Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

CABI Book Chapter

Invasive species and global climate change.

Book cover for Invasive species and global climate change.

Description

This book is part of the "CABI Invasive Series", which addresses all topics relating to invasive species, including biosecurity surveillance, mapping and modelling, economics of invasive species and species interactions in plant invasions. Aimed at researchers, upper-level students and policy makers, titles in the series provide international coverage of topics related to invasive species, includi...

Chapter 6 (Page no: 81)

Non-native species in Antarctic terrestrial environments: the impacts of climate change and human activity.

Antarctic terrestrial biodiversity is simple compared to other regions of the Earth, with many higher taxonomic groups not represented, due to the continent's isolation, the severe climatic conditions and the relative scarcity of suitable habitats. So far, Antarctic biodiversity has been little affected by nonnative species introductions, due to (i) the late arrival of humans on the continent (c.1820), (ii) the overall low intensity of human activity and (iii) the concentration of most of that activity around a limited number of research stations and tourist sites, such as exist on the Antarctic Peninsula. However, human activity is increasing, and Antarctica is increasingly vulnerable to the human-mediated importation of non-native species and the redistribution of indigenous Antarctic species. While the Antarctic Peninsula is one of the most rapidly warming regions on the planet, the Antarctic continent has, so far, experienced relatively little climatic change, but this is expected to change over the next century. Consequently, terrestrial communities are increasingly vulnerable, as climate change increases the risk of non-native species establishment and dispersal. This chapter describes non-native species in Antarctica that have already become established. Also described are the eradications that have been attempted and the practicality of minimizing microbial introductions. Finally, the chapter discusses recent policy developments relating to nonnative species and suggests that more needs to be done by the Antarctic Treaty Parties to implement biosecurity practices and eradicate existing non-native colonists, before fragile Antarctic communities are changed irreversibly.

Other chapters from this book

Chapter: 1 (Page no: 1) Introduction. Author(s): Dukes, J. S., Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 2 (Page no: 9) Communicating the dynamic complexities of climate and ecology: species invasion and resource changes. Author(s): Thompson, J. P., Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 3 (Page no: 22) Climate change and plant pathogen invasions. Author(s): Garrett, K. A., Thomas-Sharma, S., Forbes, G. A., Nopsa, J. H.
Chapter: 4 (Page no: 45) Analysis of invasive insects: links to climate change. Author(s): Gutierrez, A. P., Ponti, L.
Chapter: 5 (Page no: 62) Climate change, plant traits and invasion in natural and agricultural ecosystems. Author(s): Blumenthal, D. M., Kray, J. A.
Chapter: 7 (Page no: 101) Synergies between climate change and species invasions: evidence from marine systems. Author(s): Sorte, C. J. B.
Chapter: 8 (Page no: 117) Ragweed in Eastern Europe. Author(s): Makra, L., Matyasovszky, I., Deák, Á. J.
Chapter: 9 (Page no: 129) Climate change and alien species in South Africa. Author(s): Irlich, U. M., Richardson, D. M., Davies, S. J., Chown, S. L.
Chapter: 10 (Page no: 148) Climate change and 'Alien Species in National Parks': revisited. Author(s): Stohlgren, T. J., Resnik, J. R., Plumb, G. E.
Chapter: 11 (Page no: 169) Invasive plants in a rapidly changing climate: an Australian perspective. Author(s): Webber, B. L., Klinken, R. D. van, Scott, J. K.
Chapter: 12 (Page no: 198) Invasive species of China and their responses to climate change. Author(s): Li Bo, Wei ShuJuan, Li Hui, Yang Qiang, Lu Meng
Chapter: 13 (Page no: 219) Identifying invasive species in real time: early detection and distribution mapping system (EDDMapS) and other mapping tools. Author(s): Wallace, R. D., Bargeron, C. T.
Chapter: 14 (Page no: 232) Global identification of invasive species: the CABI Invasive Species Compendium as a resource. Author(s): Diaz-Soltero, H., Scott, P. R.
Chapter: 15 (Page no: 240) The biogeography of invasive plants - projecting range shifts with climate change. Author(s): Bradley, B. A.
Chapter: 16 (Page no: 253) Identifying climate change as a factor in the establishment and persistence of invasive weeds in agricultural crops. Author(s): DiTommaso, A., Zhong Qin, Clements, D. R.
Chapter: 17 (Page no: 271) Assessing and managing the impact of climate change on invasive species: the PBDM approach. Author(s): Gutierrez, A. P., Ponti, L.
Chapter: 18 (Page no: 293) Climate, CO2 and invasive weed management. Author(s): Ziska, L. H.
Chapter: 19 (Page no: 305) Early detection and rapid response: a cost-effective strategy for minimizing the establishment and spread of new and emerging invasive plants by global trade, travel and climate change. Author(s): Westbrooks, R. G., Manning, S. T., Waugh, J. D.
Chapter: 20 (Page no: 326) Adapting to invasions in a changing world: invasive species as an economic resource. Author(s): Barnes, M. A., Deines, A. M., Gentile, R. M., Grieneisen, L. E.