Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions.

Book cover for Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions.

Description

This book contains 23 chapters divided into seven parts. Part I reviews the key hypotheses in invasion ecology that invoke biotic interactions to explain aspects of plant invasion dynamics; and reviews models, theories and hypotheses on how invasion performance and impact of introduced species in recipient ecosystems can be conjectured according to biotic interactions between native and non-native...

Chapter 12 (Page no: 226)

Direct and indirect effects of herbivores influencing plant invasions.

Non-native plants rarely escape damage by herbivores. Instead, upon arrival in a new region, they begin to acquire new enemies, replacing those they have lost during their migration. These herbivores can include both natives to the new region and species that have themselves been accidentally or deliberately introduced from elsewhere, potentially including examples originating from the invader's original range. Shifts of new enemies from other hosts can occur over a range of timescales, depending in part on whether evolutionary change is required, but are likely to be faster for plants that are widespread and phylogenetically related to a herbivore's original host, and faster for generalist herbivores than for specialists. The occurrence of herbivores is not necessarily uniform across an invader's range; instead, they may be less diverse or abundant in host populations that are geographically or ecologically marginal, though existing evidence is mixed. Collectively, these new suites of herbivores can affect the growth and fitness of invaders, both directly by damaging them and indirectly by attacking their competitors. Studies comparing the demographic consequences of herbivory for successful vs unsuccessful invaders may help to clarify how often such impacts limit invasiveness. The view that an invader enters 'enemy-free' space is inaccurate; instead, persistence and spread of non-native plants often may be affected by the novel and changing assemblage of herbivores that they acquire within their new distribution.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions - an overview. Author(s): Traveset, A., Richardson, D. M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 26) The role of biotic interactions in invasion ecology: theories and hypotheses. Author(s): Hui Cang, Landi, P., Latombe, G.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 45) Soil biota and non-native plant invasions. Author(s): Callaway, R. M., Lucero, J. E.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 67) Pollination interactions promoting plant invasions. Author(s): Montero-Castaño, A., Traveset, A.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 90) Seed dispersal interactions promoting plant invasions. Author(s): Díaz Vélez, M. C., Ferreras, A. E., Paiaro, V.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 105) Ungulates as dispersal vectors of non-native plants. Author(s): Baltzinger, C., Shukla, U., Msweli, L. S., Downs, C. T.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 138) The role of plant-plant facilitation in non-native plant invasions. Author(s): Cavieres, L. A.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 153) How direct and indirect non-native interactions can promote plant invasions, lead to invasional meltdown and inform management decisions. Author(s): Kuebbing, S. E.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 177) Biotic resistance to plant invasions. Author(s): Parker, J. D., Devaney, J. L., Lemoine, N. P.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 192) EICA 2.0: a general model of enemy release and defence in plant and animal invasions. Author(s): Honor, R., Colautti, R. I.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 208) The role of pathogens in plant invasions. Author(s): Kendig, A. E., Flory, S. L., Goss, E. M., Holt, R. D., Clay, K., Harmon, P. F., Lane, B. R., Adhikari, A., Wojan, C. M.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 241) Impacts of non-native plants on plant-pollinator interactions. Author(s): Aizen, M. A., Morales, C. L.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 256) The effect of non-native plant invasions on the dispersal of native seeds. Author(s): Heleno, R. H.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 270) Allelopathic disruptions of biotic interactions due to non-native plants. Author(s): Smith-Ramesh, L. M.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 281) Competition between native and non-native plants. Author(s): Wandrag, E. M., Catford, J. A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 308) Indirect biotic interactions of plant invasions with native plants and animals. Author(s): Allen, W. J.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 324) How a network approach has advanced the field of plant invasion ecology. Author(s): Emer, C., Timóteo, S.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 340) Molecular ecology of plant-microbial interactions during invasions: progress and challenges. Author(s): Roux, J. J. le
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 363) How can progress in the understanding of antagonistic interactions be applied to improve biological control of plant invasions? Author(s): Hill, M. P., Coetzee, J. A.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 377) Restoration of pollination interactions in communities invaded by non-native plants. Author(s): Kaiser-Bunbury, C. N., Simmons, B. I.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 391) Restoration of seed dispersal interactions in communities invaded by non-native plants. Author(s): Silva, F. R. da, Pizo, M. A.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 402) Multiple feedbacks due to biotic interactions across trophic levels can lead to persistent novel conditions that hinder restoration. Author(s): Yelenik, S. G., D'Antonio, C. M., Rehm, E. M., Caldwell, I. R.