Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Pinus ponderosa
(ponderosa pine)

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Datasheet

Pinus ponderosa (ponderosa pine)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 29 March 2018
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Host Plant
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Pinus ponderosa
  • Preferred Common Name
  • ponderosa pine
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Plantae
  •     Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •       Subphylum: Gymnospermae
  •         Class: Pinopsida
  • Uses List
  • Agroforestry
  • Erosion control or dune stabilization
  • Fuelwood
  • Ornamental
  • Shade and shelter

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
P. ponderosa - extends in range from southern-interior BC to Mexico. An exceptional, old-growth P. ponderosa mixed-species stand in the Klammath Falls area, California.
TitleMature stand
CaptionP. ponderosa - extends in range from southern-interior BC to Mexico. An exceptional, old-growth P. ponderosa mixed-species stand in the Klammath Falls area, California.
CopyrightK. Klinka
P. ponderosa - extends in range from southern-interior BC to Mexico. An exceptional, old-growth P. ponderosa mixed-species stand in the Klammath Falls area, California.
Mature standP. ponderosa - extends in range from southern-interior BC to Mexico. An exceptional, old-growth P. ponderosa mixed-species stand in the Klammath Falls area, California.K. Klinka
Open-canopy, irregular mixtures of Pseudotsuga menziesii and P. ponderosa are very common within drier temperate climates of Western North America. The species composition and stand and age structure are to a large degree controlled by fire.
TitleMixed stand
CaptionOpen-canopy, irregular mixtures of Pseudotsuga menziesii and P. ponderosa are very common within drier temperate climates of Western North America. The species composition and stand and age structure are to a large degree controlled by fire.
CopyrightK. Klinka
Open-canopy, irregular mixtures of Pseudotsuga menziesii and P. ponderosa are very common within drier temperate climates of Western North America. The species composition and stand and age structure are to a large degree controlled by fire.
Mixed standOpen-canopy, irregular mixtures of Pseudotsuga menziesii and P. ponderosa are very common within drier temperate climates of Western North America. The species composition and stand and age structure are to a large degree controlled by fire.K. Klinka
A solitary P.  ponderosa within the grassland landscape of southern British Columbia. Notice the long, live-crown.
TitleOpen-grown tree
CaptionA solitary P. ponderosa within the grassland landscape of southern British Columbia. Notice the long, live-crown.
CopyrightK. Klinka
A solitary P.  ponderosa within the grassland landscape of southern British Columbia. Notice the long, live-crown.
Open-grown treeA solitary P. ponderosa within the grassland landscape of southern British Columbia. Notice the long, live-crown.K. Klinka
The bark of mature ponderosa pine has deep grooves and small 'jigsaw puzzle' patterns on the ridges.
TitleBark
CaptionThe bark of mature ponderosa pine has deep grooves and small 'jigsaw puzzle' patterns on the ridges.
CopyrightJ. Worrall
The bark of mature ponderosa pine has deep grooves and small 'jigsaw puzzle' patterns on the ridges.
BarkThe bark of mature ponderosa pine has deep grooves and small 'jigsaw puzzle' patterns on the ridges.J. Worrall
P. ponderosa has a hefty taproot, which contributes to the cylindrical form of the bole.
TitleRoot system
CaptionP. ponderosa has a hefty taproot, which contributes to the cylindrical form of the bole.
CopyrightJ. Worrall
P. ponderosa has a hefty taproot, which contributes to the cylindrical form of the bole.
Root systemP. ponderosa has a hefty taproot, which contributes to the cylindrical form of the bole.J. Worrall
First-season cones on P. ponderosa. The cones leave some scales on the twig when they fall off, as can be seen in the top-right corner of the photograph.
TitleCones
CaptionFirst-season cones on P. ponderosa. The cones leave some scales on the twig when they fall off, as can be seen in the top-right corner of the photograph.
CopyrightJ. Worrall
First-season cones on P. ponderosa. The cones leave some scales on the twig when they fall off, as can be seen in the top-right corner of the photograph.
ConesFirst-season cones on P. ponderosa. The cones leave some scales on the twig when they fall off, as can be seen in the top-right corner of the photograph.J. Worrall

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Pinus ponderosa Douglas ex Lawson & C. Lawson

Preferred Common Name

  • ponderosa pine

Variety

  • Pinus ponderosa var. ponderosa
  • Pinus ponderosa var. scopulorum Engelm.

