Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Monochamus notatus
(northeastern sawyer)

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Datasheet

Monochamus notatus (northeastern sawyer)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 15 July 2018
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Pest
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Monochamus notatus
  • Preferred Common Name
  • northeastern sawyer
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Metazoa
  •     Phylum: Arthropoda
  •       Subphylum: Uniramia
  •         Class: Insecta
  • Summary of Invasiveness
  • Although there are no known records of M. notatus becoming established outside its natural range in North America, the species should be considered as a risk species wherever its host genera (e.g. Pinus, Picea and Abies) are found. This is because it...

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Adult male of M. notatus.
TitleAdult
CaptionAdult male of M. notatus.
CopyrightDorothy Ambeault/Natural Resources Canada, Great Lakes Forestry Centre
Adult male of M. notatus.
AdultAdult male of M. notatus.Dorothy Ambeault/Natural Resources Canada, Great Lakes Forestry Centre
Adult female of M. notatus.
TitleAdult
CaptionAdult female of M. notatus.
CopyrightDorothy Ambeault/Natural Resources Canada, Great Lakes Forestry Centre
Adult female of M. notatus.
AdultAdult female of M. notatus.Dorothy Ambeault/Natural Resources Canada, Great Lakes Forestry Centre

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Monochamus notatus (Drury, 1773)

Preferred Common Name

  • northeastern sawyer

Other Scientific Names

  • Cerambyx notatus Drury
  • Monochamus confusor Kirby
  • Monochamus dentator Westwood
  • Monochamus notatus Casey
  • Monochamus notatus morgani Hopping
  • Monohammus confusor LeConte
  • Monohammus notatus Fitch

International Common Names

  • French: longicorne gris

EPPO code

  • MONCNO (Monochamus notatus)

Summary of Invasiveness

Top of page Although there are no known records of M. notatus becoming established outside its natural range in North America, the species should be considered as a risk species wherever its host genera (e.g. Pinus, Picea and Abies) are found. This is because it can be easily transported outside its natural range in untreated wood.

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Metazoa
  •         Phylum: Arthropoda
  •             Subphylum: Uniramia
  •                 Class: Insecta
  •                     Order: Coleoptera
  •                         Family: Cerambycidae
  •                             Genus: Monochamus
  •                                 Species: Monochamus notatus

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Continent/Country/RegionDistributionLast ReportedOriginFirst ReportedInvasiveReferenceNotes

North America

CanadaPresentEPPO, 2014
-AlbertaPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984; EPPO, 2014
-British ColumbiaPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941; EPPO, 2014
-ManitobaPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984; EPPO, 2014
-New BrunswickPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984; EPPO, 2014
-Northwest TerritoriesPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984; EPPO, 2014
-Nova ScotiaPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941; EPPO, 2014
-OntarioPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941; EPPO, 2014
-Prince Edward IslandPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941; EPPO, 2014
-QuebecPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984; EPPO, 2014
-SaskatchewanPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984; EPPO, 2014
USAPresentEPPO, 2014
-ConnecticutPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-DelawarePresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984
-GeorgiaPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984
-IdahoPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984
-IllinoisPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-IndianaPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984
-MainePresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-MarylandPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-MassachusettsPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-MichiganPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-MinnesotaPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-MontanaPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984
-NebraskaPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984
-New HampshirePresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-New JerseyPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-New YorkPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941; EPPO, 2014
-North CarolinaPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-OhioPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-OklahomaPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984
-PennsylvaniaPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-Rhode IslandPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-South CarolinaPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-TennesseePresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984
-VermontPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984
-VirginiaPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941
-WashingtonPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984
-West VirginiaPresentNative Not invasive Linsley and Chemsak, 1984
-WisconsinPresentNative Not invasive Dillon and Dillon, 1941

Europe

NetherlandsAbsent, confirmed by surveyNPPO of the Netherlands, 2013; EPPO, 2014

Growth Stages

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List of Symptoms/Signs

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SignLife StagesType
Leaves / external feeding
Stems / internal feeding
Whole plant / frass visible
Whole plant / internal feeding
Whole plant / plant dead; dieback

Natural enemies

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Natural enemyTypeLife stagesSpecificityReferencesBiological control inBiological control on
Beauveria bassiana Pathogen Adults/Larvae/Pupae
Billaea trivittata Parasite Larvae
Paecilomyces farinosa Pathogen Larvae
Ptilodexia canescens Parasite Larvae
Rhyssa lineolata Parasite Larvae
Rhyssa persuasoria Parasite Larvae

