Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Invasion biology: hypotheses and evidence.

Book cover for Invasion biology: hypotheses and evidence.

Description

This book, containing 18 chapters, combines the hierarchy-of-hypotheses (HoH) approach with hypothesis networks for invasion biology. This book aims to further develop the HoH approach by inviting critical comments (Part I), apply it to 12 major invasion hypotheses (Part II) and explore how it can be expanded to a hierarchically structured hypothesis network (Chapter 7 and Part III). It is importa...

Chapter 7 (Page no: 49)

A network of invasion hypotheses.

Hypotheses of research disciplines are typically not isolated from each other but share similarities. In a broad sense as defined here, they form an important part of the theoretical-conceptual understanding of a given topic, e.g. invasion hypotheses sensu lato represent an important part of our understanding of biological invasions. Dynamic research disciplines such as invasion biology have so many hypotheses that it is even hard for experts to keep track, and researchers from other disciplines as well as policy-makers, managers and other interested people find it extremely complicated to get to grips with invasion hypotheses. To tackle this situation, we argue that it is useful to define key hypotheses and visualize their relationships. We define 35 of the arguably most common invasion hypotheses and outline three approaches to create hypothesis networks that visualize the similarities and dissimilarities between hypotheses: (i) the bibliometric approach; (ii) the survey approach; and (iii) the matrix approach. The latter approach is in the focus of this chapter. It is centred around a matrix that represents the characteristics or traits of each hypothesis. Here we assigned such traits to 35 invasion hypotheses based on 13 trait categories. We then calculated the similarities between them and created a hypothesis network visualizing these similarities. With the same trait matrix, we created a smaller network focused on the 12 hypotheses featured in this book. This network thus illustrates the relationships between these 12 hypotheses and can be used as a map for the following chapters.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 3) Invasion biology: searching for predictions and prevention, and avoiding lost causes. Author(s): Cassey, P., García-Díaz, P., Lockwood, J. L., Blackburn, T. M.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 14) The hierarchy-of-hypotheses approach. Author(s): Heger, T., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 19) Hierarchy of hypotheses or hierarchy of predictions? Clarifying key concepts in ecological research. Author(s): Farji-Brener, A. G., Amador-Vargas, S.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 23) Mapping theoretical and evidential landscapes in ecological science: Levins' virtue trade-off and the hierarchy-of-hypotheses approach. Author(s): Griesemer, J.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 30) A hierarchy of hypotheses or a network of models. Author(s): Scheiner, S. M., Fox, G. A.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 38) The hierarchy-of-hypotheses approach updated - a toolbox for structuring and analysing theory, research and evidence. Author(s): Heger, T., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 60) Biotic resistance and island susceptibility hypotheses. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Debille, S., Lortie, C. J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 71) Disturbance hypothesis. Author(s): Nordheimer, R., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 79) Invasional meltdown hypothesis. Author(s): Braga, R. R., Gómez Aparicio, L., Heger, T., Vitule, J. R. S., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 92) Enemy release hypothesis. Author(s): Heger, T., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 103) Evolution of increased competitive ability and shifting defence hypotheses. Author(s): Müller, C.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 124) Tens rule. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Pyšek, P.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 133) Phenotypic plasticity hypothesis. Author(s): Torchyk, O., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 140) Darwin's naturalization and limiting similarity hypotheses. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Erhard, F.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 147) Propagule pressure hypothesis. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Starzer, J.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 157) Synthesis. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Heger, T.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 167) Conclusions and outlook. Author(s): Heger, T., Jeschke, J. M.