Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Ipomoea quamoclit
(cypress vine)

Rojas-Sandoval J, 2018. Ipomoea quamoclit (cypress vine). Invasive Species Compendium. Wallingford, UK: CABI. DOI:10.1079/ISC.28796.20203483413

Toolbox

Datasheet

Ipomoea quamoclit (cypress vine)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 19 June 2020
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Invasive Species
  • Pest
  • Host Plant
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Ipomoea quamoclit
  • Preferred Common Name
  • cypress vine
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Plantae
  •     Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •       Subphylum: Angiospermae
  •         Class: Dicotyledonae
  • Summary of Invasiveness
  • Ipomoea quamoclit is a fast-growing vine, native to Mexico and Central America, and widely cultivated and introduced to many countries as an ornamental for its attractive foliage and bright flowers. It has escaped from cultivation to beco...

Don't need the entire report?

Generate a print friendly version containing only the sections you need.

Generate report

Pictures

Top of page
PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Ipomoea quamoclit (cypress vine); flower. Kerala, India. September 2012.
TitleFlower
CaptionIpomoea quamoclit (cypress vine); flower. Kerala, India. September 2012.
Copyright©Rameshng/via wikipedia - CC BY-SA 3.0
Ipomoea quamoclit (cypress vine); flower. Kerala, India. September 2012.
FlowerIpomoea quamoclit (cypress vine); flower. Kerala, India. September 2012.©Rameshng/via wikipedia - CC BY-SA 3.0
Ipomoea quamoclit (cypress vine); flower. Kerala, India. September 2012.
TitleFlower
CaptionIpomoea quamoclit (cypress vine); flower. Kerala, India. September 2012.
Copyright©Rameshng/via wikipedia - CC BY-SA 3.0
Ipomoea quamoclit (cypress vine); flower. Kerala, India. September 2012.
FlowerIpomoea quamoclit (cypress vine); flower. Kerala, India. September 2012.©Rameshng/via wikipedia - CC BY-SA 3.0
Ipomoea quamoclit (cypress vine); habit. India. September 2009.
TitleHabit
CaptionIpomoea quamoclit (cypress vine); habit. India. September 2009.
Copyright©Dinesh Valke/via flickr - CC BY-SA 2.0
Ipomoea quamoclit (cypress vine); habit. India. September 2009.
HabitIpomoea quamoclit (cypress vine); habit. India. September 2009.©Dinesh Valke/via flickr - CC BY-SA 2.0

Identity

Top of page

Preferred Scientific Name

  • Ipomoea quamoclit L.

Preferred Common Name

  • cypress vine

Other Scientific Names

  • Convolvulus pennatifolius Salisb.
  • Convolvulus pennatus Desr.
  • Convolvulus quamoclit (L.) Spreng.
  • Quamoclit pennata (RAF.) DESV.
  • Quamoclit pinnata (Des.) Bojer
  • Quamoclit vulgaris Choisy

International Common Names

  • English: cardinal climber; cypress-vine morning-glory; hummingbird flower; hummingbird vine; morning glory; star glory; star of Bethlehem; sweet Willy
  • Spanish: cambustera; campanita roja; clavellina; regadero
  • French: cheveux de Venus; liane rouge
  • Portuguese: Cardeal; corda-de-viola; corriola; esqueletinho-de-jardim; esqueleto; primavera

Local Common Names

  • Australia: Cupid's flower
  • Bangladesh: getphul; kamalata; kunjalata; tarulata
  • Cuba: cambustera de hojas anchas; cambustera de hojas menudas; cambustera fina; cambutera; gambutera
  • Dominican Republic: estrella del son
  • El Salvador: clarincito; clavellina; corona
  • Guatemala: Clarín; clarincillo
  • Lesser Antilles: goutte de sang; herbe à éternuer; liane rouge; lin; regadero; sweet william
  • Nicaragua: Fin de amor
  • Panama: Cundeamor
  • Puerto Rico: bejuco de ciprés; bejuco de coral

EPPO code

  • IPOQU (Ipomoea quamoclit)

Summary of Invasiveness

Top of page

Ipomoea quamoclit is a fast-growing vine, native to Mexico and Central America, and widely cultivated and introduced to many countries as an ornamental for its attractive foliage and bright flowers. It has escaped from cultivation to become naturalized and invasive in a variety of habitats, where it competes with native vine species and behaves as an agricultural weed. It is listed as invasive in Australia, Papua New Guinea, India, the United States, Brazil, the Galapagos Islands, Costa Rica, Cuba, the Maldives, the Seychelles and many islands in the Pacific Ocean.

Taxonomic Tree

Top of page
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Plantae
  •         Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •             Subphylum: Angiospermae
  •                 Class: Dicotyledonae
  •                     Order: Solanales
  •                         Family: Convolvulaceae
  •                             Genus: Ipomoea
  •                                 Species: Ipomoea quamoclit

Notes on Taxonomy and Nomenclature

Top of page

Ipomoea is a large and complex genus of vines and shrubs within the Convolvulaceae. This family comprises approximately 1,880 species grouped in 55–60 genera (Stevens, 2012). It is nearly cosmopolitan in distribution, but its members are primarily tropical plants (Stefanović et al., 2003). The genus Ipomoea includes about 600 species distributed worldwide, with approximately 500 species occurring in tropical and warm temperate regions of the Americas (Miller et al., 1999). 

