Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Invasive species and global climate change.

Book cover for Invasive species and global climate change.

Description

This book is part of the "CABI Invasive Series", which addresses all topics relating to invasive species, including biosecurity surveillance, mapping and modelling, economics of invasive species and species interactions in plant invasions. Aimed at researchers, upper-level students and policy makers, titles in the series provide international coverage of topics related to invasive species, includi...

Chapter 10 (Page no: 148)

Climate change and 'Alien Species in National Parks': revisited.

Many units comprising the National Park Service system in the USA were established to protect native species and historical landscapes and scenery, and to provide public enjoyment of the same, as long as the natural area remained 'unimpaired for future generations'. However, a growing human population and a global economy have spawned a 40-fold increase in global trade and transportation since 1950. This created what may turn out to be the most significant challenge to Park Service management: the invasion of alien (i.e. exotic, non-native) plants, animals and diseases into 'protected areas'. Climate change may compound the problem by interacting with other existing ecosystem stressors to affect the distribution, abundance and impact of invasive species. Scientists' warnings have not been entirely ignored, but harmful invasions may be outpacing effective managerial responses. This chapter revisits a paper published in 1995 by D.B. Houston and E.G. Schreiner entitled 'Alien Species in National Parks: Drawing Lines in Space and Time', to demonstrate that despite efforts to contain alien plants, animals and diseases, the number and abundance of conspicuous invaders may be increasing. New and spreading alien species are directly affecting native species abundance, their genetic integrity and the management of adjacent lands, and human health. While climate change may add an additional or interacting threat to park resources, we found that at park scales and over short periods (17 years in this case), it has become increasingly difficult to achieve the primary mission of the National Park Service, for example protecting native species and ecosystems for present and future generations, due to the continuing invasions of alien organisms largely resulting from increased trade and transportation.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Introduction. Author(s): Dukes, J. S., Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 9) Communicating the dynamic complexities of climate and ecology: species invasion and resource changes. Author(s): Thompson, J. P., Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 22) Climate change and plant pathogen invasions. Author(s): Garrett, K. A., Thomas-Sharma, S., Forbes, G. A., Nopsa, J. H.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 45) Analysis of invasive insects: links to climate change. Author(s): Gutierrez, A. P., Ponti, L.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 62) Climate change, plant traits and invasion in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Author(s): Blumenthal, D. M., Kray, J. A.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 81) Non-native species in Antarctic terrestrial environments: the impacts of climate change and human activity. Author(s): Hughes, K. A., Convey, P.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 101) Synergies between climate change and species invasions: evidence from marine systems. Author(s): Sorte, C. J. B.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 117) Ragweed in Eastern Europe. Author(s): Makra, L., Matyasovszky, I., Deák, Á. J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 129) Climate change and alien species in South Africa. Author(s): Irlich, U. M., Richardson, D. M., Davies, S. J., Chown, S. L.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 169) Invasive plants in a rapidly changing climate: an Australian perspective. Author(s): Webber, B. L., Klinken, R. D. van, Scott, J. K.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 198) Invasive species of China and their responses to climate change. Author(s): Li Bo, Wei ShuJuan, Li Hui, Yang Qiang, Lu Meng
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 219) Identifying invasive species in real time: early detection and distribution mapping system (EDDMapS) and other mapping tools. Author(s): Wallace, R. D., Bargeron, C. T.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 232) Global identification of invasive species: the CABI Invasive Species Compendium as a resource. Author(s): Diaz-Soltero, H., Scott, P. R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 240) The biogeography of invasive plants - projecting range shifts with climate change. Author(s): Bradley, B. A.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 253) Identifying climate change as a factor in the establishment and persistence of invasive weeds in agricultural crops. Author(s): DiTommaso, A., Zhong Qin, Clements, D. R.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 271) Assessing and managing the impact of climate change on invasive species: the PBDM approach. Author(s): Gutierrez, A. P., Ponti, L.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 293) Climate, CO2 and invasive weed management. Author(s): Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 305) Early detection and rapid response: a cost-effective strategy for minimizing the establishment and spread of new and emerging invasive plants by global trade, travel and climate change. Author(s): Westbrooks, R. G., Manning, S. T., Waugh, J. D.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 326) Adapting to invasions in a changing world: invasive species as an economic resource. Author(s): Barnes, M. A., Deines, A. M., Gentile, R. M., Grieneisen, L. E.