Plant Trade

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Plant parts liable to carry the pest in trade/transportPest stagesBorne internallyBorne externallyVisibility of pest or symptoms
Stems (above ground)/Shoots/Trunks/Branches eggs; larvae; pupae Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Wood larvae; pupae Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Plant parts not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Bark
Bulbs/Tubers/Corms/Rhizomes
Flowers/Inflorescences/Cones/Calyx
Fruits (inc. pods)
Growing medium accompanying plants
Leaves
Roots
Seedlings/Micropropagated plants
True seeds (inc. grain)

Wood Packaging

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Wood Packaging liable to carry the pest in trade/transportTimber typeUsed as packing
Solid wood packing material with bark pallets; crates; dunnage; unprocessed green wood No
Wood Packaging not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Loose wood packing material
Non-wood
Processed or treated wood
Solid wood packing material without bark

References

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Allison JD; Borden JH; McIntosh RL; Groot Pde; Gries R, 2001. Kairomonal response by four Monochamus species (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) to bark beetle pheromones. Journal of Chemical Ecology, 27(4):633-646; 42 ref.

Allison JD; Morewood WD; Borden JH; Hein KE; Wilson IM, 2003. Differential bio-activity of Ips and Dendroctonus (Coleoptera: Scolytidae) pheromone components for Monochamus clamator and M. scutellatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Environmental Entomology, 32(1):23-30; 39 ref.

Baker WL, 1972. Eastern Forest Insects. USDA, Miscellaneous Publication 1175, 642 pp.

Cerezke HF, 1975. White-spotted sawyer beetle in logs. Environment Canada, Canadian Forestry Service, Information Report NOR-X-129.

Dillon LS; Dillon ES, 1941. The tribe Monochamini in the western hemisphere (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Reading Public Museum and Art Gallery Scientific Publications Number 1.

Dyer LJ; Seabrook WD, 1975. Sensilla on the antennal flagellum of the sawyer beetles Monochamus notatus (Drury) and Monochamus scutellatus (Say) (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Journal of Morphology, 146:513-532.

EPPO, 2014. PQR database. Paris, France: European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization. http://www.eppo.int/DATABASES/pqr/pqr.htm

Gardiner LM, 1957. Deterioration of fire-killed pine in Ontario and the causal wood-boring beetles. Canadian Entomologist, 89:241-263.

Groot P de; Nott R, 2003. Response of Monochamus (Col., Cerambycidae) and some Buprestidae to flight intercept traps. Journal of Applied Entomology: in press.

Groot Pde; Nott R, 2001. Evaluation of traps of six different designs to capture pine sawyer beetles (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Agricultural and Forest Entomology, 3(2):107-111; 25 ref.

Keen FP, 1952. Insect enemies of western forests. US Department of Agriculture, Miscellaneous Publication 273.

Linsley EG; Chemsak JA, 1984. The Cerambycidae of North America, Part VII, No. 1: Taxonomy and classification of the subfamily Lamiinae, tribes Parmenini through Acanthoderini. University of California Press, Berkeley, USA: University of California Publications in Entomology, Vol. 102.

McIntosh RL; Katinic PJ; Allison JD; Borden JH; Downey DL, 2001. Comparative efficacy of five types of trap for woodborers in the Cerambycidae, Buprestidae and Siricidae. Agricultural and Forest Entomology, 3(2):113-120; 36 ref.

Morewood WD; Hein KE; Katinic PJ; Borden JH, 2002. An improved trap for large wood-boring insects, with special reference to Monochamus scutellatus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae). Canadian Journal of Forest Research, 32(3):519-525; 32 ref.

Ostaff D; Shields JK, 1978. Reduction of losses to logs and lumber caused by wood-boring insects. Fisheries and Environment Canada, Eastern Forest Products Laboratory, Report OPX218E, 15 pp.

Parmelee FT, 1941. Longhorned and flatheaded borers attacking fire-killed coniferous timber in Michigan. Journal of Economic Entomology, 34:377-380.

Richmond HA; Lejeune RR, 1945. The deterioration of fire-killed white spruce by wood-boring insects in northern Saskatchewan. The Forestry Chronicle, 21:168-192.

Safranyik L; Raske AG, 1970. Sequential sampling plan for larvae of Monochamus in lodgepole pine logs. Journal of Economic Entomology, 63:1903-1906.

Soper RS; Olson; RE, 1963. Survey of biota associated with Monochamus (Coleoptera: Cerambycidae) in Maine. Canadian Entomologist 95:83-95.

Wilson LF, 1962. White-spotted sawyer. USDA Forest Service, Forest Insect and Disease Leaflet 74.

Distribution Maps

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