Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Leptosphaeria coniothyrium
(cane blight)

Toolbox

Datasheet

Leptosphaeria coniothyrium (cane blight)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 14 July 2018
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Pest
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Leptosphaeria coniothyrium
  • Preferred Common Name
  • cane blight
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Fungi
  •     Phylum: Ascomycota
  •       Subphylum: Pezizomycotina
  •         Class: Dothideomycetes

Don't need the entire report?

Generate a print friendly version containing only the sections you need.

Generate report

Pictures

Top of page
PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Overwintering raspberry canes scraped to expose vascular tissues, showing brown 'stripe' lesions associated with abrasion wounds.
TitleLesions
CaptionOverwintering raspberry canes scraped to expose vascular tissues, showing brown 'stripe' lesions associated with abrasion wounds.
CopyrightScottish Crop Research Institute
Overwintering raspberry canes scraped to expose vascular tissues, showing brown 'stripe' lesions associated with abrasion wounds.
LesionsOverwintering raspberry canes scraped to expose vascular tissues, showing brown 'stripe' lesions associated with abrasion wounds.Scottish Crop Research Institute
Overwintered raspberry canes in early spring showing silvering of epidermis and masses of grey-black pycnidiospores dried on the cane surface near machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer.
TitlePycnidiospores
CaptionOverwintered raspberry canes in early spring showing silvering of epidermis and masses of grey-black pycnidiospores dried on the cane surface near machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer.
CopyrightScottish Crop Research Institute
Overwintered raspberry canes in early spring showing silvering of epidermis and masses of grey-black pycnidiospores dried on the cane surface near machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer.
PycnidiosporesOverwintered raspberry canes in early spring showing silvering of epidermis and masses of grey-black pycnidiospores dried on the cane surface near machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer.Scottish Crop Research Institute
Overwintered raspberry canes in early spring showing silvering of epidermis and masses of grey-black pycnidiospores dried on the cane surface near machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer.  (Close-up view)
TitlePycnidiospores
CaptionOverwintered raspberry canes in early spring showing silvering of epidermis and masses of grey-black pycnidiospores dried on the cane surface near machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer. (Close-up view)
CopyrightScottish Crop Research Institute
Overwintered raspberry canes in early spring showing silvering of epidermis and masses of grey-black pycnidiospores dried on the cane surface near machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer.  (Close-up view)
PycnidiosporesOverwintered raspberry canes in early spring showing silvering of epidermis and masses of grey-black pycnidiospores dried on the cane surface near machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer. (Close-up view)Scottish Crop Research Institute
Transverse section of mature subepidermal pseudothecium showing asci and ascospores.
TitleAsci and ascospores
CaptionTransverse section of mature subepidermal pseudothecium showing asci and ascospores.
CopyrightScottish Crop Research Institute
Transverse section of mature subepidermal pseudothecium showing asci and ascospores.
Asci and ascosporesTransverse section of mature subepidermal pseudothecium showing asci and ascospores.Scottish Crop Research Institute
TitleAscospores
Caption
CopyrightScottish Crop Research Institute
AscosporesScottish Crop Research Institute
Overwintered fruiting canes of raspberry (cv. Malling Jewel) showing cane death and bud failure in spring caused by infection of machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer.  Note that new primocanes at the base of the plants are growing normally amongst old cane stubs left after pruning.
TitleSymptoms
CaptionOverwintered fruiting canes of raspberry (cv. Malling Jewel) showing cane death and bud failure in spring caused by infection of machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer. Note that new primocanes at the base of the plants are growing normally amongst old cane stubs left after pruning.
CopyrightScottish Crop Research Institute
Overwintered fruiting canes of raspberry (cv. Malling Jewel) showing cane death and bud failure in spring caused by infection of machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer.  Note that new primocanes at the base of the plants are growing normally amongst old cane stubs left after pruning.
SymptomsOverwintered fruiting canes of raspberry (cv. Malling Jewel) showing cane death and bud failure in spring caused by infection of machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer. Note that new primocanes at the base of the plants are growing normally amongst old cane stubs left after pruning.Scottish Crop Research Institute
Overwintered raspberry canes in early spring showing silvering of epidermis and masses of grey-black pycnidiospores dried on the cane surface near machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer.  (Extreme close-up view)
TitlePycnidiospores
CaptionOverwintered raspberry canes in early spring showing silvering of epidermis and masses of grey-black pycnidiospores dried on the cane surface near machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer. (Extreme close-up view)
CopyrightScottish Crop Research Institute
Overwintered raspberry canes in early spring showing silvering of epidermis and masses of grey-black pycnidiospores dried on the cane surface near machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer.  (Extreme close-up view)
PycnidiosporesOverwintered raspberry canes in early spring showing silvering of epidermis and masses of grey-black pycnidiospores dried on the cane surface near machine harvester wounds made in the previous summer. (Extreme close-up view)Scottish Crop Research Institute
Salmon pink, second generation raspberry cane midge larvae (Resseliella theobaldi) feeding on the surface of the polyderm beneath a natural split in the rind.  The brown areas on the polyderm represent the initial fungal invasion of the vascular tissues leading to the damage described as 'midge blight'.  (Close-up).
TitleRaspberry cane midge larvae
CaptionSalmon pink, second generation raspberry cane midge larvae (Resseliella theobaldi) feeding on the surface of the polyderm beneath a natural split in the rind. The brown areas on the polyderm represent the initial fungal invasion of the vascular tissues leading to the damage described as 'midge blight'. (Close-up).
CopyrightScottish Crop Research Institute
Salmon pink, second generation raspberry cane midge larvae (Resseliella theobaldi) feeding on the surface of the polyderm beneath a natural split in the rind.  The brown areas on the polyderm represent the initial fungal invasion of the vascular tissues leading to the damage described as 'midge blight'.  (Close-up).
Raspberry cane midge larvaeSalmon pink, second generation raspberry cane midge larvae (Resseliella theobaldi) feeding on the surface of the polyderm beneath a natural split in the rind. The brown areas on the polyderm represent the initial fungal invasion of the vascular tissues leading to the damage described as 'midge blight'. (Close-up).Scottish Crop Research Institute