Other Scientific Names

  • Pinus brachyptera Engelm.
  • Pinus scopulorum (Engelm.) Lemmon

International Common Names

  • Spanish: pino amarillo
  • French: pin à bois lourd; pin jaune

Local Common Names

  • Canada: yellow pine
  • Germany: gelb Kiefer
  • Italy: pino giallo
  • Mexico: pinabete; pino real
  • Netherlands: gele den; gele pijn
  • USA: Arizona pine; black jack pine; bull pine; Pacific ponderosa pine; Rocky Mountain ponderosa pine; western yellow pine; yellow pine

EPPO code

  • PIUPO (Pinus ponderosa)

Trade name

  • mixed species
  • ponderosa pine-lodgepole pine
  • ponderosa pine-sugar pine
  • western woods
  • white woods

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Plantae
  •         Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •             Subphylum: Gymnospermae
  •                 Class: Pinopsida
  •                     Family: Pinaceae
  •                         Genus: Pinus
  •                             Species: Pinus ponderosa

List of Pests

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Major host of:

Arceuthobium campylopodum (western dwarf misletoe); Armillaria ostoyae (armillaria root rot); Choristoneura lambertiana (sugar pine tortrix); Coloradia pandora (pandora moth); Cronartium comandrae (comandra blister rust); Cronartium comptoniae (sweet fern blister rust); Cydia piperana (ponderosa pine seed moth); Dendroctonus adjunctus (roundheaded pine beetle); Dendroctonus brevicomis (western pine beetle); Dendroctonus ponderosae (black hills beetle); Dendroctonus valens (red turpentine beetle); Dioryctria auranticella (pine cone moth); Diprion similis (white pine sawfly); Endocronartium harknessii (western gall rust); Ips calligraphus (six-spined ips); Ips grandicollis (five-spined bark beetle); Ips lecontei (Arizona five-spined engraver); Ips paraconfusus (California five-spined engraver); Ips pini (pine engraver); Megastigmus albifrons (Montezuma pine seed chalcid); Monochamus obtusus (obtuse sawyer); Mycosphaerella gibsonii (needle blight of pine); Mycosphaerella pini (Dothistroma blight); Neodiprion sertifer (European pine sawfly); Ophiostoma wageneri (black-stain root disease); Petrova metallica (lodgepole pine twig moth); Rhyacionia frustrana (Nantucket pine tip moth); Sirex noctilio (woodwasp); Sirococcus conigenus (sirococcus blight of conifers); Sphaeropsis sapinea (Sphaeropsis blight); Tomicus piniperda (common pine shoot beetle)

Minor host of:

Arceuthobium americanum (lodgepole pine dwarf mistletoe); Arceuthobium laricis (larch dwarf mistletoe); Armillaria mellea (armillaria root rot); Atropellis piniphila (twig blight of pine); Bursaphelenchus xylophilus (pine wilt nematode); Cirsium vulgare (spear thistle); Coleosporium asterum (needle cast: red pine); Cronartium quercuum (pine-oak rust); Cyclaneusma minus (Cyclaneusma needle-cast); Fomitopsis pinicola (brown crumbly rot); Fusarium sporotrichioides (kernel rot of maize); Ganoderma lucidum (basal stem rot: Hevea spp.); Gibberella circinata (pitch canker); Gremmeniella abietina (Brunchorstia disease); Heterobasidion annosum; Heterobasidion annosum sensu lato (Heterobasidion root rot); Heterobasidion parviporum; Ips plastographus (California pine engraver); Leptographium procerum (white pine root decline); Linaria dalmatica (dalmatian toadflax); Monochamus alternatus (Japanese pine sawyer); Mycosphaerella dearnessii (brown spot needle blight); Orgyia pseudotsugata (douglas-fir tussock moth); Pissodes validirostris (pine cone weevil); Pratylenchus penetrans (nematode, northern root lesion); Rhyacionia buoliana (European pine shoot moth); Sirex juvencus (steel-blue woodwasp); Thaumetopoea pityocampa (pine processionary); Thecodiplosis japonensis (pine needle gall midge)

Wild host of:

Longidorus (longidorids)

Associated with (not a host):

Ips confusus (pinyon ips)

Host of (source - data mining):

Cecidomyia piniinopis (jack pine midge); Coleophora laricella (larch casebearer); Conophthorus ponderosae (lodgepole cone beetle); Conotrachelus neomexicanus; Cydia miscitata; Dynaspidiotus californicus (pine-leaf, scale, black); Eucosma sonomana (western pine shoot borer); Exoteleia anomala; Leptoglossus occidentalis (western conifer-seed bug); Melanophila californica (borer, California flatheaded); Neodiprion autumnalis; Neodiprion fulviceps (sawfly, ponderosa pine); Ophiostoma piceaperdum (girdling canker: pine); Otiorhynchus raucus; Rhyacionia adana; Rhyacionia neomexicana (pine, tip moth, southwestern); Rhyacionia zozana; Zadiprion townsendi

Uses List

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Environmental

  • Agroforestry
  • Erosion control or dune stabilization
  • Shade and shelter

Fuels

  • Fuelwood

General

  • Ornamental

Materials

  • Fibre
  • Miscellaneous materials
  • Poisonous to mammals
  • Wood/timber

Wood Products

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Containers

  • Crates
  • Pallets

Furniture

Pulp

  • Short-fibre pulp

Roundwood

  • Posts

Sawn or hewn building timbers

  • Carpentry/joinery (exterior/interior)
  • Flooring
  • For light construction
  • Wall panelling

Veneers

Wood-based materials

  • Particleboard
  • Plywood

Woodware

  • Industrial and domestic woodware