Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Ochropsora ariae

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Datasheet

Ochropsora ariae

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 21 November 2019
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Documented Species
  • Pest
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Ochropsora ariae
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Fungi
  •     Phylum: Basidiomycota
  •       Subphylum: Pucciniomycotina
  •         Class: Pucciniomycetes
  • Summary of Invasiveness
  • There is little published information on this plant pathogenic fungus, which has limited geographic distribution. As hosts exist in other regions of the world with similar environmental conditions, this species may pose...

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Aecia of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x2.5.
TitleAecia
CaptionAecia of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x2.5.
CopyrightUSDA-ARS/Systematic Mycology & Microbiology Laboratory
Aecia of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x2.5.
AeciaAecia of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x2.5. USDA-ARS/Systematic Mycology & Microbiology Laboratory
Aeciospores of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x400. Note scale bar.
TitleAeciospores
CaptionAeciospores of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x400. Note scale bar.
CopyrightUSDA-ARS/Systematic Mycology & Microbiology Laboratory
Aeciospores of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x400. Note scale bar.
AeciosporesAeciospores of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x400. Note scale bar. USDA-ARS/Systematic Mycology & Microbiology Laboratory
Peridial cells of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x400. Note scale bar.
TitlePeridial cells
CaptionPeridial cells of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x400. Note scale bar.
CopyrightUSDA-ARS/Systematic Mycology & Microbiology Laboratory
Peridial cells of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x400. Note scale bar.
Peridial cellsPeridial cells of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x400. Note scale bar. USDA-ARS/Systematic Mycology & Microbiology Laboratory
Peridial cells on surface of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x400. Note scale bar.
TitlePeridial cells
CaptionPeridial cells on surface of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x400. Note scale bar.
CopyrightUSDA-ARS/Systematic Mycology & Microbiology Laboratory
Peridial cells on surface of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x400. Note scale bar.
Peridial cellsPeridial cells on surface of Ochropsora ariae on Anemone nemorosa. Original x400. Note scale bar.USDA-ARS/Systematic Mycology & Microbiology Laboratory

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Ochropsora ariae (Fuckel) Ramsb. 1923

Other Scientific Names

  • Aecidium anemones Pers. 1801
  • Aecidium leucospermum DC. 1805
  • Caeoma sorbi Oudem. 1873
  • Melampsora ariae Fuckel 1870
  • Melampsora pallida Rostr. 1877
  • Ochropsora pallida (Rostr.) Lind 1913

Summary of Invasiveness

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There is little published information on this plant pathogenic fungus, which has limited geographic distribution. As hosts exist in other regions of the world with similar environmental conditions, this species may pose a threat to native or agricultural plants if introduced.

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Fungi
  •         Phylum: Basidiomycota
  •             Subphylum: Pucciniomycotina
  •                 Class: Pucciniomycetes
  •                     Order: Pucciniales
  •                         Family: Uropyxidaceae
  •                             Genus: Ochropsora
  •                                 Species: Ochropsora ariae

Notes on Taxonomy and Nomenclature

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Hiratsuka et al. (1992) list several other names as synonyms including Ochropsorasorbi (Winter) Dietel 1895. There seems to be some controversy about this, so the author of this datasheet prefers to take a more conservative approach and omit the taxonomic synonyms at this time (2009).

Description

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Spermogonia amphigenous, more or less evenly scattered, subcuticular, conical, 110-140 µm wide, 60-100 µm high. Aecia hypophyllous or on abaxial leaf surface, aecidioid, surrounded by well-developed peridium, cupulate; peridial cells cubical, outer walls smooth, inner walls verrucose; aeciospores produced in chains, subglobose or broadly ellipsoid, often angular, 14-27 x 13-21 µm; walls thin, hyaline, densely warted. Uredinia hypophyllous or on abaxial leaf surface, minute, round, 0.15-0.25 mm diameter; paraphyses incurved, variable in size, 29-77 x 8-19 µm; urediniospores broadly ellipsoid or obovoid, 21-28 x 17-23 µm; walls 1.5-2.0 µm thick, hyaline, verrucose to echinulate. Telia hypophyllous, scattered or irregularly aggregated on yellowish to reddish spots, subepidermal, becoming erumpent; teliospores broadly cylindric, round at apex, 35-65 x 9-18 µm, 4-celled basidia continuously replacing teliospores; basidiospores obovoid to ellipsoid or narrowly ellipsoid, 20-25 x 7-10 µm; probasidia developing under host epidermis, sessile, walls thin and fragile, oblong to cylindrical, variable, 27-47 x 9-18 µm. See Hiratsuka et al. (1992) and Ono (2006) for more detailed descriptions.

