Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Invasion biology: hypotheses and evidence.

Book cover for Invasion biology: hypotheses and evidence.

Description

This book, containing 18 chapters, combines the hierarchy-of-hypotheses (HoH) approach with hypothesis networks for invasion biology. This book aims to further develop the HoH approach by inviting critical comments (Part I), apply it to 12 major invasion hypotheses (Part II) and explore how it can be expanded to a hierarchically structured hypothesis network (Chapter 7 and Part III). It is importa...

Chapter 1 (Page no: 3)

Invasion biology: searching for predictions and prevention, and avoiding lost causes.

The introduction and establishment of alien species is one of the many profound influences of ongoing anthropogenic global environmental change. Invasion biology has emerged as the interdisciplinary study of the patterns, processes and consequences of the redistribution of biodiversity across all environments and spatio-temporal scales. The modern discipline hinges on the knowledge that biological invasions cannot be defined and studied solely by their final outcome of establishing alien species but rather as a sequential series of stages, or barriers, that all alien species transit: the 'invasion pathway'. Some of the most important influences for a species transiting these sequential stages (i.e. transport, introduction, establishment and spread) are event-level effects, which vary independently of species and location, such as the number of individuals released in any given location (propagule pressure). The number of studies of biological invasions has increased exponentially over the past two decades, and we now have a significant body of research on different aspects of the invasion process. In particular, the hierarchical nature of the invasion pathway has lent itself strongly to modern statistical methods in hierarchical modelling. Now, the science behind invasive species management must continue to develop innovative ways of using this accumulated knowledge for delivering actionable management procedures.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 2 (Page no: 14) The hierarchy-of-hypotheses approach. Author(s): Heger, T., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 19) Hierarchy of hypotheses or hierarchy of predictions? Clarifying key concepts in ecological research. Author(s): Farji-Brener, A. G., Amador-Vargas, S.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 23) Mapping theoretical and evidential landscapes in ecological science: Levins' virtue trade-off and the hierarchy-of-hypotheses approach. Author(s): Griesemer, J.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 30) A hierarchy of hypotheses or a network of models. Author(s): Scheiner, S. M., Fox, G. A.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 38) The hierarchy-of-hypotheses approach updated - a toolbox for structuring and analysing theory, research and evidence. Author(s): Heger, T., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 49) A network of invasion hypotheses. Author(s): Enders, M., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 60) Biotic resistance and island susceptibility hypotheses. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Debille, S., Lortie, C. J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 71) Disturbance hypothesis. Author(s): Nordheimer, R., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 79) Invasional meltdown hypothesis. Author(s): Braga, R. R., Gómez Aparicio, L., Heger, T., Vitule, J. R. S., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 92) Enemy release hypothesis. Author(s): Heger, T., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 103) Evolution of increased competitive ability and shifting defence hypotheses. Author(s): Müller, C.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 124) Tens rule. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Pyšek, P.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 133) Phenotypic plasticity hypothesis. Author(s): Torchyk, O., Jeschke, J. M.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 140) Darwin's naturalization and limiting similarity hypotheses. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Erhard, F.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 147) Propagule pressure hypothesis. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Starzer, J.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 157) Synthesis. Author(s): Jeschke, J. M., Heger, T.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 167) Conclusions and outlook. Author(s): Heger, T., Jeschke, J. M.