Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Invasive species and global climate change.

Book cover for Invasive species and global climate change.

Description

This book is part of the "CABI Invasive Series", which addresses all topics relating to invasive species, including biosecurity surveillance, mapping and modelling, economics of invasive species and species interactions in plant invasions. Aimed at researchers, upper-level students and policy makers, titles in the series provide international coverage of topics related to invasive species, includi...

Chapter 9 (Page no: 129)

Climate change and alien species in South Africa.

South Africa has a long history of human-mediated introductions of species from all major taxonomic groups. Close to 9000 alien terrestrial plant species have been introduced, and all of the country's biomes have already been invaded. Invasive species are threatening the country's ecosystems in numerous ways, but the effect of climate change on these invasions is predicted to be complex and cascading and remains poorly understood. The relationship between climate and invasive species biology is well established, and there is no question that climate change will influence the ecology of invasive species significantly. If left un-managed, these effects are expected to increase substantially. Besides terrestrial plants, numerous animals have also invaded the country's landscapes. South Africa's freshwater ecosystems have been invaded by both alien as well as extralimital introductions (indigenous species outside their historical extent of occurrence). The status of invasion in the marine environment remains poorly studied, and knowledge of the status of invasions and predictions regarding the impacts of climate change remain largely speculative. This chapter highlights the current status of invasions in South Africa and discusses some of the direct and indirect effects climate change is likely to have on these invasions.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Introduction. Author(s): Dukes, J. S., Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 9) Communicating the dynamic complexities of climate and ecology: species invasion and resource changes. Author(s): Thompson, J. P., Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 22) Climate change and plant pathogen invasions. Author(s): Garrett, K. A., Thomas-Sharma, S., Forbes, G. A., Nopsa, J. H.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 45) Analysis of invasive insects: links to climate change. Author(s): Gutierrez, A. P., Ponti, L.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 62) Climate change, plant traits and invasion in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Author(s): Blumenthal, D. M., Kray, J. A.
Chapter: 6 (Page no: 81) Non-native species in Antarctic terrestrial environments: the impacts of climate change and human activity. Author(s): Hughes, K. A., Convey, P.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 101) Synergies between climate change and species invasions: evidence from marine systems. Author(s): Sorte, C. J. B.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 117) Ragweed in Eastern Europe. Author(s): Makra, L., Matyasovszky, I., Deák, Á. J.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 148) Climate change and 'Alien Species in National Parks': revisited. Author(s): Stohlgren, T. J., Resnik, J. R., Plumb, G. E.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 169) Invasive plants in a rapidly changing climate: an Australian perspective. Author(s): Webber, B. L., Klinken, R. D. van, Scott, J. K.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 198) Invasive species of China and their responses to climate change. Author(s): Li Bo, Wei ShuJuan, Li Hui, Yang Qiang, Lu Meng
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 219) Identifying invasive species in real time: early detection and distribution mapping system (EDDMapS) and other mapping tools. Author(s): Wallace, R. D., Bargeron, C. T.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 232) Global identification of invasive species: the CABI Invasive Species Compendium as a resource. Author(s): Diaz-Soltero, H., Scott, P. R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 240) The biogeography of invasive plants - projecting range shifts with climate change. Author(s): Bradley, B. A.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 253) Identifying climate change as a factor in the establishment and persistence of invasive weeds in agricultural crops. Author(s): DiTommaso, A., Zhong Qin, Clements, D. R.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 271) Assessing and managing the impact of climate change on invasive species: the PBDM approach. Author(s): Gutierrez, A. P., Ponti, L.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 293) Climate, CO2 and invasive weed management. Author(s): Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 305) Early detection and rapid response: a cost-effective strategy for minimizing the establishment and spread of new and emerging invasive plants by global trade, travel and climate change. Author(s): Westbrooks, R. G., Manning, S. T., Waugh, J. D.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 326) Adapting to invasions in a changing world: invasive species as an economic resource. Author(s): Barnes, M. A., Deines, A. M., Gentile, R. M., Grieneisen, L. E.