The taxonomy and nomenclature of many Ipomoea species is still uncertain.  For instance, the names Ipomoea hederacea, I. indica, I. nil and I. purpurea have caused identification and nomenclatural problems since Linnaeus revised his own treatment of the taxa in 1762. Since then, many botanists have mixed these species, and the nomenclature still remains unclear. Authors have noted that the taxonomic confusion may be due to the morphological plasticity observed when plants grow in wet and dry habitats, and the extensive cultivation as ornamentals (Austin, 1986; Austin and Huáman, 1996).  

Ipomoea quamoclit is listed as an accepted name by World Flora Online (2020).

About 55 species of Ipomoea have been listed as weeds by Holm et al. (1979), and 173 species are included in the Global Compendium of Weeds (Randall, 2017).  Species such as Ipomoea alba, I. batatas, I. cairica, I. carnea subsp. fistulosa, I. hederifolia, I. nil, I. ochracea, I. purpurea, and I. quamoclit are often listed as aggressive invaders worldwide (GRIIS, 2017; DAISIE, 2017; PIER, 2018; USDA-NRCS, 2018).  The hybrid between I. quamoclit and I. hederifolia known as Ipomoea × multifida is also popular in the horticultural trade.

Description

Top of page

A slender vine not exceeding a stem diameter of 2 cm. Leaves compound with 16-24 leaflets, basal pair of leaflets bilobed. Leaflet stalks absent. 2. Leaves simple and deeply lobed (pinnatisect) almost to the midrib, each leaf about 2.5-4.5 ×2.5-4 cm, petioles about 1-4 cm long. Lobes 8-15 per leaf. Very small finely divided leaves usually on the twig at the base of each petiole. Flowers about 1.7-3.5 cm diameter. Peduncles about 4-8 cm long. Pedicels about 1.4-2 cm long. Sepals about 5-6 mm long, each sepal ending in a mucronate tip which is attached below the apex of the sepal. Inner surface clothed in small flat glands. Corolla tube about 2.5-3.5 cm long. Corolla lobes about 6-8 mm long, mucronate at the apex. Staminal filaments clothed in hairs towards the base. Style about 25-30 mm long. Stigma about 1 mm diameter, verrucose, obscurely 2-lobed. Fruits ovoid, 5-7 × 5 mm, sepals persistent at the base. Seeds usually 3 or 4 per fruit. Seeds elongate, about 5-6 × 2-3 mm, surface clothed in hairs and warty projections particularly around the hilum. Cotyledons folded with endosperm between the folds. Radicle straight, about 2 mm long (Australian Tropical Rainforest Plants, 2010).

Plant Type

Top of page
Annual
Biennial
Herbaceous
Seed propagated
Vine / climber

Distribution

Top of page

Ipomoea quamoclit is native to Mexico and probably Central America (Staples, 2017). It has been widely cultivated as an ornamental and can be found naturalized in North America, South America (including Brazil; note that Flora do Brasil (2020) says that it is native there), the West Indies, Australia, and tropical and temperate Asia and Africa, and on many islands in the Pacific region (GRIIS, 2017; PIER, 2018; Staples, 2017; USDA-ARS, 2018; USDA-NRCS, 2018).

Distribution Table

Top of page

The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Last updated: 10 Feb 2022
Continent/Country/Region Distribution Last Reported Origin First Reported Invasive Reference Notes

Africa

AngolaPresentIntroduced
BeninPresentIntroduced
BurundiPresentIntroduced
Cabo VerdePresentIntroduced
CameroonPresentIntroduced
Central African RepublicPresentIntroduced
ChadPresentIntroduced
ComorosPresentIntroduced
Congo, Democratic Republic of thePresentIntroduced
Côte d'IvoirePresentIntroduced
Equatorial GuineaPresentIntroduced
GabonPresentIntroduced
GambiaPresentIntroduced
GuineaPresentIntroduced
Guinea-BissauPresentIntroduced
LiberiaPresentIntroduced
MadagascarPresentIntroduced
MalawiPresentIntroduced
MauritiusPresentIntroduced
MayottePresentIntroduced
MozambiquePresentIntroduced
RéunionPresentIntroduced
SenegalPresentIntroduced
SeychellesPresentIntroducedInvasive
Sierra LeonePresentIntroduced
TanzaniaPresentIntroduced
TogoPresentIntroduced

