Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Orgyia leucostigma
(white-marked tussock moth)

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Datasheet

Orgyia leucostigma (white-marked tussock moth)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 21 November 2019
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Pest
  • Natural Enemy
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Orgyia leucostigma
  • Preferred Common Name
  • white-marked tussock moth
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Metazoa
  •     Phylum: Arthropoda
  •       Subphylum: Uniramia
  •         Class: Insecta
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    Compendia
    CAB International
    Wallingford
    Oxfordshire
    OX10 8DE
    UK
    compend@cabi.org
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Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Orgyia leucostigma (J.E. Smith, 1797)

Preferred Common Name

  • white-marked tussock moth

Other Scientific Names

  • Acyphas plagiata Walker, 1855
  • Cladophora leucographa Geyer, 1832
  • Hemerocampa leucostigma (J.E. Smith, 1797)
  • Orgyia leucographa var. obliviosa Henry Edwards, 1886
  • Orgyia leucostigma var. borealis Fitch, 1856
  • Orgyia leucostigma var. intermedia Fitch, 1856
  • Orgyia libera Strecker, 1900
  • Orgyia meridionalis Riotte, 1974
  • Orgyia oslari Barnes, 1900
  • Orgyia wardi Riotte, 1971
  • Phalaena leucostigma J.E. Smith, 1797

International Common Names

  • English: tussock moth, white-marked; whitemarked tussock moth
  • French: chenille à houppes blanches

EPPO code

  • HEMELE (Hemerocampa leucostigma)

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Metazoa
  •         Phylum: Arthropoda
  •             Subphylum: Uniramia
  •                 Class: Insecta
  •                     Order: Lepidoptera
  •                         Family: Erebidae
  •                             Genus: Orgyia
  •                                 Species: Orgyia leucostigma

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Last updated: 10 Jan 2020
Continent/Country/Region Distribution Last Reported Origin First Reported Invasive Reference Notes

North America

CanadaPresent, LocalizedNativeFerguson (1978)
-AlbertaPresent, LocalizedNativeFerguson (1978)
-ManitobaPresent, LocalizedNativeFerguson (1978)
-New BrunswickPresent, LocalizedNativeEidt and MacGillivray (1972)
-Newfoundland and LabradorPresent, LocalizedNativeWest et al. (1987)
-Nova ScotiaPresent, LocalizedNativeElgee (1975)
-OntarioPresent, LocalizedNativeFerguson (1978)
-QuebecPresent, LocalizedNativeFerguson (1978)
United StatesPresent, WidespreadNativeFerguson (1978)
-AlabamaPresent, WidespreadNativeFerguson (1978)
-ArkansasPresent, WidespreadNativeFerguson (1978)
-ColoradoPresent, LocalizedNativeFerguson (1978)
-FloridaPresent, WidespreadNativeDixon and Foltz (1991)
-GeorgiaPresent, WidespreadNativeFerguson (1978)
-IowaPresent, WidespreadNativeFerguson (1978)
-KansasPresent, LocalizedNativeFerguson (1978)
-LouisianaPresent, WidespreadNativeFerguson (1978)
-MainePresent, WidespreadNativeFerguson (1978)
-MarylandPresent, WidespreadNativeMedina and Barbosa (2002)
-MichiganPresent, WidespreadNativeWilson (1991)
-MississippiPresent, WidespreadNativeThompson and Solomon (1986)
-MissouriPresent, WidespreadNativeRichard and Heitzman (1987)
-New JerseyPresent, WidespreadNativeFerguson (1978)
-New MexicoPresent, LocalizedNativeFerguson (1978)
-New YorkPresent, WidespreadNativeFerguson (1978)
-South CarolinaPresent, WidespreadNativeFerguson (1978)
-TexasPresent, WidespreadNativeFerguson (1978)
-VirginiaPresent, WidespreadNativeFerguson (1978)
-West VirginiaPresentHajek et al. (2004)

List of Symptoms/Signs

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SignLife StagesType
Growing point / external feeding
Growing point / external feeding
Leaves / external feeding
Leaves / external feeding
Whole plant / external feeding
Whole plant / external feeding

Natural enemies

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Natural enemyTypeLife stagesSpecificityReferencesBiological control inBiological control on
Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki Pathogen Larvae
Bacillus thuringiensis thuringiensis Pathogen Larvae
Cotesia melanoscela Parasite Larvae
Entomophaga aulicae Pathogen Larvae
Glyptapanteles porthetriae Parasite Larvae
Haematonectria haematococca Pathogen
Hyposoter exiguae Parasite Larvae
Hyposoter fugitivus Parasite Larvae
Hyposoter rivalis Parasite Larvae
Nucleopolyhedrosis virus Pathogen Larvae
Ooencyrtus kuvanae Parasite Eggs
Rogas lymantriae Parasite Larvae

Plant Trade

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Plant parts liable to carry the pest in trade/transportPest stagesBorne internallyBorne externallyVisibility of pest or symptoms
Bark eggs Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Stems (above ground)/Shoots/Trunks/Branches eggs Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Plant parts not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Bulbs/Tubers/Corms/Rhizomes
Flowers/Inflorescences/Cones/Calyx
Fruits (inc. pods)
Growing medium accompanying plants
Leaves
Roots
Seedlings/Micropropagated plants
True seeds (inc. grain)
Wood

Wood Packaging

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Wood Packaging liable to carry the pest in trade/transportTimber typeUsed as packing
Loose wood packing material Crates Yes
Solid wood packing material with bark Crates Yes
Solid wood packing material without bark Crates Yes
Wood Packaging not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Non-wood
Processed or treated wood

References

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Bryk F, 1934. Das Tierreich. 64(19):61-62.