Identity

Top of page

Preferred Scientific Name

  • Leptosphaeria coniothyrium (Fuckel) Sacc.

Preferred Common Name

  • cane blight

Other Scientific Names

  • Coniothyrium fuckelii Sacc.
  • Coniothyrium rosarum Cooke & Harkn.
  • Melanomma coniothyrium (Fuckel) L.Holm
  • Sphaeria coniothyrium Fuckel

International Common Names

  • English: blight: rose; cane blight: raspberry; canker: apple; needle blight: pine; stem canker: rose
  • Spanish: necrosis de las heridas
  • French: brulure des tiges du framboisier; dessechement des tiges du framboisier; pourriture noire du fraisier

Local Common Names

  • Germany: Brandfleckenkrankheit: Rose; Rindenfleckenkrankheit: Himbeere; Rindenfleckenkrankheit: Rose

EPPO code

  • LEPTCO (Leptosphaeria coniothyrium)

Taxonomic Tree

Top of page
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Fungi
  •         Phylum: Ascomycota
  •             Subphylum: Pezizomycotina
  •                 Class: Dothideomycetes
  •                     Subclass: Pleosporomycetidae
  •                         Order: Pleosporales
  •                             Family: Leptosphaeriaceae
  •                                 Genus: Leptosphaeria
  •                                     Species: Leptosphaeria coniothyrium

Distribution Table

Top of page

The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Continent/Country/RegionDistributionLast ReportedOriginFirst ReportedInvasiveReferenceNotes

Asia

BangladeshPresentRao et al., 1987
Brunei DarussalamPresentCMI, 1978
ChinaPresentCMI, 1978
-HenanPresentChen et al., 2017
-Hong KongPresentCMI, 1978
IndiaPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-Himachal PradeshPresentCMI, 1978
-Madhya PradeshPresentCMI, 1978
JapanPresentCMI, 1978
KuwaitPresentCMI, 1978
MalaysiaPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-SabahPresentCMI, 1978
NepalPresentCMI, 1978
PakistanPresentCMI, 1978
ThailandPresentIMI Herbarium, undated
TurkmenistanPresentCMI, 1978