Asia

BangladeshPresentIntroduced
BhutanPresentIntroduced1999As: Ipomoea quamoclit
BruneiPresentIntroduced
CambodiaPresentIntroduced
ChinaPresentIntroduced1930As: Ipomoea quamoclit
IndiaPresentIntroducedInvasive
-Arunachal PradeshPresentIntroducedInvasive
-Himachal PradeshPresentIntroducedInvasive
-Jammu and KashmirPresentIntroducedInvasive
-ManipurPresentIntroducedInvasive
-MeghalayaPresentIntroducedInvasive
-MizoramPresentIntroducedInvasive
-NagalandPresentIntroducedInvasive
-OdishaPresent
-SikkimPresentIntroducedInvasive
-TripuraPresentIntroducedInvasive
-UttarakhandPresentIntroducedInvasive
-West BengalPresentIntroducedInvasive
IndonesiaPresentIntroducedAs well as Sulawesi and the Lesser Sunda Islands, WCSP (2020) says that species is introduced in Borneo, but does not indicate whether this is the Indonesian part, the Malaysian part or both
-Lesser Sunda IslandsPresentIntroduced
-SulawesiPresentIntroduced
JapanPresentIntroduced
LaosPresentIntroduced
MalaysiaPresentIntroducedNaturalizedPeninsular Malaysia. In addition, WCSP (2020) states that the species is introduced in Borneo, but does not indicate whether this is the Indonesian part, the Malaysian part or both.
-Peninsular MalaysiaPresentIntroducedNaturalized
MaldivesPresentIntroducedInvasive
MyanmarPresentIntroduced
NepalPresentIntroduced
PakistanPresentIntroduced
PhilippinesPresentIntroduced
SingaporePresentIntroducedNaturalizedCultivated and naturalized
South KoreaPresentIntroduced
Sri LankaPresentIntroduced
TaiwanPresentIntroduced1896As: Ipomoea quamoclit
ThailandPresentIntroduced
VietnamPresentIntroduced

Europe

PortugalPresent, LocalizedIntroducedMadeira only
-MadeiraPresentIntroduced
RussiaPresent, LocalizedIntroducedPrimorye (Far east) only
-Russian Far EastPresent, LocalizedIntroducedPrimorye

North America

Antigua and BarbudaPresentIntroduced
BahamasPresentIntroduced
BarbadosPresentIntroduced
BelizePresentNative
BermudaPresentIntroduced
CanadaPresentPresent, based on regional distribution
-OntarioPresentIntroduced
Costa RicaPresentInvasiveSources differ as to whether it is native or introduced
CubaPresentIntroducedInvasive
DominicaPresentIntroduced
Dominican RepublicPresentIntroduced
GrenadaPresentIntroduced
GuadeloupePresentIntroduced
GuatemalaPresentNative
HaitiPresentIntroduced
HondurasPresentNative
JamaicaPresentIntroduced
MartiniquePresentIntroduced
MexicoPresentNative
Netherlands AntillesPresentIntroduced
NicaraguaPresentNative
PanamaPresentNative
Puerto RicoPresentIntroducedCommon weed
Saint Kitts and NevisPresentIntroduced
Saint LuciaPresentIntroduced
Saint MartinPresentIntroduced
Saint Vincent and the GrenadinesPresentIntroduced
Trinidad and TobagoPresentIntroduced
U.S. Virgin IslandsPresentIntroduced
United StatesPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-ArkansasPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-CaliforniaPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-FloridaPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-GeorgiaPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-HawaiiPresentIntroducedInvasive
-IllinoisPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-IndianaPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-KansasPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-KentuckyPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-LouisianaPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-MarylandPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-MississippiPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-MissouriPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-New YorkPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-North CarolinaPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-OklahomaPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-PennsylvaniaPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-South CarolinaPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-TennesseePresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-TexasPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed
-VirginiaPresentIntroducedInvasiveNoxious weed

Oceania

AustraliaPresentIntroducedInvasive
-New South WalesPresentIntroducedInvasive
-Northern TerritoryPresentIntroducedInvasive
-QueenslandPresentIntroducedInvasive
-Western AustraliaPresentIntroducedInvasive
Christmas IslandPresentIntroduced
Federated States of MicronesiaPresentIntroducedInvasive
-KosraePresentIntroducedInvasive
-PohnpeiPresentIntroducedInvasive
FijiPresentIntroducedInvasive
French PolynesiaPresentIntroduced
KiribatiPresentIntroducedInvasive
New CaledoniaPresentIntroducedInvasive
NiuePresentIntroduced
Northern Mariana IslandsPresentIntroduced
PalauPresentIntroduced
Papua New GuineaPresentIntroducedInvasive
SamoaPresentIntroduced
Solomon IslandsPresentIntroduced
VanuatuPresentIntroduced
Wallis and FutunaPresentIntroduced

South America

ArgentinaPresentIntroduced
BoliviaPresentIntroduced
BrazilPresentListed as a common weed and harmful plant; one source says that it is invasive. Sources differ as to whether it is native or introduced.
-AcrePresentNative
-AlagoasPresentNative
-AmazonasPresentNative
-BahiaPresentNative
-CearaPresentNative
-Distrito FederalPresentNative
-Espirito SantoPresentNative
-GoiasPresentNative
-MaranhaoPresentNative
-Mato GrossoPresentNative
-Mato Grosso do SulPresentNative
-Minas GeraisPresentNative
-ParaPresentNative
-ParaibaPresentNative
-ParanaPresentNative
-PernambucoPresentNative
-PiauiPresentNative
-Rio de JaneiroPresentNative
-Rio Grande do NortePresentNative
-Rio Grande do SulPresentNative
-RondoniaPresentNative
-Santa CatarinaPresentNative
-Sao PauloPresentNative
-SergipePresentNative
-TocantinsPresentNative
ColombiaPresentIntroduced
EcuadorPresentIntroduced
-Galapagos IslandsPresentIntroducedInvasive
French GuianaPresentIntroduced
GuyanaPresentIntroduced
ParaguayPresentIntroduced
PeruPresentIntroduced
SurinamePresentIntroduced
UruguayPresentIntroduced
VenezuelaPresentIntroduced

History of Introduction and Spread

Top of page

Ipomoea quamoclit was apparently introduced to the Old World in early post-Colombian times (Flora of Panama, 2017), and has since been widely introduced there. In Australia, it was apparently introduced from India, but the date of introduction is unknown (Queensland Government, 2018).