Dixon WN; Foltz JL, 1991. Caterpillars that are not the gypsy moth caterpillar. Some forest Lepidoptera in Florida (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae, Lasiocampidae, Lymantriidae). Entomology Circular (Gainesville), No. 344:1 p.

Eidt DC; MacGillivray HG, 1972. Resistance of seven fir species to spruce budworm and other insects. Bi-monthly Research Notes, 28(1):2-3

Elgee E, 1975. Persistence of a virus of the white-marked tussock moth on Balsam Fir foliage. Bi-monthly Research Notes, 31(5):33-34

Ferguson DC, 1978. Noctuoidea, Lymantriidae. In: Dominick RB et al., eds. The moths of America north of Mexico (including Greenland), Vol. 22.2. London, UK: E.W. Classey.

Foott WH; Timmins PR, 1977. Observations on new insect pests of grain corn in Essex County, Ontario. Proceedings of the Entomological Society of Ontario, 108:49-52

Grant GG, 1978. Field trials on disruption of pheromone communication of tussock moths. Journal of Economic Entomology, 71(3):453-457

Grant GG; McCarty L, 1977. Effect of age on calling behavior and mating success of whitemarked tussock moths. Bi-monthly Research Notes, 33(1):2-3

Guzo D; Stoltz DB, 1985. Obligatory multiparasitism in the tussock moth, Orgyia leucostigma. Parasitology, 90(1):1-10

Hajek AE; Strazanac JS; Wheeler MM; Vermeylen FM; Butler L, 2004. Persistence of the fungal pathogen Entomophaga maimaiga and its impact on native Lymantriidae. Biological Control, 30(2):466-473.

Medina RF; Barbosa P, 2002. Predation of small and large Orgyia leucostigma (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) larvae by vertebrate and invertebrate predators. Environmental Entomology, 31(6):1097-1102; 47 ref.

Richard J; Heitzman JE, 1987. Butterflies and Moths of Missouri. Missouri, USA: Missouri Department of Conservation.

Thompson LC; Solomon JD, 1986. The insect defoliator fauna of young sycamore plantations in the Mississippi Delta and its seasonal population development in 1981. Bulletin, Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station, Arkansas University, No. 897:24pp.

Thurston GS, 2002. Orgyia leucostigma (J. E. Smith), Whitemarked tussock Moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae). In: Mason PG, Huber JT, eds. Biological control programmes in Canada, 1981-2000. Wallingford, UK: CAB International, 201-203.

Tietz HM, 1972. An Index to the described Life Histories, Early Stages and Hosts of the Macrolepidoptera of the Continental United States and Canada. Sarasota, Florida, USA: A.C. Allyn.

West RJ; Cunningham JC; Kaupp WJ, 1987. Ground spray applications of Virtuss, a nuclear polyhedrosis virus, against white-marked tussock moth larvae at Bottom Brook, Newfoundland in 1986. Information Report - Newfoundland Forestry Centre, Canadian Forestry Service, No. N-X-257:10 pp.

Wilson LF, 1991. Location and condition of whitemarked tussock moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) cocoons in a Michigan black walnut plantation. Great Lakes Entomologist, 24(3):153-157

Distribution References

Dixon W N, Foltz J L, 1991. Caterpillars that are not the gypsy moth caterpillar. Some forest Lepidoptera in Florida (Lepidoptera: Arctiidae, Lasiocampidae, Lymantriidae). Entomology Circular (Gainesville). 1 p.

Eidt D C, MacGillivray H G, 1972. Resistance of seven fir species to spruce budworm and other insects. Bi-monthly Research Notes. 28 (1), 2-3.

Elgee E, 1975. Persistence of a virus of the white-marked tussock moth on Balsam Fir foliage. Bi-monthly Research Notes. 31 (5), 33-34.

Ferguson DC, 1978. Noctuoidea, Lymantriidae. In: The moths of America north of Mexico (including Greenland), 22.2 [ed. by Dominick RB et al]. London, UK: E.W. Classey.

Hajek A E, Strazanac J S, Wheeler M M, Vermeylen F M, Butler L, 2004. Persistence of the fungal pathogen Entomophaga maimaiga and its impact on native Lymantriidae. Biological Control. 30 (2), 466-473. DOI:10.1016/j.biocontrol.2004.02.005

Medina R F, Barbosa P, 2002. Predation of small and large Orgyia leucostigma (J. E. Smith) (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) larvae by vertebrate and invertebrate predators. Environmental Entomology. 31 (6), 1097-1102. DOI:10.1603/0046-225X-31.6.1097

Richard J, Heitzman JE, 1987. Butterflies and Moths of Missouri., Missouri, USA: Missouri Department of Conservation.

Thompson L C, Solomon J D, 1986. The insect defoliator fauna of young sycamore plantations in the Mississippi Delta and its seasonal population development in 1981. In: Bulletin, Arkansas Agricultural Experiment Station, Arkansas University, 24pp.

West R J, Cunningham J C, Kaupp W J, 1987. Ground spray applications of Virtuss®, a nuclear polyhedrosis virus, against white-marked tussock moth larvae at Bottom Brook, Newfoundland in 1986. In: Information Report - Newfoundland Forestry Centre, Canadian Forestry Service, 10 pp.

Wilson L F, 1991. Location and condition of whitemarked tussock moth (Lepidoptera: Lymantriidae) cocoons in a Michigan black walnut plantation. Great Lakes Entomologist. 24 (3), 153-157.

Distribution Maps

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