Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions.

Book cover for Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions.

Description

This book contains 23 chapters divided into seven parts. Part I reviews the key hypotheses in invasion ecology that invoke biotic interactions to explain aspects of plant invasion dynamics; and reviews models, theories and hypotheses on how invasion performance and impact of introduced species in recipient ecosystems can be conjectured according to biotic interactions between native and non-native...

Chapter 13 (Page no: 241)

Impacts of non-native plants on plant-pollinator interactions.

There has been growing interest in the consequences of invasive non-native plants for the plant-pollinator mutualism, most likely because of its relevance for the maintenance of terrestrial biodiversity and food production. However, the development of this research field has been thematically uneven and the overall evidence inconclusive. Many studies have focused on how non-native plants interact with native plants via pollinator sharing, which have allowed meta-analytical syntheses, whereas several others have looked at how frequently non-native plants integrate into native plant-pollinator webs and how they affect network structure. However, relatively few studies have addressed the consequences of invasive plants for pollinators. Overall, the research approach in this area has been predominantly phenomenological rather than mechanistic, which has hindered our understanding of apparently contradictory evidence. One key characteristic of invasive non-native plants that seems to mediate negative effects on the pollination mutualism is the high relative abundance that they reach at late stages of invasion. This high dominance is apparently the main trigger of all the disruptive direct and indirect effects that are discussed in this chapter. Finally, we identify several intriguing questions on the ecological and evolutionary consequences of invasive plants for the plant-pollinator mutualism waiting to be answered.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions - an overview. Author(s): Traveset, A., Richardson, D. M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 26) The role of biotic interactions in invasion ecology: theories and hypotheses. Author(s): Hui Cang, Landi, P., Latombe, G.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 45) Soil biota and non-native plant invasions. Author(s): Callaway, R. M., Lucero, J. E.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 67) Pollination interactions promoting plant invasions. Author(s): Montero-Castaño, A., Traveset, A.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 90) Seed dispersal interactions promoting plant invasions. Author(s): Díaz Vélez, M. C., Ferreras, A. E., Paiaro, V.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 105) Ungulates as dispersal vectors of non-native plants. Author(s): Baltzinger, C., Shukla, U., Msweli, L. S., Downs, C. T.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 138) The role of plant-plant facilitation in non-native plant invasions. Author(s): Cavieres, L. A.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 153) How direct and indirect non-native interactions can promote plant invasions, lead to invasional meltdown and inform management decisions. Author(s): Kuebbing, S. E.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 177) Biotic resistance to plant invasions. Author(s): Parker, J. D., Devaney, J. L., Lemoine, N. P.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 192) EICA 2.0: a general model of enemy release and defence in plant and animal invasions. Author(s): Honor, R., Colautti, R. I.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 208) The role of pathogens in plant invasions. Author(s): Kendig, A. E., Flory, S. L., Goss, E. M., Holt, R. D., Clay, K., Harmon, P. F., Lane, B. R., Adhikari, A., Wojan, C. M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 226) Direct and indirect effects of herbivores influencing plant invasions. Author(s): Kotanen, P. M.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 256) The effect of non-native plant invasions on the dispersal of native seeds. Author(s): Heleno, R. H.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 270) Allelopathic disruptions of biotic interactions due to non-native plants. Author(s): Smith-Ramesh, L. M.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 281) Competition between native and non-native plants. Author(s): Wandrag, E. M., Catford, J. A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 308) Indirect biotic interactions of plant invasions with native plants and animals. Author(s): Allen, W. J.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 324) How a network approach has advanced the field of plant invasion ecology. Author(s): Emer, C., Timóteo, S.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 340) Molecular ecology of plant-microbial interactions during invasions: progress and challenges. Author(s): Roux, J. J. le
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 363) How can progress in the understanding of antagonistic interactions be applied to improve biological control of plant invasions? Author(s): Hill, M. P., Coetzee, J. A.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 377) Restoration of pollination interactions in communities invaded by non-native plants. Author(s): Kaiser-Bunbury, C. N., Simmons, B. I.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 391) Restoration of seed dispersal interactions in communities invaded by non-native plants. Author(s): Silva, F. R. da, Pizo, M. A.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 402) Multiple feedbacks due to biotic interactions across trophic levels can lead to persistent novel conditions that hinder restoration. Author(s): Yelenik, S. G., D'Antonio, C. M., Rehm, E. M., Caldwell, I. R.