Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Grapholita prunivora
(plum moth)

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Datasheet

Grapholita prunivora (plum moth)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 14 July 2018
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Pest
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Grapholita prunivora
  • Preferred Common Name
  • plum moth
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Metazoa
  •     Phylum: Arthropoda
  •       Subphylum: Uniramia
  •         Class: Insecta

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Grapholita prunivora (plum moth); larva in fruit of Crataegus holmesiana.
TitleLarva
CaptionGrapholita prunivora (plum moth); larva in fruit of Crataegus holmesiana.
Copyright©New York State Ag. Exp. Station, USA
Grapholita prunivora (plum moth); larva in fruit of Crataegus holmesiana.
LarvaGrapholita prunivora (plum moth); larva in fruit of Crataegus holmesiana. ©New York State Ag. Exp. Station, USA
Grapholita prunivora (plum moth); blossom end of apple fruit with damage.
TitleSymptoms
CaptionGrapholita prunivora (plum moth); blossom end of apple fruit with damage.
Copyright©New York State Ag. Exp. Station, USA
Grapholita prunivora (plum moth); blossom end of apple fruit with damage.
SymptomsGrapholita prunivora (plum moth); blossom end of apple fruit with damage. ©New York State Ag. Exp. Station, USA
Grapholita prunivora (plum moth); adult (museum set specimen).
TitleAdult
CaptionGrapholita prunivora (plum moth); adult (museum set specimen).
Copyright©Lynn Meijerman
Grapholita prunivora (plum moth); adult (museum set specimen).
AdultGrapholita prunivora (plum moth); adult (museum set specimen).©Lynn Meijerman
Grapholita prunivora (plum moth); female genitalia.
TitleGenitalia
CaptionGrapholita prunivora (plum moth); female genitalia.
Copyright©Lynn Meijerman
Grapholita prunivora (plum moth); female genitalia.
GenitaliaGrapholita prunivora (plum moth); female genitalia.©Lynn Meijerman
Male genitalia of G. prunivora (aedeagus omitted).
TitleGenitalia
CaptionMale genitalia of G. prunivora (aedeagus omitted).
Copyright©Lynn Meijerman
Male genitalia of G. prunivora (aedeagus omitted).
GenitaliaMale genitalia of G. prunivora (aedeagus omitted).©Lynn Meijerman

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Grapholita prunivora (Walsh)

Preferred Common Name

  • plum moth

Other Scientific Names

  • Cydia prunivora (Walsh
  • Enarmonia prunivora (Walsh)
  • Grapholitha prunivora
  • Laspeyresia prunivora (Walsh)
  • Semasia prunivora Walsh

International Common Names

  • English: lesser appleworm
  • French: carpocapse (petit) de la pomme; petite pyrale

EPPO code

  • LASPPR (Cydia prunivora)

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Metazoa
  •         Phylum: Arthropoda
  •             Subphylum: Uniramia
  •                 Class: Insecta
  •                     Order: Lepidoptera
  •                         Family: Tortricidae
  •                             Genus: Grapholita
  •                                 Species: Grapholita prunivora

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Growth Stages

Top of page Flowering stage, Fruiting stage

List of Symptoms/Signs

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SignLife StagesType
Fruit / frass visible
Fruit / internal feeding

Natural enemies

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Natural enemyTypeLife stagesSpecificityReferencesBiological control inBiological control on
Ascogaster quadridentatus Parasite Larvae

Plant Trade

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Plant parts liable to carry the pest in trade/transportPest stagesBorne internallyBorne externallyVisibility of pest or symptoms
Bark pupae Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Flowers/Inflorescences/Cones/Calyx larvae Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Fruits (inc. pods) eggs; larvae; pupae Yes Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Growing medium accompanying plants pupae Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Leaves eggs Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Stems (above ground)/Shoots/Trunks/Branches larvae; pupae Yes Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Plant parts not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Bulbs/Tubers/Corms/Rhizomes
Roots
Seedlings/Micropropagated plants
True seeds (inc. grain)
Wood

References

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Adler CRL, 1991. Identification of pupae on apple in eastern north America. In: Van der Geest LPS, Evenhuis HH, eds. Tortricid Pests, their Biology, Natural Enemies and Control. Amsterdam, Netherlands: Elsevier, 51-64.

Arakawa Y, 1927. Studies on moths infesting apples in Manchuria (in Japanese). Manchuria and Mongolia. Koshurei, Manchuria.

Bostonian NJ; Vincent C; Pitre D; Simard LG, 1989. Chemical control of key and secondary arthropod pests of Quebec apple orchards. Applied Agricultural Research, 4:179-184.

Brown EE, 1953. Life cycle of lesser appleworm in north-eastern Oregon. Journal of Economic Entomology, 46:163.

Carde RT; Baker TC; Castrovillo PJ, 1977. Disruption of sexual communication in Laspeyresia pomonella (codling moth), Grapholita molesta (oriental fruit moth) and G. prunivora (lesser appleworm) with hollow fiber attractant sources. Entomologia Experimentalis et Applicata, 22(3):280-288

Chapman PJ; Lienk SE, 1971. Tortricid fauna of apple in New York. Special Publications, Agricultural Experimental Station, Cornell University, Geneva, New York State, 46-48.

CIE, 1975. Distribution Maps of Pests, Series A, No. 339. Wallingford, UK: CAB International.

EPPO, 1990. Specific quarantine requirements. EPPO Technical Documents, No. 1008. Paris, France: European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization.

EPPO, 2014. PQR database. Paris, France: European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization. http://www.eppo.int/DATABASES/pqr/pqr.htm

FAO, 1984. International plant quarantine treatment manual. FAO Plant Production and Protection Paper, No. 50, Rome, Italy: FAO, 94-96.

Glass EH; Lienk SE, 1971. Apple insect and mite populations developing after discontinuance of insecticides: 10 year record. Journal of Economic Entomology, 64:23-26.

Hull LA; Pfeiffer DG; Biddinger DJ, 1995. Apple direct pests. In: Hogmire HW, ed. Mid-Atlantic Orchard Monitoring Guide. New York, USA: NRAES.

Mid-Atlantic Regional Fruit Loop, 2001. The Virginia Fruit Page: Fruit IPM: Apple: The Lesser Appleworm. World wide web page at http://www.ento.vt.edu/Fruitfiles/law.html.

OEPP/EPPO, 1979. Data sheets on quarantine organisms No. 4 Angiosorus solani. OEPP/EPPO Bulletin, 9(2).

Pfeiffer DG; Killian JC, 1988. Disruption of olfactory communication in Oriental fruit moth and lesser appleworm in a Virginia peach orchard. Journal of Agricultural Entomology, 5(4):235-241

Prokopy RJ; Mason JL; Christie M; Wright SE, 1996. Arthropod pest and natural enemy abundance under second-level versus first-level integrated pest management practices in apple orchards: a 4-year study. Agriculture, Ecosystems and Environment, 57:35-47.

Quaintance AL, 1908. The lesser appleworm. Bulletin, Bureau of Entomology, US Department of Agriculture, 68:49-60.

Rivard I; Mailloux M, 1974. Grapholitha prunivora (Walsh) dans les pommeraies du sud-ouest du QuTbec. Phytoprotection, 55:29-32.

Distribution Maps

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