Risk of Introduction

Top of page

The risk of introduction of Ipomoea quamoclit is very high. Like many other Ipomoea species, it is widely cultivated as an ornamental in tropical, subtropical and warm temperate regions. Seeds and seedlings can easily be obtained in plant nurseries around the world and online on horticulture websites.

Habitat

Top of page

Ipomoea quamoclit can be found growing in moist thickets, the edges of moist and rain forests, mangroves, riparian areas, disturbed sites, and secondary forests.  It is frequently abundant as a weed in cultivated areas and along roadsides at elevations from near sea level to about 1800 m (Smith, 1991; PIER, 2018; Queensland Government, 2018).

Habitat List

Top of page
CategorySub-CategoryHabitatPresenceStatus
Terrestrial ManagedCultivated / agricultural land Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial ManagedCultivated / agricultural land Present, no further details Natural
Terrestrial ManagedManaged forests, plantations and orchards Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial ManagedDisturbed areas Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial ManagedDisturbed areas Present, no further details Natural
Terrestrial ManagedRail / roadsides Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial ManagedRail / roadsides Present, no further details Natural
Terrestrial ManagedUrban / peri-urban areas Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial ManagedUrban / peri-urban areas Present, no further details Natural
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalNatural forests Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalNatural forests Present, no further details Natural
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalRiverbanks Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalRiverbanks Present, no further details Natural
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalWetlands Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial Natural / Semi-naturalWetlands Present, no further details Natural

Hosts/Species Affected

Top of page

Ipomoea quamoclit is listed as a weed in peanut, cotton, and citrus plantations (Vibrans, 2011; Anon., 2016.).

Host Plants and Other Plants Affected

Top of page
Plant nameFamilyContextReferences
Arachis hypogaea (groundnut)FabaceaeMain
Citrus spp.Main
Gossypium hirsutum (Bourbon cotton)MalvaceaeMain

Growth Stages

Top of page
Flowering stage, Fruiting stage, Vegetative growing stage

Biology and Ecology

Top of page

Genetics

The chromosome number reported for Ipomoea quamoclit is 2n = 30 (Sinha and Sharma, 1992).

Reproductive Biology

Ipomoea quamoclit has hermaphroditic flowers; in its native distribution range, these are visited and pollinated by hummingbirds (Marais and Rausher, 2010; Missouri Botanical Garden, 2018).  To be able to thrive in areas outside its native range and/or without hummingbirds, this species must rely on other pollinators or reproduce by either selfing or apomixis.

Physiology and Phenology

In Central America, Ipomoea quamoclit has been recorded flowering and fruiting from June to January/February (Flora of Panama, 2017). In Mexico, it produces flowers and fruits from August to December (Vibrans, 2011). In Pakistan it flowers from August to October (Flora of Pakistan, 2018).

Environmental Requirements

Ipomoea quamoclit tolerates dry conditions but performs best in moist habitats. It can grow on sandy or loamy soils with pH in the range 6.1 – 7.8. It prefers open sunny areas (Vibrans, 2011; Missouri Botanical Garden, 2018).

Climate

Top of page
ClimateStatusDescriptionRemark
Af - Tropical rainforest climate Preferred > 60mm precipitation per month
Am - Tropical monsoon climate Preferred Tropical monsoon climate ( < 60mm precipitation driest month but > (100 - [total annual precipitation(mm}/25]))
As - Tropical savanna climate with dry summer Preferred < 60mm precipitation driest month (in summer) and < (100 - [total annual precipitation{mm}/25])
Aw - Tropical wet and dry savanna climate Preferred < 60mm precipitation driest month (in winter) and < (100 - [total annual precipitation{mm}/25])
Cs - Warm temperate climate with dry summer Tolerated Warm average temp. > 10°C, Cold average temp. > 0°C, dry summers
Cw - Warm temperate climate with dry winter Tolerated Warm temperate climate with dry winter (Warm average temp. > 10°C, Cold average temp. > 0°C, dry winters)
Cf - Warm temperate climate, wet all year Tolerated Warm average temp. > 10°C, Cold average temp. > 0°C, wet all year

Latitude/Altitude Ranges

Top of page
Latitude North (°N)Latitude South (°S)Altitude Lower (m)Altitude Upper (m)
40 35 1800

Rainfall Regime

Top of page
Bimodal
Uniform

Soil Tolerances

Top of page

Soil drainage

  • free

Soil reaction

  • neutral

Soil texture

  • light
  • medium

Natural enemies

Top of page
Natural enemyTypeLife stagesSpecificityReferencesBiological control inBiological control on
Albugo Pathogen Other|All Stages not specific USDA-NRCS (2018)
Ceratobasidium ochroleucum Pathogen Other|All Stages not specific USDA-NRCS (2018)
Macrophomina phaseolina Pathogen Other|All Stages not specific USDA-NRCS (2018)

Notes on Natural Enemies

Top of page

When growing in gardens, plants of Ipomoea quamoclit have been reported to be infected by white blister Albugo spp., charcoal rot Macrophomina phaseolina and thread blight Corticium stevensii [Ceratobasidium ochroleucum] (USDA-NRCS, 2018).

