Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions.

Book cover for Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions.

Description

This book contains 23 chapters divided into seven parts. Part I reviews the key hypotheses in invasion ecology that invoke biotic interactions to explain aspects of plant invasion dynamics; and reviews models, theories and hypotheses on how invasion performance and impact of introduced species in recipient ecosystems can be conjectured according to biotic interactions between native and non-native...

Chapter 7 (Page no: 138)

The role of plant-plant facilitation in non-native plant invasions.

Biological invasions are one the most important drivers of the current environmental changes generating important biodiversity losses. Although several hypotheses have been proposed to understand the mechanisms underpinning biological invasions, most of them relate to negative interactions among native and invasive species, where the capacity for many invasive species to reduce diversity is often attributed to a greater competitiveness. However, neighbouring species can also show facilitative interactions, where the presence of one species can facilitate another directly by improving environmental conditions or indirectly through negative effects on a third party species. This chapter reviews the scientific literature on plant invasion, seeking examples of where facilitative interactions either among native and non-native plant species or among non-native species were demonstrated. There are several examples of native species that directly facilitate a non-native species, while examples of native species having a negative effect either on a native or a non-native species that compete with a target non-native, generating a net indirect facilitative effect of the native on the target non-native, are less numerous. Direct facilitation among non-native species has been reported as part of the 'invasional meltdown' phenomenon (Chapter 8, this volume). There are cases where non-native species can have a negative effect on a native species that competes with a target non-native, generating a net indirect facilitative effect among the non-natives. Finally, a non-native species can have a direct facilitative effect on native species, which might have important implications in restoration.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Plant invasions: the role of biotic interactions - an overview. Author(s): Traveset, A., Richardson, D. M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 26) The role of biotic interactions in invasion ecology: theories and hypotheses. Author(s): Hui Cang, Landi, P., Latombe, G.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 45) Soil biota and non-native plant invasions. Author(s): Callaway, R. M., Lucero, J. E.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 67) Pollination interactions promoting plant invasions. Author(s): Montero-Castaño, A., Traveset, A.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 90) Seed dispersal interactions promoting plant invasions. Author(s): Díaz Vélez, M. C., Ferreras, A. E., Paiaro, V.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 105) Ungulates as dispersal vectors of non-native plants. Author(s): Baltzinger, C., Shukla, U., Msweli, L. S., Downs, C. T.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 153) How direct and indirect non-native interactions can promote plant invasions, lead to invasional meltdown and inform management decisions. Author(s): Kuebbing, S. E.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 177) Biotic resistance to plant invasions. Author(s): Parker, J. D., Devaney, J. L., Lemoine, N. P.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 192) EICA 2.0: a general model of enemy release and defence in plant and animal invasions. Author(s): Honor, R., Colautti, R. I.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 208) The role of pathogens in plant invasions. Author(s): Kendig, A. E., Flory, S. L., Goss, E. M., Holt, R. D., Clay, K., Harmon, P. F., Lane, B. R., Adhikari, A., Wojan, C. M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 226) Direct and indirect effects of herbivores influencing plant invasions. Author(s): Kotanen, P. M.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 241) Impacts of non-native plants on plant-pollinator interactions. Author(s): Aizen, M. A., Morales, C. L.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 256) The effect of non-native plant invasions on the dispersal of native seeds. Author(s): Heleno, R. H.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 270) Allelopathic disruptions of biotic interactions due to non-native plants. Author(s): Smith-Ramesh, L. M.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 281) Competition between native and non-native plants. Author(s): Wandrag, E. M., Catford, J. A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 308) Indirect biotic interactions of plant invasions with native plants and animals. Author(s): Allen, W. J.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 324) How a network approach has advanced the field of plant invasion ecology. Author(s): Emer, C., Timóteo, S.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 340) Molecular ecology of plant-microbial interactions during invasions: progress and challenges. Author(s): Roux, J. J. le
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 363) How can progress in the understanding of antagonistic interactions be applied to improve biological control of plant invasions? Author(s): Hill, M. P., Coetzee, J. A.
Chapter: 21 (Page no: 377) Restoration of pollination interactions in communities invaded by non-native plants. Author(s): Kaiser-Bunbury, C. N., Simmons, B. I.
Chapter: 22 (Page no: 391) Restoration of seed dispersal interactions in communities invaded by non-native plants. Author(s): Silva, F. R. da, Pizo, M. A.
Chapter: 23 (Page no: 402) Multiple feedbacks due to biotic interactions across trophic levels can lead to persistent novel conditions that hinder restoration. Author(s): Yelenik, S. G., D'Antonio, C. M., Rehm, E. M., Caldwell, I. R.