Africa

KenyaPresentCMI, 1978
MalawiPresentCMI, 1978
MoroccoPresentCMI, 1978
NigeriaPresentCMI, 1978
South AfricaPresentCMI, 1978
UgandaPresentCMI, 1978
ZambiaPresentIMI Herbarium, undated
ZimbabwePresentCMI, 1978

North America

CanadaWidespreadShaw, 1973
-British ColumbiaWidespreadShaw, 1973
USAWidespreadConverse, 1966
-IdahoPresentShaw, 1973
-New YorkWidespreadStewart and Eustace, 1902

Central America and Caribbean

CubaPresentCMI, 1978

South America

ArgentinaPresentCMI, 1978
BrazilPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-Rio Grande do SulPresentCMI, 1978
ColombiaPresentCMI, 1978

Europe

AustriaPresentCMI, 1978
BulgariaPresentCMI, 1978
CyprusPresentIMI Herbarium, undated
Czechoslovakia (former)PresentCMI, 1978
DenmarkPresentCMI, 1978
EstoniaPresentCMI, 1978
FinlandPresentRuokola, 1982
FrancePresentCMI, 1978
GermanyWidespreadKohler, 1952; Seemuller, 1976; CMI, 1978; Seemuller et al., 1988
GreecePresentCMI, 1978
HungaryPresentCMI, 1978
IrelandPresentCMI, 1978
ItalyPresentCMI, 1978
LatviaPresentCMI, 1978
LithuaniaPresentCMI, 1978
NetherlandsWidespreadLabruyere and Engels, 1963; CMI, 1978
PolandWidespreadManka, 1992
PortugalPresentCMI, 1978
Russian FederationPresentCMI, 1978
SpainPresentCMI, 1978
SwitzerlandPresentStalder, 1965
UKWidespreadPitcher and Webb, 1952; CMI, 1978; Williamson and Hargreaves, 1978
Yugoslavia (former)PresentCMI, 1978

Oceania

AustraliaPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-New South WalesPresentCMI, 1978
-QueenslandPresentCMI, 1978
-South AustraliaPresentCMI, 1978
-TasmaniaPresentCMI, 1978
FijiPresentCMI, 1978
New ZealandPresentCMI, 1978
Papua New GuineaPresentIMI Herbarium, undated

Growth Stages

Top of page Flowering stage, Fruiting stage, Vegetative growing stage

List of Symptoms/Signs

Top of page
SignLife StagesType
Leaves / wilting
Leaves / yellowed or dead
Stems / dieback
Stems / discoloration of bark
Stems / internal discoloration
Stems / wilt

Plant Trade

Top of page
Plant parts liable to carry the pest in trade/transportPest stagesBorne internallyBorne externallyVisibility of pest or symptoms
Leaves hyphae; spores Yes Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Stems (above ground)/Shoots/Trunks/Branches hyphae; spores Yes Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Plant parts not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Bark
Bulbs/Tubers/Corms/Rhizomes
Fruits (inc. pods)
Growing medium accompanying plants
Roots
Seedlings/Micropropagated plants
True seeds (inc. grain)
Wood

References

Top of page

CMI, 1978. Leptosphaeria coniothyrium. Distribution Maps of Plant Diseases. Map. No. 185. Wallingford, UK: CAB International.

Converse RH, 1966. Diseases of raspberries and erect and trailing blackberries. Washington, USA: USDA, ARS, Agriculture Handbook no. 310, 26-28.

Dorenbosch MMJ, 1970. Key to nine ubiquitous soil-borne Phoma-like fungi. Persoonia, 6:1-14.

Eriksson O, Winka K, 1998. Families and higher taxa of ascomycota. Myconet, 1(2)17-24 [http://www.umu.se/myconet/fam.rft.html].

Gordon SC, Williamson B, 1984. Raspberry cane blight and midge blight. Leaflet, Ministry of Agriculture, Fisheries and Food, UK, No. 905:9 pp.