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Last updated: 10 Jan 2020
Continent/Country/Region Distribution Last Reported Origin First Reported Invasive Reference Notes

Asia

ChinaPresentCABI (Undated a)Present based on regional distribution.
-FujianPresentZhuang (1983)
-QinghaiPresent, Few occurrencesCABI (Undated)Original citation: Zhuang et al. (2005)
IsraelPresentSavchenko et al. (2014)
JapanPresent, Few occurrencesOno (2006)
-HokkaidoPresentCABI (Undated b)
-HonshuPresentCABI (Undated b)
NepalPresentBALFOUR-BROWNE (1955)
TaiwanPresentHiratsuka and Chen (1991)
TurkeyPresentBahcecıoglu and Gjaerum (2004)

Europe

BulgariaPresentDenchev (1995)
DenmarkPresent, Few occurrencesHylander et al. (1953)
FinlandPresent, Few occurrencesHylander et al. (1953)
GermanyPresent, Few occurrencesHylander et al. (1953)
GreecePresentPantidou (1973)
NorwayPresent, Few occurrencesHylander et al. (1953)
PolandPresentCABI (Undated b)
SwedenPresentHylander et al. (1953)
United KingdomPresentHenderson (2000)

North America

United StatesPresentCABI (Undated a)Present based on regional distribution.
-MassachusettsPresentBPI (US National Fungus Collections) (2009)

Habitat List

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CategorySub-CategoryHabitatPresenceStatus
Terrestrial
Terrestrial – ManagedCultivated / agricultural land Present, no further details
Managed forests, plantations and orchards Present, no further details
Terrestrial ‑ Natural / Semi-naturalNatural forests Present, no further details

Hosts/Species Affected

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Based on artificial inoculation experiments, Ono (2006) confirmed that, in Japan, the spermogonial and aecial host of O. ariae is Anemone pseudo-altaica and the uredinial and telial stages are produced on Aruncus dioicus var. tenuifolius.

Host Plants and Other Plants Affected

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Plant nameFamilyContext
Amelanchier asiaticaRosaceaeWild host
Amelanchier canadensis (thicket serviceberry)RosaceaeWild host
Anemone (windflower)RanunculaceaeWild host
Anemone altaicaRanunculaceaeWild host
Anemone blandaWild host
Anemone flaccidaRanunculaceaeWild host
Anemone glabrataRanunculaceaeWild host
Anemone hortensisRanunculaceaeWild host
Anemone nemorosaRanunculaceaeMain
Anemone pavoninaWild host
Anemone pseudo-altaicaRanunculaceaeWild host
Anemone ranunculoidesRanunculaceaeWild host
Anemone rivularisRanunculaceaeWild host
Aruncus dioicusPsittacidaeWild host
Aruncus dioicus var. tenuifoliusZygaenidaeWild host
Aruncus vulgaris var. americanusCarabidaeWild host
Malus sylvestris (crab-apple tree)RosaceaeMain
Prunus mume (Japanese apricot tree)RosaceaeWild host
Pyrus communis (European pear)RosaceaeWild host
Pyrus pyrifolia (Oriental pear tree)RosaceaeWild host
Pyrus spp.RosaceaeWild host
Pyrus ussuriensis (amur pear)RosaceaeWild host
Pyrus xerophilaRosaceaeWild host
Sorbus acupariaRosaceaeMain
Sorbus aria (whitebeam)RosaceaeWild host
Sorbus hybridaRosaceaeWild host
Sorbus torminalis (rowan)RosaceaeOther

List of Symptoms/Signs

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SignLife StagesType
Leaves / abnormal colours
Leaves / abnormal leaf fall
Leaves / abnormal patterns
Leaves / wilting

Plant Trade

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Plant parts liable to carry the pest in trade/transportPest stagesBorne internallyBorne externallyVisibility of pest or symptoms
Leaves fruiting bodies Pest or symptoms not visible to the naked eye but usually visible under light microscope

Impact Summary

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CategoryImpact
Cultural/amenity Negative
Economic/livelihood Negative
Environment (generally) Negative
Human health Negative

Risk and Impact Factors

Top of page Impact outcomes
  • Host damage
Impact mechanisms
  • Parasitism (incl. parasitoid)
  • Pathogenic

References

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Adamska I, 2001. Microscopic fungus-like organisms and fungi of the Slowinski National Park II (NW Poland). Acta Mycologica, 36:31-65.

Bahcecioglu Z; Gjaerum HB, 2004. New and rare rust fungi (Uredinales) from Anatolia (Turkey) - 2. Mycotaxon, 90(1):55-68.

Balfour-Browne Frances L, 1955. Some Himalayan fungi. Bull. Brit. Mus. (nat. Hist.), Bot, 1(7):187-218 pp.

BPI (US National Fungus Collections), 2009. Fungal Databases - Specimens. Beltsville, USA: Systematic Mycology and Microbiology Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, USDA. www.nt.ars-grin.gov/fungaldatabases/specimens/specimens.cfm

Denchev CM, 1995. Bulgarian Uredinales. Mycotaxon, 55:405-465

Henderson DM, 2000. Checklist of the Rust Fungi of the British Isles. UK: British Mycological Society, 36 pp.