Means of Movement and Dispersal

Top of page

Ipomoea quamoclit spreads by seeds, which can be dispersed by rain, waterways, gravity, and human activity (Australian Tropical Rainforest Plants, 2010).  It has been widely introduced around the world as an ornamental plant.

Pathway Causes

Top of page
CauseNotesLong DistanceLocalReferences
Escape from confinement or garden escapeEscaped from gardens Yes USDA-NRCS (2018)
Garden waste disposalSeeds in garden waste Yes Australian Tropical Rainforest Plants (2010)
HitchhikerSeeds in garden waste Yes Australian Tropical Rainforest Plants (2010)
HorticultureWidely cultivated as an ornamental Yes Yes USDA-NRCS (2018)
Intentional releaseWidely cultivated as an ornamental Yes Yes USDA-NRCS (2018)
Internet salesSold on horticulture websites Yes Yes
Ornamental purposesWidely cultivated as an ornamental Yes Yes USDA-NRCS (2018)

Impact Summary

Top of page
CategoryImpact
Cultural/amenity Positive
Economic/livelihood Positive and negative
Environment (generally) Negative

Economic Impact

Top of page

Ipomoea quamoclit behaves as an agricultural weed with negative impacts on peanut, cotton, and citrus plantations (Vibrans, 2011; Anon., 2016).

Environmental Impact

Top of page

Ipomoea quamoclit is an aggressive vine that has escaped from cultivation. In Australia, it has smothered and outcompeted native trees and shrubs and is becoming increasingly problematic, primarily in the Northern Territory where it has covered grass swards; in Queensland, it is invading mangroves, rainforest and eucalypt forest (Csurhes and Edwards, 1998; Queensland Government, 2018).  In the United States it is listed as a noxious weed and often invades cultivated fields, secondary forests, roadsides and disturbed areas (USDA-NRCS, 2018). In Brazil, it is listed as a “harmful weed” (Anon., 2016).

Risk and Impact Factors

Top of page
Invasiveness
  • Proved invasive outside its native range
  • Has a broad native range
  • Highly adaptable to different environments
  • Is a habitat generalist
  • Tolerates, or benefits from, cultivation, browsing pressure, mutilation, fire etc
  • Pioneering in disturbed areas
  • Benefits from human association (i.e. it is a human commensal)
  • Fast growing
Impact outcomes
  • Ecosystem change/ habitat alteration
  • Host damage
  • Modification of successional patterns
  • Negatively impacts agriculture
  • Reduced native biodiversity
Impact mechanisms
  • Competition - monopolizing resources
  • Competition - shading
  • Competition - smothering
  • Rapid growth
Likelihood of entry/control
  • Highly likely to be transported internationally deliberately

Uses

Top of page

Ipomoea quamoclit is widely cultivated as an ornamental plant for its attractive foliage and bright flowers. (USDA-NRCS, 2018; USDA-ARS, 2018; Queensland Government, 2018). The hybrid between I. quamoclit and I. hederifolia known as Ipomoea × multifida is also popular in the horticultural trade. I. quamoclit has traditional medicinal uses, and there has been some research on its possible medicinal effects (Ho et al., 2015)

Uses List

Top of page

Environmental

  • Amenity

Medicinal, pharmaceutical

  • Traditional/folklore

Ornamental

  • garden plant

Prevention and Control

Top of page

Due to the variable regulations around (de)registration of pesticides, your national list of registered pesticides or relevant authority should be consulted to determine which products are legally allowed for use in your country when considering chemical control. Pesticides should always be used in a lawful manner, consistent with the product's label.

There is no information available on the control and/or management of this species.

References

Top of page

Anon., 2016. Weeds On Line. (Plantas Daninhas On Line). Brazil: Editora Agroverde.http://www.plantasdaninhasonline.com.br/

Austin DF, 1986. Nomenclature of the Ipomoea nil Complex (Convolvulaceae). Taxon, 35(2), 355-358.

Austin, D. F., Huáman, Z., 1996. A synopsis of Ipomoea (Convolvulaceae) in the Americas. Taxon, 45(1), 3-38. doi: 10.2307/1222581

Australian Tropical Rainforest Plants, 2010. Australian Tropical Rainforest Plants. Version 6.1 - December 2010. In: Australian Tropical Rainforest Plants. Version 6.1 - December 2010 Queensland, Australia: CSIRO.http://keys.trin.org.au/key-server/data/0e0f0504-0103-430d-8004-060d07080d04/media/Html/index.html

Broome, R., Sabir, K., Carrington, S., 2007. Plants of the Eastern Caribbean. Online database. In: Plants of the Eastern Caribbean. Online database , Barbados: University of the West Indies.http://ecflora.cavehill.uwi.edu/index.html

Chacón, E, Saborío, G, 2012. Invasive species in Costa Rica. (Especies Invasoras en Costa Rica). San José, Costa Rica: Asociación para la Conservación y el Estudio de la Biodiversidad.http://invasoras.acebio.org

Charles Darwin Foundation, 2008. Database inventory of introduced plant species in the rural and urban zones of Galapagos. In: Database inventory of introduced plant species in the rural and urban zones of Galapagos Galapagos, Ecuador: Charles Darwin Foundation.unpaginated.

