Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Invasion biology: hypotheses and evidence.

Book cover for Invasion biology: hypotheses and evidence.

Description

This book, containing 18 chapters, combines the hierarchy-of-hypotheses (HoH) approach with hypothesis networks for invasion biology. This book aims to further develop the HoH approach by inviting critical comments (Part I), apply it to 12 major invasion hypotheses (Part II) and explore how it can be expanded to a hierarchically structured hypothesis network (Chapter 7 and Part III). It is importa...

Chapter 8 (Page no: 60)

Biotic resistance and island susceptibility hypotheses.

The biotic resistance hypothesis sensu stricto is also known as the diversity-invasibility hypothesis. It proposes that ecosystems with high biodiversity are more resistant against non-native species than ecosystems with lower biodiversity. It is a classic hypothesis of the field and our systematic literature search identified 155 empirical studies that examined it. Most of these studies question the hypothesis. The frequency of supportive observational field studies is only about 15%. Although the frequency of supportive experimental studies, which are typically done at smaller spatial scales, is significantly higher, it is still below 50%. The island susceptibility hypothesis is topically similar and posits that continents are more resistant against non-native species than islands. In more specific terms, the island susceptibility hypothesis states that non-native species are more likely to become established and have major ecological impacts on islands than on continents. Our literature search only identified 17 empirical tests of this hypothesis with five of them being supportive. Thus, the biotic resistance and island susceptibility hypotheses are not frequently supported by existing empirical evidence. Most studies addressing them examined the number of non-native species or their establishment success, whereas relatively few studies measured impacts of non-native species. Studies that measured abundance, biomass or cover of non-native species - which are related to impact - more frequently supported the resistance hypothesis than other studies. A promising way forward might thus be to narrow the definition and scope of both hypotheses (and possibly rename them), so that 'resistance' and 'susceptibility' are related to impact of nonnative species. The next steps will then be to critically test these revised hypotheses and further refine the relevant ecological contexts that mediate the importance or magnitude of resistance.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 3) Invasion biology: searching for predictions and prevention, and avoiding lost causes. Author(s): Cassey, P., García-Díaz, P., Lockwood, J. L., Blackburn, T. M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 14) The hierarchy-of-hypotheses approach. Author(s): Heger, T., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 19) Hierarchy of hypotheses or hierarchy of predictions? Clarifying key concepts in ecological research. Author(s): Farji-Brener, A. G., Amador-Vargas, S.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 23) Mapping theoretical and evidential landscapes in ecological science: Levins' virtue trade-off and the hierarchy-of-hypotheses approach. Author(s): Griesemer, J.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 30) A hierarchy of hypotheses or a network of models. Author(s): Scheiner, S. M., Fox, G. A.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 38) The hierarchy-of-hypotheses approach updated - a toolbox for structuring and analysing theory, research and evidence. Author(s): Heger, T., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 49) A network of invasion hypotheses. Author(s): Enders, M., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 71) Disturbance hypothesis. Author(s): Nordheimer, R., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 79) Invasional meltdown hypothesis. Author(s): Braga, R. R., Gómez Aparicio, L., Heger, T., Vitule, J. R. S., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 92) Enemy release hypothesis. Author(s): Heger, T., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 103) Evolution of increased competitive ability and shifting defence hypotheses. Author(s): Müller, C.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 124) Tens rule. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Pyšek, P.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 133) Phenotypic plasticity hypothesis. Author(s): Torchyk, O., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 140) Darwin's naturalization and limiting similarity hypotheses. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Erhard, F.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 147) Propagule pressure hypothesis. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Starzer, J.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 157) Synthesis. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Heger, T.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 167) Conclusions and outlook. Author(s): Heger, T., Jeschke, J. M.