Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Podosphaera pannosa
(powdery mildew of rose)

Toolbox

Datasheet

Podosphaera pannosa (powdery mildew of rose)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 22 November 2019
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Pest
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Podosphaera pannosa
  • Preferred Common Name
  • powdery mildew of rose
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Fungi
  •     Phylum: Ascomycota
  •       Subphylum: Pezizomycotina
  •         Class: Leotiomycetes
  • Summary of Invasiveness
  • The genus Rosa, comprising about 150 species, is distributed in Asia, Europe, North Africa and North America. The origin of the rose powdery mildew, P. pannosa, is unclear. In any case, it is a common, widespread disease, probably known to attack orn...
  • There are no pictures available for this datasheet

    If you can supply pictures for this datasheet please contact:

    Compendia
    CAB International
    Wallingford
    Oxfordshire
    OX10 8DE
    UK
    compend@cabi.org
  • Distribution map More information

Don't need the entire report?

Generate a print friendly version containing only the sections you need.

Generate report

Pictures

Top of page
PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Symptoms of S. pannosa on peach (Andross) leaves.
TitleSymptoms on peach
CaptionSymptoms of S. pannosa on peach (Andross) leaves.
CopyrightAntonia Ivascu
Symptoms of S. pannosa on peach (Andross) leaves.
Symptoms on peachSymptoms of S. pannosa on peach (Andross) leaves.Antonia Ivascu

Identity

Top of page

Preferred Scientific Name

  • Podosphaera pannosa (Wallr.) de Bary

Preferred Common Name

  • powdery mildew of rose

Other Scientific Names

  • ?Oidium forsythiae Bunkina
  • Alphitomorpha pannosa Wallr.
  • Erysiphe pannosa (Wallr.) Fr.
  • Oidium leucoconium Desm.
  • Sphaerotheca macularis f. rosae Jacz.
  • Sphaerotheca pannosa (Wallr.) Lév.
  • Sphaerotheca pannosa var. persicae Woron.
  • Sphaerotheca pannosa var. rosae Woron.
  • Sphaerotheca persicae (Woron.) Erikss.
  • Sphaerotheca rosae (Jacz.) Z.Y. Zhao

International Common Names

  • English: powdery mildew of peach
  • Spanish: oidio del rosal
  • French: blanc du pêcher; blanc du rosier; oïdium du pêcher; oïdium du rosier

Local Common Names

  • Germany: Mehltau: Rose

EPPO code

  • SPHRPA (Podosphaera pannosa)

Summary of Invasiveness

Top of page The genus Rosa, comprising about 150 species, is distributed in Asia, Europe, North Africa and North America. The origin of the rose powdery mildew, P. pannosa, is unclear. In any case, it is a common, widespread disease, probably known to attack ornamental roses for centuries since roses have been cultivated. P. pannosa is currently a cosmopolitan powdery mildew, following cultivations of roses and peach worldwide. These facts indicate that it has to be considered invasive. The disease used to occur rapidly in new areas in which roses or peach were planted.

Taxonomic Tree

Top of page
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Fungi
  •         Phylum: Ascomycota
  •             Subphylum: Pezizomycotina
  •                 Class: Leotiomycetes
  •                     Order: Erysiphales
  •                         Family: Erysiphaceae
  •                             Genus: Podosphaera
  •                                 Species: Podosphaera pannosa

Distribution Table

Top of page

The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Last updated: 10 Jan 2020
Continent/Country/Region Distribution Last Reported Origin First Reported Invasive Reference Notes

Africa

AngolaPresentAmano (1986)
Congo, Republic of thePresentAmano (1986)
EgyptPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
EthiopiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
KenyaPresentNattrass (1961); Amano (1986)
LibyaPresentAmano (1986)
MalawiPresentPeregrine and Siddiqi (1972)
MauritaniaPresentAmano (1986)
MoroccoPresentAmano (1986)
MozambiquePresentAmano (1986)
NigerPresentAmano (1986)
SenegalPresentAmano (1986)
South AfricaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
TanzaniaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
UgandaPresentAmano (1986)
ZambiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
ZimbabwePresentCABI and EPPO (2001)

