Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Monochamus scutellatus
(white-spotted sawyer)

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Datasheet

Monochamus scutellatus (white-spotted sawyer)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 10 December 2020
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Pest
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Monochamus scutellatus
  • Preferred Common Name
  • white-spotted sawyer
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Metazoa
  •     Phylum: Arthropoda
  •       Subphylum: Uniramia
  •         Class: Insecta

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Monochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); adult male.
TitleAdult
CaptionMonochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); adult male.
Copyright©Dorothy Ambeault/Natural Resources Canada, Great Lakes Forestry Centre
Monochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); adult male.
AdultMonochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); adult male.©Dorothy Ambeault/Natural Resources Canada, Great Lakes Forestry Centre
Monochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); adult female.
TitleAdult
CaptionMonochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); adult female.
Copyright©Dorothy Ambeault/Natural Resources Canada, Great Lakes Forestry Centre
Monochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); adult female.
AdultMonochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); adult female.©Dorothy Ambeault/Natural Resources Canada, Great Lakes Forestry Centre
Monochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); adult female.
TitleAdult
CaptionMonochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); adult female.
Copyright©Jeremy D. Allison
Monochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); adult female.
AdultMonochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); adult female.©Jeremy D. Allison
Monochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); late-instar larval boring damage.
TitleLarval damage
CaptionMonochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); late-instar larval boring damage.
Copyright©Jeremy D. Allison
Monochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); late-instar larval boring damage.
Larval damageMonochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); late-instar larval boring damage.©Jeremy D. Allison
Monochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); early-instar larva.
TitleLarva
CaptionMonochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); early-instar larva.
Copyright©Jeremy D. Allison
Monochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); early-instar larva.
LarvaMonochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); early-instar larva.©Jeremy D. Allison
Monochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); oviposition niche with egg.
TitleEgg
CaptionMonochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); oviposition niche with egg.
Copyright©Jeremy D. Allison
Monochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); oviposition niche with egg.
EggMonochamus scutellatus (whitespotted sawyer); oviposition niche with egg.©Jeremy D. Allison

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Monochamus scutellatus (Say, 1824)

Preferred Common Name

  • white-spotted sawyer

Other Scientific Names

  • Cerambyx scutellatus
  • Monochamus monticola
  • Monochamus oregonensis
  • Monochamus resutor
  • Monochamus scutellatus oregonensis LeConte
  • Monochamus scutellatus scutellatus (Say)
  • Monohammus oregonensis
  • Monohammus scutellatus
  • Monohammus scutellatus oregonensis

International Common Names

  • English: Oregon fir sawyer; sawyer, white spotted; spruce sawyer
  • French: longicorne noir

EPPO code

  • MONCST (Monochamus scutellatus)

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Metazoa
  •         Phylum: Arthropoda
  •             Subphylum: Uniramia
  •                 Class: Insecta
  •                     Order: Coleoptera
  •                         Family: Cerambycidae
  •                             Genus: Monochamus
  •                                 Species: Monochamus scutellatus

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Last updated: 30 Jun 2021
Continent/Country/Region Distribution Last Reported Origin First Reported Invasive Reference Notes

Europe

BelgiumAbsent
LithuaniaAbsent, Confirmed absent by survey
NetherlandsAbsent, Confirmed absent by survey
SloveniaAbsent, Confirmed absent by survey

North America

CanadaPresent, Widespread
-AlbertaPresentNative
-British ColumbiaPresentNative
-ManitobaPresentNative
-New BrunswickPresentNative
-Newfoundland and LabradorPresentNative
-Northwest TerritoriesPresentNative
-Nova ScotiaPresentNative
-OntarioPresentNative
-Prince Edward IslandPresentNative
-QuebecPresentNative
-SaskatchewanPresentNative
-YukonPresentNative
MexicoPresent
United StatesPresent, Widespread
-AlabamaPresentNative
-AlaskaPresentNative
-ArizonaPresentNative
-ArkansasPresent
-CaliforniaPresentNative
-ColoradoPresent
-ConnecticutPresentNative
-DelawarePresentNative
-District of ColumbiaPresent
-FloridaPresent
-GeorgiaPresent
-IdahoPresent
-IllinoisPresent
-IndianaPresent
-KentuckyPresent
-LouisianaPresent
-MainePresentNative
-MarylandPresentNative
-MassachusettsPresentNative
-MichiganPresent
-MinnesotaPresent
-MississippiPresent
-MontanaPresent
-NebraskaPresent
-NevadaPresentNative
-New HampshirePresent
-New JerseyPresent
-New MexicoPresentNative
-New YorkPresentNative
-North CarolinaPresentNative
-North DakotaPresent
-OhioPresent
-OregonPresentNative
-PennsylvaniaPresent
-Rhode IslandPresent
-South CarolinaPresent
-TennesseePresent
-UtahPresent
-VermontPresentNative
-VirginiaPresentNative
-WashingtonPresentNative
-West VirginiaPresentNative
-WisconsinPresentNative
-WyomingPresent

