Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Invasive species and global climate change.

Book cover for Invasive species and global climate change.

Description

This book is part of the "CABI Invasive Series", which addresses all topics relating to invasive species, including biosecurity surveillance, mapping and modelling, economics of invasive species and species interactions in plant invasions. Aimed at researchers, upper-level students and policy makers, titles in the series provide international coverage of topics related to invasive species, includi...

Chapter 12 (Page no: 198)

Invasive species of China and their responses to climate change.

China is a rapidly developing country with the largest share of the world's population. The extent of human activity, combined with diverse climates and landscapes, may allow for greater risk of biological invasions. To date, at least 529 invasive species have been identified, including 270 species of higher plants, 198 species of animals and 61 species of microbes, resulting in an estimated annual economic loss of US$18.9 billion. Evidence to date suggests that different components of climate change (i.e. temperature, altered precipitation, extreme weather events and rising CO2 concentration) have already influenced the biology of invasive species in China. The influence of climate change may increase the negative economic or environmental consequences of some invasives; however, others may become disadvantaged. Although we are still at the earliest stages of understanding the consequences of climate change on invasive species biology, China is one of the countries that may be affected most dramatically by invasive species. Overall, understanding the interactions between climate change and invasive species biology is an important scientific challenge, but one in which Chinese scientists can make significant contributions. The inclusion of the invasive species issue in some of China's ongoing projects on global change could begin to address critical research needs in this area.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Introduction. Author(s): Dukes, J. S., Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 9) Communicating the dynamic complexities of climate and ecology: species invasion and resource changes. Author(s): Thompson, J. P., Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 22) Climate change and plant pathogen invasions. Author(s): Garrett, K. A., Thomas-Sharma, S., Forbes, G. A., Nopsa, J. H.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 45) Analysis of invasive insects: links to climate change. Author(s): Gutierrez, A. P., Ponti, L.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 62) Climate change, plant traits and invasion in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Author(s): Blumenthal, D. M., Kray, J. A.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 81) Non-native species in Antarctic terrestrial environments: the impacts of climate change and human activity. Author(s): Hughes, K. A., Convey, P.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 101) Synergies between climate change and species invasions: evidence from marine systems. Author(s): Sorte, C. J. B.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 117) Ragweed in Eastern Europe. Author(s): Makra, L., Matyasovszky, I., Deák, Á. J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 129) Climate change and alien species in South Africa. Author(s): Irlich, U. M., Richardson, D. M., Davies, S. J., Chown, S. L.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 148) Climate change and 'Alien Species in National Parks': revisited. Author(s): Stohlgren, T. J., Resnik, J. R., Plumb, G. E.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 169) Invasive plants in a rapidly changing climate: an Australian perspective. Author(s): Webber, B. L., Klinken, R. D. van, Scott, J. K.
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 219) Identifying invasive species in real time: early detection and distribution mapping system (EDDMapS) and other mapping tools. Author(s): Wallace, R. D., Bargeron, C. T.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 232) Global identification of invasive species: the CABI Invasive Species Compendium as a resource. Author(s): Diaz-Soltero, H., Scott, P. R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 240) The biogeography of invasive plants - projecting range shifts with climate change. Author(s): Bradley, B. A.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 253) Identifying climate change as a factor in the establishment and persistence of invasive weeds in agricultural crops. Author(s): DiTommaso, A., Zhong Qin, Clements, D. R.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 271) Assessing and managing the impact of climate change on invasive species: the PBDM approach. Author(s): Gutierrez, A. P., Ponti, L.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 293) Climate, CO2 and invasive weed management. Author(s): Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 305) Early detection and rapid response: a cost-effective strategy for minimizing the establishment and spread of new and emerging invasive plants by global trade, travel and climate change. Author(s): Westbrooks, R. G., Manning, S. T., Waugh, J. D.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 326) Adapting to invasions in a changing world: invasive species as an economic resource. Author(s): Barnes, M. A., Deines, A. M., Gentile, R. M., Grieneisen, L. E.