Asia

AfghanistanPresentAmano (1986)
ArmeniaPresentAmano (1986)
AzerbaijanPresentAmano (1986)
BhutanPresentAmano (1986)
BruneiPresentAmano (1986)
ChinaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-HeilongjiangPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-LiaoningPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
GeorgiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
IndiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-AssamPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-DelhiPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-GujaratPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-Himachal PradeshPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-Jammu and KashmirPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-KarnatakaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-MaharashtraPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-MeghalayaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-RajasthanPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-Uttar PradeshPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-West BengalPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
IndonesiaPresentAmano (1986)
IranPresentCABI and EPPO (2001); Baradaran et al. (2012)
IraqPresentAmano (1986)
IsraelPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
JapanPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
KazakhstanPresentAmano (1986); Valiyeva et al. (2005)
KyrgyzstanPresentAmano (1986)
LebanonPresentAmano (1986)
MongoliaPresentAmano (1986)
MyanmarPresentAmano (1986)
NepalPresentAmano (1986); Dahal et al. (1992)
OmanPresentAl-Sadi et al. (2012)
PakistanPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
Saudi ArabiaPresentAmano (1986)
South KoreaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
Sri LankaPresentAmano (1986)
TaiwanPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
TajikistanPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
ThailandPresentAmano (1986)
TurkeyPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
TurkmenistanPresentAmano (1986)
UzbekistanPresentAmano (1986)
VietnamPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
YemenPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)

Europe

AustriaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
BelarusPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
BelgiumPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
BulgariaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
CyprusPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
CzechiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
DenmarkPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
EstoniaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
Federal Republic of YugoslaviaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
FinlandPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
FrancePresentCABI and EPPO (2001); Hubert et al. (2012)
GermanyPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
GreecePresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
HungaryPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
ItalyPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
LatviaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
LithuaniaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
MoldovaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
NetherlandsPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
North MacedoniaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
NorwayPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
PolandPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
PortugalPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
RomaniaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
RussiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-Central RussiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-Southern RussiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-Western SiberiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
SlovakiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
SpainPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
SwedenPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
SwitzerlandPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
UkrainePresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
United KingdomPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)

North America

CanadaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-British ColumbiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-SaskatchewanPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
Costa RicaPresentAmano (1986)
Dominican RepublicPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
El SalvadorPresentAmano (1986)
GuatemalaPresentAmano (1986)
HaitiPresentAmano (1986)
HondurasPresentAmano (1986)
MexicoPresentAmano (1986); CABI and EPPO (2001); Félix-Gastélum et al. (2014)
Puerto RicoPresentAmano (1986)
United StatesPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-AlabamaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-AlaskaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-CaliforniaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-ConnecticutPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-FloridaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-GeorgiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-HawaiiPresentCABI and EPPO (2001); Romberg et al. (2014)
-IdahoPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-KansasPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-KentuckyPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-MarylandPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-MichiganPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-MinnesotaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-MississippiPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-MontanaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-New JerseyPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-New YorkPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-North CarolinaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-North DakotaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-OhioPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-OklahomaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-OregonPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-South DakotaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-WashingtonPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)

Oceania

AustraliaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-New South WalesPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
New CaledoniaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
New ZealandPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)

South America

ArgentinaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
BoliviaPresentAmano (1986)
BrazilPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-ParanaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
-Sao PauloPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
ChilePresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
ColombiaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)
EcuadorPresentAmano (1986)
GuyanaPresentAmano (1986)
ParaguayPresentAmano (1986)
PeruPresentAmano (1986)
UruguayPresentAmano (1986)
VenezuelaPresentCABI and EPPO (2001)

List of Symptoms/Signs

Top of page
SignLife StagesType
Fruit / discoloration
Fruit / extensive mould
Leaves / abnormal colours
Leaves / abnormal forms
Leaves / abnormal leaf fall
Leaves / fungal growth
Stems / mycelium present

Plant Trade

Top of page
Plant parts liable to carry the pest in trade/transportPest stagesBorne internallyBorne externallyVisibility of pest or symptoms
Bark hyphae; spores
Flowers/Inflorescences/Cones/Calyx fruiting bodies; hyphae; spores Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Fruits (inc. pods) hyphae; spores Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Stems (above ground)/Shoots/Trunks/Branches fruiting bodies; hyphae; spores Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Plant parts not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Bulbs/Tubers/Corms/Rhizomes
Growing medium accompanying plants
Leaves
Roots
Seedlings/Micropropagated plants
True seeds (inc. grain)
Wood

References

Top of page

Agrios GN, 1997. Plant Pathology. San Diego, USA: Academic Press.

Al-Sadi AM; Al-Raisi IJ; Al-Azri M; Al-Hasani H; Al-Shukaili MS; Al-Shuraiqi SM; Al-Fahdi KO; Deadman ML, 2012. Population structure and management of Podosphaera pannosa associated with peach powdery mildew in Oman. Journal of Phytopathology, 160(11/12):647-654. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1439-0434

Amano K, 1986. Host range and geographical distribution of the powdery mildew fungi. Tokyo, Japan; Japan Scientific Societies Press, 741 pp.