Growth Stages

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Post-harvest

List of Symptoms/Signs

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SignLife StagesType
Whole plant / plant dead; dieback
Whole plant / uprooted or toppled

Natural enemies

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Natural enemyTypeLife stagesSpecificityReferencesBiological control inBiological control on
Beauveria bassiana Pathogen Arthropods|Larvae
Eutheresia monohammi Parasite Arthropods|Larvae
Eutheresia trivittata Parasite Arthropods|Larvae
Rhyssa lineolata Parasite Arthropods|Larvae
Rhyssa persuasoria Parasite Arthropods|Larvae

Pathway Vectors

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VectorNotesLong DistanceLocalReferences
Containers and packaging - wood Yes

Plant Trade

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Plant parts liable to carry the pest in trade/transportPest stagesBorne internallyBorne externallyVisibility of pest or symptoms
Bark arthropods/eggs; arthropods/larvae Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Stems (above ground)/Shoots/Trunks/Branches arthropods/adults; arthropods/eggs; arthropods/larvae; arthropods/pupae Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Wood arthropods/adults; arthropods/larvae; arthropods/pupae Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Plant parts not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Bulbs/Tubers/Corms/Rhizomes
Flowers/Inflorescences/Cones/Calyx
Fruits (inc. pods)
Growing medium accompanying plants
Leaves
Roots
Seedlings/Micropropagated plants
True seeds (inc. grain)

Wood Packaging

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Wood Packaging liable to carry the pest in trade/transportTimber typeUsed as packing
Solid wood packing material with bark Material recently killed and exposed to attack. Conifer hosts. No
Solid wood packing material without bark Material recently killed and exposed to attack with bark. Conifer hosts. No
Wood Packaging not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Loose wood packing material
Non-wood
Processed or treated wood

References

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Allison JD, Borden JH, 2001. Observations on the behavior of Monochamus scutellatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in northern British Columbia. Journal of the Entomological Society of British Columbia, 98:195-200; 18 ref.

Allison JD, Borden JH, McIntosh RL, Groot Pde, Gries R, 2001. Kairomonal response by four Monochamus species (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) to bark beetle pheromones. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 27(4):633-646; 42 ref.

Allison JD, Morewood WD, Borden JH, Hein KE, Wilson IM, 2003. Differential bio-activity of Ips and Dendroctonus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) pheromone components for Monochamus clamator and M. scutellatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Environmental Entomology, 32(1):23-30; 39 ref.

Atwood CE, 1945. Wood borers. Canadian Department of Agriculture, Bi-monthly Progress Report 1:2.

Bergdahl DR, Smeltzer DLK, Halik SS, 1985. Components of a conifer wilt disease complex in the northeastern United States. In: Dropkin VH, ed. Proceedings of the United States-Japan Seminar: The resistance mechanisms of pines against pine wilt disease. USA: University of Missouri 152-155.

CABI/EPPO, 1998. Distribution maps of quarantine pests for Europe (edited by Smith IM, Charles LMF). Wallingford, UK: CAB International, xviii + 768 pp.

Cerezke HF, 1975. White-spotted sawyer beetle in logs. Environment Canada, Canadian Forestry Service, Information Report NOR-X-129.

de Groot P, Nott RW, 2001. Evaluation of trap designs to capture pine sawyer beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Agricultural and Forest Entomology, 3:107-111.

EPPO, 2014. PQR database. Paris, France: European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization. http://www.eppo.int/DATABASES/pqr/pqr.htm

Hughes AL, 1979. Reproductive behaviour and sexual dimorphism in the white-spotted sawyer Monochamus scutellatus (Say). Coleopterists Bulletin, 33(1):45-47

Hughes AL, 1981. Differential male mating success in the white spotted sawyer Monochamus scutellatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Annals of the Entomological Society of America, 74(2):180-184

Hughes AL, Hughes MK, 1982. Male size, mating success, and breeding habitat partitioning in the whitespotted sawyer, Monochamus scutellatus (Say) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Oecologia, 55:258-263.

Hughes AL, Hughes MK, 1985. Female choice of mates in a polygynous insect, the whitespotted sawyer Monochamus scutellatus. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, 17:385-387

Hughes AL, Hughes MK, 1987. Asymmetric contests among sawyer beetles (Cerambycidae: Monochamus notatus and Monochamus scutellatus). Canadian Journal of Zoology, 65(4):823-827

Linit MJ, 1988. Nematode-vector relationships in the pine wilt disease system. Journal of Nematology, 20(2):227-235

Linsley EG, Chemsak JA, 1984. The Cerambycidae of North America, Part VII, No. 1: Taxonomy and classification of the subfamily Lamiinae, tribes Parmenini through Acanthoderini. University of California Press, Berkeley, USA: University of California Publications in Entomology, Vol. 102.

McIntosh RL, Katinic PJ, Allison JD, Borden JH, Downey DL, 2001. Comparative efficacy of five types of trap for woodborers in the Cerambycidae, Buprestidae and Siricidae. Agricultural and Forest Entomology, 3(2):113-120; 36 ref.