Chong, K. Y., Tan, H. T. W., Corlett, R. T., 2009. A checklist of the total vascular plant flora of Singapore: native, naturalised and cultivated species, Singapore: Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, National University of Singapore.273 pp. https://lkcnhm.nus.edu.sg/app/uploads/2017/04/flora_of_singapore_tc.pdf

Csurhes, S., Edwards, R., 1998. Potential environmental weeds in Australia: candidate species for preventive control, Canberra, Australia: Biodiversity Group, Environmental Australia.202 pp. http://www.environment.gov.au/biodiversity/invasive/weeds/publications/books/pubs/potential.pdf

DAISIE, 2017. Delivering Alien Invasive Species Inventories for Europe. In: Delivering Alien Invasive Species Inventories for Europe . http://www.europe-aliens.org/

Flora do Brasil, 2020. Brazilian flora 2020. In: Brazilian flora 2020 Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Rio de Janeiro Botanic Garden.http://floradobrasil.jbrj.gov.br

Flora of Pakistan, 2018. Flora of Pakistan/Pakistan Plant Database (PPD). Tropicos website. In: Flora of Pakistan/Pakistan Plant Database (PPD). Tropicos website St. Louis, Missouri and Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA: Missouri Botanical Garden and Harvard University Herbaria.http://www.tropicos.org/Project/Pakistan

Flora of Panama, 2017. Flora of Panama (WFO). In: Flora of Panama (WFO) St. Louis, Missouri and Cambridge, MA, USA: Missouri Botanical Garden and Harvard University Herbaria.http://www.tropicos.org/Project/FOPWFO

Florence, J, Chevillotte, H, Ollier, C, Meyer, J-Y, 2013. Nadeaud botanical database of the Herbarium of French Polynesia. (Base de données botaniques Nadeaud de l'Herbier de la Polynésie Française (PAP)). http://www.herbier-tahiti.pf

GRIIS, 2017. Global Register of Introduced and Invasive Species. http://www.griis.org/

Herrera, K., Lorence, D. H., Flynn, T., Balick, M. J., 2010. Checklist of the Vascular Plants of Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia with Local Names and Uses. Allertonia, 10, 1-192. https://www.jstor.org/stable/23193787

Ho KetLi, Chung WeiErn, Choong KahEe, Cheah YanLi, Phua EeYing, Ramamurthy Srinivasan, 2015. Anti-proliferative activity and preliminary phytochemical screening of Ipomoea quamoclit leaf extracts. Research Journal of Medicinal Plant, 9(3), 127-134. http://scialert.net/fulltext/?doi=rjmp.2015.127.134&org=10

Holm, L., Pancho, J. V., Herberger, J. P., Plucknett, D. L., 1979. A geographical atlas of world weeds, New York, Chichester (), Brisbane, Toronto, UK: John Wiley and Sons.xlix + 391 pp.

MacKee, H. S., 1994. Catalogue des plantes introduites et cultivées en Nouvelle-Calédonie, Paris, France: Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle.164 pp.

Malaysia Biodiversity Information System, 2020. Malaysia Biodiversity Information System. Putrajaya, Malaysia: Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources.https://www.mybis.gov.my/

Marais, D. L. des, Rausher, M. D., 2010. Parallel evolution at multiple levels in the origin of hummingbird pollinated flowers in Ipomoea. Evolution : International Journal of Organic Evolution, 64(7), 2044-2054. http://www.blackwell-synergy.com/loi/evo

Más, EG, Lugo-Torres, ML, 2013. Common Weeds in Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands. (Malezas Comunes en Puerto Rico e Islas Vírgenes Americanas). University of Puerto Rico and USDA Servicio de Conservación de Recursos Naturales, Área del Caribe/Caribbean Area.395 pp. https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/plantmaterials/newsroom/feature/?cid=stelprdb1078250

Miller, R. E., Rausher, M. D., Manos, P. S., 1999. Phylogenetic systematics of Ipomoea (Convolvulaceae) based on ITS and Waxy sequences. Systematic Botany, 24(2), 209-227. doi: 10.2307/2419549

Missouri Botanical Garden, 2018. Tropicos database. In: Tropicos database St. Louis, Missouri, USA: Missouri Botanical Garden.http://www.tropicos.org/

Oviedo Prieto, R., González-Oliva, L., 2015. National list of invasive and potentially invasive plants in the Republic of Cuba - 2015. (Lista nacional de plantas invasoras y potencialmente invasoras en la República de Cuba - 2015). Bissea: Boletín sobre Conservación de Plantas del Jardín Botánico Nacional de Cuba, 9(Special Issue No. 2), 1-88. http://repositorio.geotech.cu/jspui/bitstream/1234/1476/4/Lista%20nacional%20de%20plantas%20invasoras%20de%20Cuba-2015.pdf

