Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Taxus brevifolia
(Pacific yew)

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Datasheet

Taxus brevifolia (Pacific yew)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 14 July 2018
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Host Plant
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Taxus brevifolia
  • Preferred Common Name
  • Pacific yew
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Plantae
  •     Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •       Subphylum: Gymnospermae
  •         Class: Taxopsida
  • Uses List
  • Agroforestry
  • Boundary, barrier or support
  • Carved material
  • Miscellaneous materials
  • Ornamental

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Pacific yew is a very shade-tolerant tree species that establishes, grows, and reproduces in low light conditions of forest understories.
TitleTree
CaptionPacific yew is a very shade-tolerant tree species that establishes, grows, and reproduces in low light conditions of forest understories.
CopyrightJ. Worrall
Pacific yew is a very shade-tolerant tree species that establishes, grows, and reproduces in low light conditions of forest understories.
TreePacific yew is a very shade-tolerant tree species that establishes, grows, and reproduces in low light conditions of forest understories. J. Worrall
The bark of Pacific yew is distinctively scaly, knobby and red, especially when wet.
TitleBark
CaptionThe bark of Pacific yew is distinctively scaly, knobby and red, especially when wet.
CopyrightJ. Worrall
The bark of Pacific yew is distinctively scaly, knobby and red, especially when wet.
BarkThe bark of Pacific yew is distinctively scaly, knobby and red, especially when wet.J. Worrall
The Pacific yew is dioecious; male strobili can be seen on this tree.
TitleFoliage and strobili
CaptionThe Pacific yew is dioecious; male strobili can be seen on this tree.
CopyrightJ. Worrall
The Pacific yew is dioecious; male strobili can be seen on this tree.
Foliage and strobiliThe Pacific yew is dioecious; male strobili can be seen on this tree.J. Worrall
Pacific yew is a gymnosperm and so these structures are not berries. The red, fleshy aril partially surrounds a very poisonous seed.
TitleAril
CaptionPacific yew is a gymnosperm and so these structures are not berries. The red, fleshy aril partially surrounds a very poisonous seed.
CopyrightJ. Worrall
Pacific yew is a gymnosperm and so these structures are not berries. The red, fleshy aril partially surrounds a very poisonous seed.
ArilPacific yew is a gymnosperm and so these structures are not berries. The red, fleshy aril partially surrounds a very poisonous seed.J. Worrall

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Taxus brevifolia Nutt.

Preferred Common Name

  • Pacific yew

International Common Names

  • French: if de Californie

Local Common Names

  • Canada: western yew
  • Germany: Kurzblaettrige Eibe
  • USA: mountain mahogany; western yew

EPPO code

  • TAXBR (Taxus brevifolia)

Trade name

  • yew

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Plantae
  •         Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •             Subphylum: Gymnospermae
  •                 Class: Taxopsida
  •                     Family: Taxaceae
  •                         Genus: Taxus
  •                             Species: Taxus brevifolia

Uses List

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Environmental

  • Agroforestry
  • Boundary, barrier or support

General

  • Ornamental

Materials

  • Carved material
  • Miscellaneous materials
  • Poisonous to mammals
  • Wood/timber

Medicinal, pharmaceutical

  • Source of medicine/pharmaceutical
  • Traditional/folklore

Wood Products

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Boats

Furniture

Sawn or hewn building timbers

  • Exterior fittings
  • Fences

Woodware

  • Cutlery
  • Industrial and domestic woodware
  • Sports equipment
  • Tool handles
  • Wood carvings