Gullino ML, Garibaldi A, 1996. Diseases of roses: evolution of problems and new approaches for their control. Acta Horticulturae, No. 424:195-201; 38 ref.

Gunfersheim N, Pritts M, 1989. Identifying an appropriate pruning system for 'Royalty' purple raspberry. Acta Horticulturae, 262:357-363.

Humphreys Jones DR, 1975. Cane blight (Leptosphaeria coniothyrium (Fuckel) Sacc.) of blackberries. Plant Pathology, 24(2):122-123

Humphreys-Jones DR, 1977. Leaf and shoot death (Coniothyrium fuckelii Sacc.) of Juniperus communis L. var. Compressa Carr. Plant Pathology, 26(1):47-48

Humphreys-Jones DR, 1980. Leaf and shoot death (Coniothyrium fuckelii) on Thuya orientalis cv. Aurea Nana. Plant Pathology, 29(4):199-200

IMI Herbarium, undated. Herbarium specimen. International Mycological Institute (now CABI Bioscience) Herbarium. Egham, UK: CABI Bioscience.

Jennings DL, 1979. Resistance to Leptosphaeria coniothyrium in the red raspberry and some related species. Annals of Applied Biology, 93(3):319-326

Jennings DL, Brydon E, 1989. Further studies on resistance to Leptosphaeria coniothyrium in the red raspberry and related species. Annals of Applied Biology, 115(3):499-506

Kohler H, 1952. Ein Beitrag zur Etiologie und Bekampfung des Himbeerrutensterbens. Nachrichtenblatt fur den Deutschen Pflanzenschutzdienst, 6:36-42.

Kowalski T, Krygier J, 1996. Mycological study on symptomless and diseased needles in pine stand attacked by Lophodermella sulcigena (Rostr.) v. H÷hn. Phytopathologia Polonica, No. 11:159-168; 18 ref.

LabruyFre RE, Engels GMMT, 1963. Overschimmels als oorzaal van de stengelziekten von de ramboos en hun Samenhang met het optreden van de frambozeschorsgalmug. Netherlands Journal of Plant Pathology, 69:235-257.

Luttrell ES, 1973. Loculoascomycetes. In: Ainsworth GC, Sparrow FK, Sussman AS, eds. The Fungi IVA. A Taxonomic Review with Keys: Ascomyctes and fungi Imperfecti. London, UK: Academic Press, 124-137.

Manka M, 1992. Fungi inhabiting needles of diseased yew trees (Taxus baccata L.) in Rokita yew reservation (Rezerwat "Cisy Rokickie"). Phytopathologia Polonica, No. 16:49-54; 12 ref.

Nijveldt W, 1963. [Biology, phenology and control of the raspberry cane midge (Thomasiniana theobaldi) because of its connection with the high incidence of raspberry cane disease in the Netherlands.] Netherlands Journal of Plant Pathology, 69:221-234.

Pitcher RS, 1951. The raspberry cane midge and its control. East Malling Research Station Report for 1950. East Malling, UK: GCRI.

Pitcher RS, Webb PCR, 1952. Observations on the raspberry cane midge (Thomasiniana theobaldi Barnes). II. 'Midge blight,' a fungal invasion of raspberry cane following injury by T. theobaldi. Journal of Horticultural Science, 27:95-100.

Punithalingam E, 1980. Leptosphaeria coniothyrium. Descriptions of pathogenic fungi and bacteria. no. 663. Kew, Surrey, UK: Commonwealth Mycological Institute.

Rahman MA, 1987. Bamboo blight in the village groves of Bangladesh. Recent research on bamboos. Proceedings of the International Bamboo Workshop, 6-14 Oct., 1985 Hangzhou, China [edited by Rao, A.N; Dhanarajan, G.; Sastry, C.B.] Canada; International Development Research Centre. China; Chinese Academy of Forestry, 266-270

Ramsay AM, Cormack MR, Mason DT, Williamson B, 1985. Problems of harvesting raspberries by machine in Scotland - A review of progress. Agricultural Engineer, 40:2-9.