Anon, 1996. The Ohio State University Extension Fact Sheets, Plant Pathology. Controlling Rose Diseases HYG-3063-96. World Wide Web page at http://ohioline.osu.edu/hyg-fact/3000/3036.html.

Anon, 2001. How to Manage pests. Pests in Landscapes and Gardens. Powdery Mildew on Fruits and Berries. World Wide Web page at http://www. ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7494.html.

Baradaran GR; Aminaee MM; Assari MJ, 2012. Identification of fungal diseases of Rosa damascena in Kerman province of Iran. Archives of Phytopathology and Plant Protection, 45(9):1087-1095. http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/gapp20

Blumer S, 1967. Echte Mehltaupilze (Erysiphaceae) Ein Bestimmungsbuch für die in Europa Vorkommenden Arten. Jena, Germany: Gustav Fischer Verlag.

Boesewinkel HJ, 1979. Differences between the conidial states of Podosphaera tridactyla and Sphaerotheca pannosa. Annales de Phytopathologie, 11(4):525-527

Boesewinkel HJ, 1981. A first recording of rose mildew, Sphaerotheca pannosa, on three species of Eucalyptus. Nova Hedwigia, 34(3/4):721-730

Bolay A, 2005. Les Oïdiums de Suisse (Eryssiphacées). Cryptogamica Helvetica, 20:1-173.

Bouwens H, 1924. Untersuchungen über Erysipheen. Mededeelingen uit het Phytopathologisch Laboratorium "Willie Commelin Scholten", 8:1-47.

Braun U, 1987. A monograph of the Erysiphales (powdery mildews). Beihefte zur Nova Hedwigia, 89:700 pp.

Braun U, 1995. The powdery mildews (Erysiphales) of Europe. The powdery mildews (Erysiphales) of Europe., 337 pp.; many ref.

Braun U, 1998. Neufunde Echter Mehltaupilze (Erysiphales) aus der BR Deutschland. Schlechtendalia, 1:31-40.

Braun U; Cook RTA; Inman AJ; Shin HD, 2002. The taxonomy of the powdery mildew fungi. The powdery mildews: a comprehensive treatise, 13-55; many ref.

Braun U; Takamatsu S, 2000. Phylogeny of Erysiphe, Microsphaera, Uncinula (Erysipheae) and Cystotheca, Podosphaera, Sphaerotheca (Cystotheceae) inferred from rDNA ITS sequences - some taxonomic consequences. Schlechtendalia, No.4:1-33; 11 ref.

Burchill RT, 1978. Powdery mildews on tree crops. In: Spencer DM, ed. The Powdery Mildews. London, New York, San Francisco: Academic Press, 473-493.

Butt DJ, 1978. Epidemiology of powdery mildews. In: Spencer DM, ed. The Powdery Mildews. London, UK: Academic Press, 51-77.

CABI/EPPO, 2001. Podosphaera pannosa. Distribution Maps of Plant Diseases, No. 843, edition 1. Wallingford, UK: CAB International.

Childs JFL, 1940. Diurnal cycle of spore maturation in certain powdery mildews. Phytopathology, 30:65-73.

Cook RTA; Inman AJ; Billings C, 1997. Identification and classification of powdery mildew anamorphs using light and scanning electron microscopy and host range data. Mycological Research, 101(8):975-1002; 25 ref.

Corner EJH, 1935. Observations on resistance of powdery mildews. New Phytologist, 34:180-200.

Crous PW; Phillips AJL; Baxter AP, 2000. Phytopathogenic fungi from South Africa. Stellenbosch, South Africa: University of Stelenbosch Printers.

Dahal G; Amatya P; Manandhar HK, 1992. Plant diseases in Nepal. Review of Plant Pathology, 71(11):797-807

Douglas SM, 1997. List of Common Diseases and Insect Pests of Rhododendrons. The Connecticut Agricultural Experiment Station PP038 (12/97 R). http://wwwcaes.state-ct.us/FactSheetsFile/PlantPathology/fspp038f.html.

Eken C, 2005. A review of biological control of rose powdery mildew (Sphaerotheca pannosa var. rosae) by fungal antagonists. Acta Horticulturae (ISHS), 690:193-196.

Eriksson J, 1926. Die Pilzkrankheiten der Kulturgewächse. I. Teil. Stuttgart, Germany: Franckh´sche Verlagsbuchhandlung.