Henderson DM; Bennell AP, 1979. British rust fungi: additions and corrections. Notes from the Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh, 37(3):475-501.

Hiratsuka N; Chen ZC, 1991. A list of Uredinales collected from Taiwan. Transactions of the Mycological Society of Japan, 32:3-22.

Hiratsuka N; Sato S; Katsuya K; Kakishima M; Hiratsuka Y; Kaneko S; Ono Y; Sato T; Harada Y; Hiratsuka T; Nakayama K, 1992. The Rust Flora of Japan. Takezono, Ibaraki, Japan: Tsukuba Shuppankai, 1205 pp.

Hylander N; Jorstad I; Nannfeldt JA, 1953. [English title not available]. (Enumerato Uredinearum Scandinavicarum.) Opera Botanica a Societate Botanica Lundensi, 1:1-102.

Kuprevich V; Transchel V, 1957. Cryptogamic plants of the USSR, Vol. IV, Rust Fungi. No. 1, Family Melampsoraceae. Moscow, USSR: USSR Academy of Sciences.

Ono Y, 2006. Taxonomic implications of life cycle and basidium morphology of Ochropsora ariae and O. nambuana (Uredinales). Mycoscience, 47(3):145-151. http://www.springerlink.com/content/q31664t77jp83173/?p=e00b1560ac6843909e2164c25b1a4217&pi=5

Pantidou ME, 1973. Fungus-host index for Greece. Kiphissia, Greece: Benaki Phytopathological Institute, 382 pp.

Savchenko KG; Heluta VP; Wasser SP; Nevo E, 2014. Rust fungi (Pucciniales) of Israel. I. All genera except Puccinia and Uromyces with Caeoma origani sp. nov. Nova Hedwigia, 98(1/2):163-178. http://www.schweizerbart.de/resources/downloads/paper_previews/81651.pdf

Zhuang JY, 1983. A provisional list of Uredinales of Fujian Province, China. Acta Mycologica Sinica, 2(3):146-158

Zhuang WY, 2005. Fungi of Northwestern China. Ithaca, USA: Mycotaxon Ltd, 430 pp.

Distribution References

Bahcecıoglu Z, Gjaerum H B, 2004. New and rare rust fungi (Uredinales) from Anatolia (Turkey) - 2. Mycotaxon. 90 (1), 55-68.

BALFOUR-BROWNE FRANCES L, 1955. Some Himalayan fungi. Bull. Brit. Mus. (nat. Hist.), Bot. 1 (7), 187-218 pp.

BPI (US National Fungus Collections), 2009. Fungal Databases - Specimens., Beltsville, USA: Systematic Mycology and Microbiology Laboratory, Agricultural Research Service, USDA. http://www.nt.ars-grin.gov/fungaldatabases/specimens/specimens.cfm

CABI, Undated. Compendium record. Wallingford, UK: CABI

CABI, Undated a. CABI Compendium: Status inferred from regional distribution. Wallingford, UK: CABI

CABI, Undated b. CABI Compendium: Status as determined by CABI editor. Wallingford, UK: CABI

Denchev C M, 1995. Bulgarian Uredinales. Mycotaxon. 405-465.

Henderson D M, 2000. Checklist of the Rust Fungi of the British Isles. UK: British Mycological Society. 36 pp.

Hiratsuka N, Chen Z C, 1991. A list of Uredinales collected from Taiwan. Transactions of the Mycological Society of Japan. 3-22.

Hylander N, Jorstad I, Nannfeldt J A, 1953. Opera Botanica a Societate Botanica Lundensi, 1-102.

Ono Y, 2006. Taxonomic implications of life cycle and basidium morphology of Ochropsora ariae and O. nambuana (Uredinales). Mycoscience. 47 (3), 145-151. http://www.springerlink.com/content/q31664t77jp83173/?p=e00b1560ac6843909e2164c25b1a4217&pi=5 DOI:10.1007/s10267-006-0285-9

Pantidou M E, 1973. Fungus-host index for Greece. In: Fungus-host index for Greece. Kiphissia, Athens, Benaki Phytopathological Institute. Greece: 382 pp.

Savchenko K G, Heluta V P, Wasser S P, Nevo E, 2014. Rust fungi (Pucciniales) of Israel. I. All genera except Puccinia and Uromyces with Caeoma origani sp. nov. Nova Hedwigia. 98 (1/2), 163-178. http://www.schweizerbart.de/resources/downloads/paper_previews/81651.pdf DOI:10.1127/0029-5035/2013/0122

Zhuang J Y, 1983. A provisional list of Uredinales of Fujian Province, China. Acta Mycologica Sinica. 2 (3), 146-158.

Contributors

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10/09/09 Original text by:

Systematic Mycology & Microbiology Laboratory, USDA-ARS, 10300 Baltimore Ave., Beltsville, MD 20705, USA

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