Ruokola A-L, 1982. Fungus diseases of raspberry (Rubus idaeus L.) in Finland. Journal of the Scientific Agricultural Society of Finland, 54(2):99-111

Seemuller E, 1976. Experiments on the control of parasitic cane diseases of raspberries. Zeitschrift fur Pflanzenkrankheiten und Pflanzenschutz, 83(9):545-554

Seemuller E, Kartte S, Erdel M, 1988. Penetration of the periderm of red raspberry canes by Leptosphaeria coniothyrium. Journal of Phytopathology, 123(4):362-369

Shaw CG, 1973. Host fungus index for the Pacific Northwest. I. Hosts. Bulletin, Washington Agricultural Experimental Station, No. 765.

Stalder L, 1965. Untersuchungen uber einige kausale Zusammenhenge des Himbeerrutensterbens. Zeitschrift fur Pflanzenkrankheiten und Pflanzenschutz, 72:531-544.

Stewart FC, Eustace HJ, 1902. Raspberry cane blight and raspberry yellows. I. Raspberry cane blight. New York Agricultural Experimental Station Bulletin, 226:333-362.

Waister PD, Cormack MR, Sheets WA, 1977. Competition between fruiting and vegetative phases in the red raspberry. Journal of Horticultural Science, 52:75-85.

Williamson B, 1984. Polyderm, a barrier to infection of red raspberry buds by Didymella applanata and Botrytis cinerea. Annals of Botany, 53(1):83-89

Williamson B, 1984. Problems of diagnosis and control of raspberry cane blight and midge blight in Scotland. Crop protection in northern Britain 1984. Proceedings of a conference held at Dundee University 19-22 March 1984., 364-369; 14 ref.

Williamson B, 1987. Effect of fenitrothion and benomyl sprays on raspberry cane midge (Resseliella theobaldi) and midge blight, with particular reference to Leptosphaeria coniothyrium in the disease complex. Journal of Horticultural Science, 62:171-175.

Williamson B, Bristow PR, Seemuller E, 1986. Factors affecting the development of cane blight (Leptosphaeria coniothyrium) on red raspberries in Washington, Scotland and Germany. Annals of Applied Biology, 108(1):33-42

Williamson B, Hargreaves AJ, 1978. Cane blight (Leptosphaeria coniothyrium) in mechanically harvested red raspberry (Rubus idaeus). Annals of Applied Biology, 88(1):37-43

Williamson B, Hargreaves AJ, 1979. Fungi on red raspberry from lesions associated with feeding wounds of cane midge (Resseliella theobaldi). Annals of Applied Biology, 91(3):303-307

Williamson B, Hargreaves AJ, 1981. The effect of sprays of thiophanate-methyl on cane diseases and yield in red raspberry, with particular reference to cane blight (Leptosphaeria coniothyrium). Annals of Applied Biology, 97(2):165-174

Williamson B, Jennings DL, 1992. Resistance to cane and foliar diseases in red raspberry (Rubus idaeus) and related species. Euphytica, 63(1/2):59-70

Williamson B, Lawson HM, Woodford JAT, Hargreaves AJ, Wiseman JS, Gordon SC, 1979. Vigour control, an integrated approach to cane, pest and disease management in red raspberry (Rubus idaeus). Annals of Applied Biology, 92(3):359-368

Williamson B, Ramsay AM, 1981. Prospects for control of cane blight in machine-harvested raspberries. Williams, G. H. (Compiler): Crop protection in Northern Britain. Proceedings of a conference held at Dundee University 17-19 March 1981. West of Scotland Agricultural College. Auchincruive, Ayr UK, 281-285

Williamson B, Ramsay AM, 1984. Effects of straddle-harvester design on cane blight (Leptosphaeria coniothyrium) of red raspberry. Annals of Applied Biology, 105(1):177-184

Wright CJ, Waister PD, 1982. Within-plant competition in the red raspberry. I. Primocane growth. Journal of Horticultural Science, 57(4):437-442.

Wright CJ, Waister PD, 1982. Within-plant competition in the red raspberry. II. Fruiting cane growth. Journal of Horticultural Science, 57(4):443-448.

Distribution Maps

Top of page
You can pan and zoom the map
Save map