Félix-Gastélum R; Herrera-Rodríguez G; Martínez-Valenzuela C; Maldonado-Mendoza IE; Quiroz-Figueroa FR; Brito-Vega H; Espinosa-Matías S, 2014. First report of powdery mildew (Podosphaera pannosa) of roses in Sinaloa, Mexico. Plant Disease, 98(10):1442-1443. http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/loi/pdis

Flint H, 2001. Pests of the Garden and Small Farm: A Grower´s Guide to use less Pesticides. 2nd Ed. University of California Agriculture and Natural Resources Publication 3332:1-286.

Hirata T; Cunnington JH; Paksiri U; Limkaisang S; Shishkoff N; Grigaliunaite B; Sato Y; Takamatsu S, 2000. Evolutionary analysis of subsection Magnicellulatae of Podosphaera section Sphaerotheca (Erysiphales) based on the rDNA internal transcribed spacer sequences with special reference to host plants. Canadian Journal of Botany, 78(12):1521-1530; 35 ref.

Hubert J; Fourrier C; Payen C; Fournié JL; Ioos R, 2012. First report of powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera pannosa on Prunus cerasus in France. Plant Disease, 96(9):1375-1376. http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/loi/pdis

Ialongo MT, 1981. Indagini sulla specializzazione biologica di una populazione di Sphaerotheca pannosa ([Wallr.] Fr.) Lév. var. persicae Woron. Annali dell´Istituto Sperimentale per la Patologia Vegetale, 7:59-63.

Ialongo MT; Simeone AM, 1984. Attack of powdery mildew due to two Erysiphaceae in succession on apricot (Prunus armeniaca). Informatore Fitopatologico, 34(12):31-33

Kiss L, 2003. A review of fungal antagonists of powdery mildews and their potential as biocontrol agents. Pest Management Science, 59(4):475-483; 98 ref.

Kiss L; Russell JC; Szentiványi O; Xu X; Jeffries P, 2004. Biology and biocontrol potential of Ampelomyces mycoparasites, natural antagonists of powdery mildew fungi. Biocontrol Science and Technology, 14:635-651.

Li X; Gasic K; Cammue B; Broekaert W; Korba SS, 2003. Transgenic rose lines haboring an antimicrobial protein gene, Ace-AMP1, demonstrate enhanced resistance to powdery mildew (Sphaerotheca pannosa). Planta, 218(2):226-232.

Linde M; Debener T, 2003. Isolation and identification of eight races of powdery mildew of rose (Podosphaera pannosa (Wallr.: Fr.) de Bary) and the genetic analysis of the resistance gene Rpp1. Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 107(2):256-262.

Linde M; Mattiesch L; Debener T, 2004. Rpp1, a dominant gene providing race-specific resistance to rose powdery mildew (Podosphaera pannosa): molecular mapping, SCAR development and confirmation of disease resistance data. Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 109(6):1261-1266.

Lyr H, 1987. Modern Selective Fungicides. Jena, Germany: Gustav Fischer Verlag.

Nattrass RM, 1961. Host lists of Kenya fungi and bacteria. Mycol. Pap. Commonw. Mycol. Inst. No. 81, 1961. pp. 46. 16 refs.

Peregrine WTH; Kassim bin Ahmad, 1982. Brunei: a first annotated list of plant diseases and associated organisms. Phytopathological Paper Commonwealth Mycological Institute Kew, Richmond, Surrey UK, No.27:87 pp.

Peregrine WTH; Siddiqi MA, 1972. A revised and annotated list of plant diseases in Malawi. Wallingford, UK: CAB International, Phytopathology Paper, 16.

Romberg MK; Kennedy AH; Ko M, 2014. First report of the powdery mildews Leveillula taurica and Podosphaera pannosa on Rose periwinkle in the United States. Plant Disease, 98(6):848. http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/loi/pdis

Saenz GS; Taylor JW, 1999. Phylogeny of the Erysiphales (powdery mildews) inferred from internal transcribed spacer ribosomal DNA sequences. Canadian Journal of Botany, 77(1):150-168; 50 ref.

Silva MDD; Alfenas AC; Maffia LA; Zauza EAV, 2001. Aetiology of powdery mildew disease of eucalyptus. Fitopatologia Brasileira, 26(2):201-205; 20 ref.

Silva MDD; Alfenas AC; Maffia LA; Zauza EAV, 2001. Germinação de Conídios de Sphaerotheca pannosa Obtidos de Eucalypto. Fitopatologia Bralileira, 28:674-681.