PIER, 2018. Pacific Islands Ecosystems at Risk. In: Pacific Islands Ecosystems at Risk Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: HEAR, University of Hawaii.http://www.hear.org/pier/index.html

POWO, 2020. Plants of the World Online. In: Plants of the World Online London, UK: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org

Queensland Government, 2017. Weeds of Australia, Biosecurity Queensland Edition. In: Weeds of Australia, Biosecurity Queensland Edition , Australia: Queensland Government.http://keyserver.lucidcentral.org/weeds/data/media/Html/search.html

Queensland Government, 2018. Weeds of Australia, Biosecurity Queensland Edition. In: Weeds of Australia, Biosecurity Queensland Edition , Australia: Queensland Government.http://keyserver.lucidcentral.org/weeds/data/media/Html/search.html

Randall, R. P., 2017. A global compendium of weeds, (Ed.3) [ed. by Randall, R. P.]. Perth, Australia: R. P. Randall.iii + 3653 pp.

Sekar, K. C., Manikandan, R., Srivastava, S. K., 2012. Invasive alien plants of Uttarakhand Himalaya. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences India. Section B, Biological Sciences, 82(3), 375-383. http://www.springerlink.com/content/p320x5877g574708/

Sinha, S., Sharma, S. N., 1992. Taxonomic significance of karyomorphology in Ipomoea spp. Cytologia, 57(3), 289-293. doi: 10.1508/cytologia.57.289

Smith, A. C., 1991. Flora vitiensis nova. A new flora of Fiji, Vol. 5, Lawaii, Hawaii, USA: Pacific Tropical Botanical Garden.626 pp. doi:https://doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.44033

Staples, G, 2017. World Checklist of Convolvulaceae. Facilitated by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. http://wcsp.science.kew.org

Stefanović S, Austin DF, Olmstead RG, 2003. Classification of Convolvulaceae: A Phylogenetic Approach. Systematic Botany, 28(4), 791-806. https://doi.org/10.1043/02-45.1

Stevens PF, 2012. Angiosperm Phylogeny Website. http://www.mobot.org/MOBOT/research/APweb/

USDA-ARS, 2018. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Online Database. In: Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Online Database Beltsville, Maryland, USA: National Germplasm Resources Laboratory.https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxon/taxonomysimple.aspx

USDA-NRCS, 2018. The PLANTS Database. In: The PLANTS Database Greensboro, North Carolina, USA: National Plant Data Team.https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov

Vibrans, H., 2011. Weeds of Mexico. (Malezas de México). http://www.conabio.gob.mx/malezasdemexico/2inicio/home-malezas-mexico.htm

WCSP, 2020. World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. In: World Checklist of Selected Plant Families London, UK: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew.http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/home.do

World Flora Online, 2020. World Flora Online. In: World Flora Online : World Flora Online Consortium.http://www.worldfloraonline.org

Distribution References

Anon, 2016. Weeds On Line. (Plantas Daninhas On Line)., Brazil: Editora Agroverde. http://www.plantasdaninhasonline.com.br/

Broome R, Sabir K, Carrington S, 2007. Plants of the Eastern Caribbean. Online database. In: Plants of the Eastern Caribbean. Online database. Barbados: University of the West Indies. http://ecflora.cavehill.uwi.edu/index.html

CABI, 2020. CABI Distribution Database: Status as determined by CABI editor. Wallingford, UK: CABI

CABI, 2020a. CABI Distribution Database: Status inferred from regional distribution. Wallingford, UK: CABI

CABI, Undated. CABI Compendium: Status as determined by CABI editor. Wallingford, UK: CABI

Chacón E, Saborío G, 2012. Invasive species in Costa Rica. (Especies Invasoras en Costa Rica)., San José, Costa Rica: Asociación para la Conservación y el Estudio de la Biodiversidad. http://invasoras.acebio.org

Charles Darwin Foundation, 2008. Database inventory of introduced plant species in the rural and urban zones of Galapagos. In: Database inventory of introduced plant species in the rural and urban zones of Galapagos, Galapagos, Ecuador: Charles Darwin Foundation. unpaginated.

Chong K Y, Tan H T W, Corlett R T, 2009. A checklist of the total vascular plant flora of Singapore: native, naturalised and cultivated species. Singapore: Raffles Museum of Biodiversity Research, National University of Singapore. 273 pp. https://lkcnhm.nus.edu.sg/app/uploads/2017/04/flora_of_singapore_tc.pdf

Flora do Brasil, 2020. Brazilian flora 2020. In: Brazilian flora 2020, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Rio de Janeiro Botanic Garden. http://floradobrasil.jbrj.gov.br

Florence J, Chevillotte H, Ollier C, Meyer J-Y, 2013. Nadeaud botanical database of the Herbarium of French Polynesia. (Base de données botaniques Nadeaud de l'Herbier de la Polynésie Française (PAP))., https://nadeaud.ilm.pf/

GRIIS, 2017. Global Register of Introduced and Invasive Species., http://www.griis.org/

Herrera K, Lorence D H, Flynn T, Balick M J, 2010. Checklist of the Vascular Plants of Pohnpei, Federated States of Micronesia with Local Names and Uses. Allertonia. 1-192. https://www.jstor.org/stable/23193787

MacKee H S, 1994. Catalogue des plantes introduites et cultivées en Nouvelle-Calédonie. Paris, France: Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle. unpaginated.

