Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Invasive species and global climate change.

Book cover for Invasive species and global climate change.

Description

This book is part of the "CABI Invasive Series", which addresses all topics relating to invasive species, including biosecurity surveillance, mapping and modelling, economics of invasive species and species interactions in plant invasions. Aimed at researchers, upper-level students and policy makers, titles in the series provide international coverage of topics related to invasive species, includi...

Chapter 16 (Page no: 253)

Identifying climate change as a factor in the establishment and persistence of invasive weeds in agricultural crops.

Climate change may lead to extensive shifts in invasive weed distributions by impacting their colonization and persistence in new habitats. These alterations will require an enhanced capacity to predict the future range of these species and the implementation of effective management strategies. This is particularly critical for agroecosystems where climate-induced changes in the composition and impact of weedy species are likely to add great uncertainty to the biodiversity, stability and productivity of these systems. In recent years, various modelling approaches have been employed to examine the current and potential distributions of invasive weeds at a range of scales in response to projected climate change. This chapter details the efforts under way to map the distributions of invasive weed species based on climate change projections for the USA. The chapter also identifies specific agricultural systems that are most vulnerable to invasion in a changing climate. It concludes with a brief discussion of the un certain ties, future directions and challenges of current modelling approaches and provides suggestions for improvement. Although bioclimatic envelope modelling has provided a useful approach for projecting potential weed species distribution changes resulting from climatic change (see Chapter 15), there is a need to incorporate more details of weed physiology and genetics, as well as habitat complexity, in these models. Given rapidly increasing anthropogenic impacts, land-use changes and climate variability, such refinements to the modelling approach could be critical to managing plant invasions under climate change.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Introduction. Author(s): Dukes, J. S., Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 9) Communicating the dynamic complexities of climate and ecology: species invasion and resource changes. Author(s): Thompson, J. P., Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 22) Climate change and plant pathogen invasions. Author(s): Garrett, K. A., Thomas-Sharma, S., Forbes, G. A., Nopsa, J. H.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 45) Analysis of invasive insects: links to climate change. Author(s): Gutierrez, A. P., Ponti, L.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 62) Climate change, plant traits and invasion in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Author(s): Blumenthal, D. M., Kray, J. A.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 81) Non-native species in Antarctic terrestrial environments: the impacts of climate change and human activity. Author(s): Hughes, K. A., Convey, P.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 101) Synergies between climate change and species invasions: evidence from marine systems. Author(s): Sorte, C. J. B.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 117) Ragweed in Eastern Europe. Author(s): Makra, L., Matyasovszky, I., Deák, Á. J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 129) Climate change and alien species in South Africa. Author(s): Irlich, U. M., Richardson, D. M., Davies, S. J., Chown, S. L.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 148) Climate change and 'Alien Species in National Parks': revisited. Author(s): Stohlgren, T. J., Resnik, J. R., Plumb, G. E.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 169) Invasive plants in a rapidly changing climate: an Australian perspective. Author(s): Webber, B. L., Klinken, R. D. van, Scott, J. K.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 198) Invasive species of China and their responses to climate change. Author(s): Li Bo, Wei ShuJuan, Li Hui, Yang Qiang, Lu Meng
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 219) Identifying invasive species in real time: early detection and distribution mapping system (EDDMapS) and other mapping tools. Author(s): Wallace, R. D., Bargeron, C. T.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 232) Global identification of invasive species: the CABI Invasive Species Compendium as a resource. Author(s): Diaz-Soltero, H., Scott, P. R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 240) The biogeography of invasive plants - projecting range shifts with climate change. Author(s): Bradley, B. A.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 271) Assessing and managing the impact of climate change on invasive species: the PBDM approach. Author(s): Gutierrez, A. P., Ponti, L.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 293) Climate, CO2 and invasive weed management. Author(s): Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 305) Early detection and rapid response: a cost-effective strategy for minimizing the establishment and spread of new and emerging invasive plants by global trade, travel and climate change. Author(s): Westbrooks, R. G., Manning, S. T., Waugh, J. D.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 326) Adapting to invasions in a changing world: invasive species as an economic resource. Author(s): Barnes, M. A., Deines, A. M., Gentile, R. M., Grieneisen, L. E.