Takamatsu S; Hirata T; Sato Y, 2000. A parasitic transition from trees to herbs occurred at least twice in tribe Cystotheceae (Erysiphaceae): evidence from nuclear ribosomal DNA. Mycological Research, 104(11):1304-1311; 29 ref.

Toma S; Ivascu A; Oprea M, 1998. Highlights of epidemiology of the fungus Sphaerotheca pannosa (Wallr.) Lev. var. persicae Woron in the southern zone of Romania. Acta Horticulturae, No. 465, 2:709-714; 5 ref.

Valiyeva B; Rakhmanova E; Byzova Z, 2005. Fungi occurring on Rosa spp. in Kazakhstan. Acta Horticulturae, 690:175-180.

Viennot Bourgin G, 1949. Les Champignons parasites. Masson et Cie, eds. Boulevard Saint-Germain, Paris, France: Libraires de l'Académie de Médicine.

Watling R, 1985. Rhodendron-mildews in Scotland. Sydowia, 38:339-357

Wheeler BEJ, 1978. Powdery mildew of ornamentals. In: Spencer DM, ed. The Powdery Mildews. London, New York, San Francisco: Academic Press, 411-445.

Woronichine N, 1914. Quelques remarques sur le champignon du blanc de pêcher. Bulletin de Société Mycologique de France, 30:391-401.

Yarwood CE, 1952. Apricot powdery mildew from rose to peach. Bulletin of the California Department of Agriculture, 41:19-25.

Distribution References

Al-Sadi A M, Al-Raisi I J, Al-Azri M, Al-Hasani H, Al-Shukaili M S, Al-Shuraiqi S M, Al-Fahdi K O, Deadman M L, 2012. Population structure and management of Podosphaera pannosa associated with peach powdery mildew in Oman. Journal of Phytopathology. 160 (11/12), 647-654. http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/journal/10.1111/(ISSN)1439-0434 DOI:10.1111/j.1439-0434.2012.01955.x

Amano K, 1986. Host range and geographical distribution of the powdery mildew fungi. Tokyo, Japan: Japan Scientific Societies Press. 741 pp.

Baradaran G R, Aminaee M M, Assari M J, 2012. Identification of fungal diseases of Rosa damascena in Kerman province of Iran. Archives of Phytopathology and Plant Protection. 45 (9), 1087-1095. http://www.tandfonline.com/loi/gapp20 DOI:10.1080/03235408.2012.657891

CABI, EPPO, 2001. Podosphaera pannosa. [Distribution map]. In: Distribution Maps of Plant Diseases, Wallingford, UK: CAB International. Map 843.

CABI, Undated. CABI Compendium: Status as determined by CABI editor. Wallingford, UK: CABI

Dahal G, Amatya P, Manandhar H K, 1992. Plant diseases in Nepal. Review of Plant Pathology. 71 (11), 797-807.

Félix-Gastélum R, Herrera-Rodríguez G, Martínez-Valenzuela C, Maldonado-Mendoza I E, Quiroz-Figueroa F R, Brito-Vega H, Espinosa-Matías S, 2014. First report of powdery mildew (Podosphaera pannosa) of roses in Sinaloa, Mexico. Plant Disease. 98 (10), 1442-1443. http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/loi/pdis DOI:10.1094/PDIS-06-14-0605-PDN

Hubert J, Fourrier C, Payen C, Fournié J L, Ioos R, 2012. First report of powdery mildew caused by Podosphaera pannosa on Prunus cerasus in France. Plant Disease. 96 (9), 1375-1376. http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/loi/pdis DOI:10.1094/PDIS-02-12-0218-PDN

Nattrass R M, 1961. Mycological Papers, 46.

Peregrine W T H, Siddiqi M A, 1972. A revised and annotated list of plant diseases in Malawi. In: Phytopathological Papers, Kew, Surrey, UK: Commonwealth Mycological Institute. 51 pp.

Romberg M K, Kennedy A H, Ko M, 2014. First report of the powdery mildews Leveillula taurica and Podosphaera pannosa on Rose periwinkle in the United States. Plant Disease. 98 (6), 848. http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/loi/pdis DOI:10.1094/PDIS-09-13-0981-PDN

Valiyeva B, Rakhimova E, Byzova Z, 2005. Fungi occurring on Rosa spp. in Kazakhstan. Acta Horticulturae. 175-180. http://www.actahort.org

Distribution Maps

Top of page
You can pan and zoom the map
Save map