Malaysia Biodiversity Information System, 2020. Malaysia Biodiversity Information System., Putrajaya, Malaysia: Ministry of Energy and Natural Resources. https://www.mybis.gov.my/

Más EG, Lugo-Torres ML, 2013. Common Weeds in Puerto Rico and U.S. Virgin Islands. (Malezas Comunes en Puerto Rico e Islas Vírgenes Americanas)., University of Puerto Rico and USDA Servicio de Conservación de Recursos Naturales, Área del Caribe/Caribbean Area. 395 pp. https://www.nrcs.usda.gov/wps/portal/nrcs/detail/plantmaterials/newsroom/feature/?cid=stelprdb1078250

Nayak S K, Satapathy K B, 2015. Diversity, uses and origin of invasive alien plants in Dhenkanal district of Odisha, India. International Research Journal of Biological Sciences. 4 (2), 21-27. http://www.isca.in/IJBS/Archive/v4/i2/4.ISCA-IRJBS-2014-223.pdf

Oviedo Prieto R, González-Oliva L, 2015. National list of invasive and potentially invasive plants in the Republic of Cuba - 2015. (Lista nacional de plantas invasoras y potencialmente invasoras en la República de Cuba - 2015). Bissea: Boletín sobre Conservación de Plantas del Jardín Botánico Nacional de Cuba. 9 (Special Issue No. 2), 1-88. http://repositorio.geotech.cu/jspui/bitstream/1234/1476/4/Lista%20nacional%20de%20plantas%20invasoras%20de%20Cuba-2015.pdf

PIER, 2018. Pacific Islands Ecosystems at Risk. In: Pacific Islands Ecosystems at Risk. Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: HEAR, University of Hawaii. http://www.hear.org/pier/index.html

POWO, 2020. Plants of the World Online. In: Plants of the World Online, London, UK: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. http://www.plantsoftheworldonline.org

Queensland Government, 2017. Weeds of Australia, Biosecurity Queensland Edition. In: Weeds of Australia, Biosecurity Queensland Edition. Australia: Queensland Government. http://keyserver.lucidcentral.org/weeds/data/media/Html/search.html

Seebens H, Blackburn T M, Dyer E E, Genovesi P, Hulme P E, Jeschke J M, Pagad S, Pyšek P, Winter M, Arianoutsou M, Bacher S, Blasius B, Brundu G, Capinha C, Celesti-Grapow L, Dawson W, Dullinger S, Fuentes N, Jäger H, Kartesz J, Kenis M, Kreft H, Kühn I, Lenzner B, Liebhold A, Mosena A (et al), 2017. No saturation in the accumulation of alien species worldwide. Nature Communications. 8 (2), 14435. http://www.nature.com/articles/ncomms14435

Sekar K C, Manikandan R, Srivastava S K, 2012. Invasive alien plants of Uttarakhand Himalaya. Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences India. Section B, Biological Sciences. 82 (3), 375-383. http://www.springerlink.com/content/p320x5877g574708/

Smith A C, 1991. Flora vitiensis nova. A new flora of Fiji, Vol. 5. Lawaii, Hawaii, USA: Pacific Tropical Botanical Garden. 626 pp. DOI:https://doi.org/10.5962/bhl.title.44033

Staples G, 2016. World Checklist of Convolvulaceae., London, UK: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/

Staples G, 2017. World Checklist of Convolvulaceae. Facilitated by the Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew., http://wcsp.science.kew.org

USDA-ARS, 2018. Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Online Database. In: Germplasm Resources Information Network (GRIN). Online Database. Beltsville, Maryland, USA: National Germplasm Resources Laboratory. https://npgsweb.ars-grin.gov/gringlobal/taxon/taxonomysimple.aspx

USDA-NRCS, 2018. The PLANTS Database. In: The PLANTS Database. Greensboro, North Carolina, USA: National Plant Data Team. https://plants.sc.egov.usda.gov

WCSP, 2020. World Checklist of Selected Plant Families. In: World Checklist of Selected Plant Families, London, UK: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/home.do

Links to Websites

Top of page
WebsiteURLComment
GISD/IASPMR: Invasive Alien Species Pathway Management Resource and DAISIE European Invasive Alien Species Gatewayhttps://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.m93f6Data source for updated system data added to species habitat list.
Global register of Introduced and Invasive species (GRIIS)http://griis.org/Data source for updated system data added to species habitat list.

Contributors

Top of page

22/01/18: Original text by:

Julissa Rojas-Sandoval, Department of Botany, Smithsonian NMNH, Washington, DC, USA

Distribution Maps

Top of page
You can pan and zoom the map
Save map
Select a dataset
Map Legends
  • CABI Summary Records
Map Filters
Extent
Invasive
Origin
Third party data sources: