions can influence the suitability of the environment for the survival, reproduction and spread of non-native plant species, and the impact those species have on native plant communities. Indeed, the large literature on competition among plants reflects its importance in shaping the composition of plant communities, including the invasion success of non-native species. While competition and invasion theory have historically developed in parallel, the increasing recognition of the synergism between the two themes has led to new insights into how non-native plant species invade native plant communities, and the impacts they have on those plant communities. This chapter provides an entry point into the aspects of competition theory that can help explain the success, dominance and impacts of invasive species. It focuses on resource competition, which arises wherever the resources necessary for establishment, survival, reproduction and spread are in limited supply. It highlights key hypotheses developed in invasion biology that relate to ideas of competition, outlines biotic and abiotic factors that influence the strength of competition and species' relative competitive abilities, and describes when and how competition between non-native and native plant species can influence invasion outcomes. Understanding the processes that influence the strength of competition between non-native and native plant species is a necessary step towards understanding the causes and consequences of biological invasions.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions - an overview. Author(s): Traveset, A., Richardson, D. M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 26) The role of biotic interactions in invasion ecology: theories and hypotheses. Author(s): Hui Cang, Landi, P., Latombe, G.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 45) Soil biota and non-native plant invasions. Author(s): Callaway, R. M., Lucero, J. E.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 67) Pollination interactions promoting plant invasions. Author(s): Montero-Castaño, A., Traveset, A.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 90) Seed dispersal interactions promoting plant invasions. Author(s): Díaz Vélez, M. C., Ferreras, A. E., Paiaro, V.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 105) Ungulates as dispersal vectors of non-native plants. Author(s): Baltzinger, C., Shukla, U., Msweli, L. S., Downs, C. T.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 138) The role of plant-plant facilitation in non-native plant invasions. Author(s): Cavieres, L. A.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 153) How direct and indirect non-native interactions can promote plant invasions, lead to invasional meltdown and inform management decisions. Author(s): Kuebbing, S. E.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 177) Biotic resistance to plant invasions. Author(s): Parker, J. D., Devaney, J. L., Lemoine, N. P.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 192) EICA 2.0: a general model of enemy release and defence in plant and animal invasions. Author(s): Honor, R., Colautti, R. I.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 208) The role of pathogens in plant invasions. Author(s): Kendig, A. E., Flory, S. L., Goss, E. M., Holt, R. D., Clay, K., Harmon, P. F., Lane, B. R., Adhikari, A., Wojan, C. M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 226) Direct and indirect effects of herbivores influencing plant invasions. Author(s): Kotanen, P. M.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 241) Impacts of non-native plants on plant-pollinator interactions. Author(s): Aizen, M. A., Morales, C. L.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 256) The effect of non-native plant invasions on the dispersal of native seeds. Author(s): Heleno, R. H.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 270) Allelopathic disruptions of biotic interactions due to non-native plants. Author(s): Smith-Ramesh, L. M.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 308) Indirect biotic interactions of plant invasions with native plants and animals. Author(s): Allen, W. J.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 324) How a network approach has advanced the field of plant invasion ecology. Author(s): Emer, C., Timóteo, S.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 340) Molecular ecology of plant-microbial interactions during invasions: progress and challenges. Author(s): Roux, J. J. le
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 363) How can progress in the understanding of antagonistic interactions be applied to improve biological control of plant invasions? Author(s): Hill, M. P., Coetzee, J. A.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 377) Restoration of pollination interactions in communities invaded by non-native plants. Author(s): Kaiser-Bunbury, C. N., Simmons, B. I.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 391) Restoration of seed dispersal interactions in communities invaded by non-native plants. Author(s): Silva, F. R. da, Pizo, M. A.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 402) Multiple feedbacks due to biotic interactions across trophic levels can lead to persistent novel conditions that hinder restoration. Author(s): Yelenik, S. G., D'Antonio, C. M., Rehm, E. M., Caldwell, I. R.