Morewood WD, Hein KE, Katinic PJ, Borden JH, 2002. An improved trap for large wood-boring insects, with special reference to Monochamus scutellatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 32(3):519-525; 32 ref.

Morewood WD, Simmonds KE, Gries R, Allison JD, Borden JH, 2003. Disruption by conophthorin of the kairomonal response of sawyer beetles to bark beetle pheromones. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 29(9): 2115-2129.

Ostaff D, Shields JK, 1978. Reduction of losses to logs and lumber caused by wood-boring insects. Fisheries and Environment Canada, Eastern Forest Products Laboratory, Report OPX218E, 15 pp.

Parmelee FT, 1941. Longhorned and flatheaded borers attacking fire-killed coniferous timber in Michigan. Journal of Economic Entomology, 34:377-380.

Payette M, Work TT, Drouin P, Koubaa A, 2015. Efficacy of microwave irradiation for phytosanitation of wood packing materials. Industrial Crops and Products, 69:187-196. http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0926669015000321

Peddle S, Groot Pde, Smith S, 2002. Oviposition behaviour and response of Monochamus scutellatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) to conspecific eggs and larvae. Agricultural and Forest Entomology, 4(3):217-222; 24 ref.

Phero Tech Inc., 1997. Damage assessment of woodborers in the interior of BC. Phero Tech Inc 7572 Progress Way, RR#5, Delta, BC. V4G 1E9, Canada. Unpublished Report.

Prebble ML, Gardiner LM, 1958. Degrade and value loss in fire-killed pine in the Mississauga area of Ontario. Forestry Chronicle, 34:139-158.

Raske AG, 1972. Biology and control of Monochamus and Tetropium, the economic woodborers of Alberta (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Edmonton, Alberta, Canada: Northern Forest Research Centre, Internal Report NOR-9.

Rose AH, 1957. Some notes on the biology of Monochamus scutellatus (Say) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). The Canadian Entomologist, 89:547-553.

Rose, A. H., 1957. Some Notes on the Biology of Monochamus scutellatus (Say) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). The Canadian Entomologist, 89(12), 547-553. doi: 10.4039/Ent89547-12

Ross DA, 1966. Biology of the spotted pine sawyer M. maculosus (Haldeman) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Environment Canada, Canadian Forestry Service. Internal Report BC-5.

Safranyik L, Raske AG, 1970. Sequential sampling plan for larvae of Monochamus in lodgepole pine logs. Journal of Economic Entomology, 63:1903-1906.

Solomon JD, 1969. Woodpecker predation on insect borers in living hardwoods. Annals of the Entomological Society of America, 62:1214-1215.

Wickman BE, 1965. Black-headed three-toed woodpecker, Picoides arcticus predation on Monochamus oregonensis (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Pan-Pacific Entomologist, 41:162-164.

Wilson LF, 1962. White-spotted sawyer. USDA Forest Service, Forest Insect and Disease Leaflet 74.

Wingfield MJ, 1987. Fungi associated with the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, and cerambycid beetles in Wisconsin. Mycologia, 79(2):325-328

Zhang JianJun, Zhang RunZhi, Chen JingYuan, 2007. Species and their dispersal ability of Monochamus as vectors to transmit Bursaphelenchus xylophilus. Journal of Zhejiang Forestry College, 24(3):350-356. http://zjlx.chinajournal.net.cn

Distribution References

Bergdahl DR, Smeltzer DLK, Halik SS, 1985. Components of a conifer wilt disease complex in the northeastern United States. [Proceedings of the United States-Japan Seminar: The resistance mechanisms of pines against pine wilt disease], [ed. by Dropkin VH]. USA: University of Missouri. 152-155.

CABI, Undated. CABI Compendium: Status as determined by CABI editor. Wallingford, UK: CABI

EPPO, 2021. EPPO Global database. In: EPPO Global database, Paris, France: EPPO. https://gd.eppo.int/

Hughes A L, Hughes M K, 1985. Female choice of mates in a polygynous insect, the whitespotted sawyer Monochamus scutellatus. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology. 385-387. DOI:10.1007/BF00293217

Linsley E G, Chemsak J A, 1984. The Cerambycidae of North America, Part VII, No. 1: taxonomy and classification of the subfamily Lamiinae, tribes Parmenini through Acanthoderini. In: University of California Publications in Entomology, 102 xi + 258 pp.

NPPO of the Netherlands, 2013. Pest status of harmful organisms in the Netherlands., Wageningen, Netherlands:

Peddle S, Groot P de, Smith S, 2002. Oviposition behaviour and response of Monochamus scutellatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) to conspecific eggs and larvae. Agricultural and Forest Entomology. 4 (3), 217-222. DOI:10.1046/j.1461-9563.2002.00145.x

Rose A H, 1957. Some Notes on the Biology of Monochamus scutellatus (Say) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). The Canadian Entomologist. 89 (12), 547-553. DOI:10.4039/Ent89547-12

Wingfield M J, 1987. Fungi associated with the pine wood nematode, Bursaphelenchus xylophilus, and cerambycid beetles in Wisconsin. Mycologia. 79 (2), 325-328. DOI:10.2307/3807667

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