Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Inonotus hispidus
(shaggy bracket)

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Datasheet

Inonotus hispidus (shaggy bracket)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 27 September 2018
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Pest
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Inonotus hispidus
  • Preferred Common Name
  • shaggy bracket
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Fungi
  •     Phylum: Basidiomycota
  •       Subphylum: Agaricomycotina
  •         Class: Agaricomycetes

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Annual basidiome of I. hispidus with the upper surface orange to rust and strongly tomentose.
TitleBasidiome
CaptionAnnual basidiome of I. hispidus with the upper surface orange to rust and strongly tomentose.
CopyrightFrancis W.M.R. Schwarze
Annual basidiome of I. hispidus with the upper surface orange to rust and strongly tomentose.
BasidiomeAnnual basidiome of I. hispidus with the upper surface orange to rust and strongly tomentose.Francis W.M.R. Schwarze
Transverse sample of London plane wood naturally infected by I. hispidus. Even at an advanced stage of decay the strongly lignified xylem ray resists degradation. The spread of decay is demarcated by a reaction zone (arrowed) with gum-like occlusions.
TitleSection of infected timber
CaptionTransverse sample of London plane wood naturally infected by I. hispidus. Even at an advanced stage of decay the strongly lignified xylem ray resists degradation. The spread of decay is demarcated by a reaction zone (arrowed) with gum-like occlusions.
CopyrightFrancis W.M.R. Schwarze
Transverse sample of London plane wood naturally infected by I. hispidus. Even at an advanced stage of decay the strongly lignified xylem ray resists degradation. The spread of decay is demarcated by a reaction zone (arrowed) with gum-like occlusions.
Section of infected timberTransverse sample of London plane wood naturally infected by I. hispidus. Even at an advanced stage of decay the strongly lignified xylem ray resists degradation. The spread of decay is demarcated by a reaction zone (arrowed) with gum-like occlusions.Francis W.M.R. Schwarze
Transverse section of London plane wood naturally infected with I. hispidus. Phenolic compounds area apparent within the lumina of axial parenchyma and adjacent fibre tracheids. Degradation of cell walls occurs only where hyphae have escaped nonconducive conditions within the lumina.
TitleSection of infected timber
CaptionTransverse section of London plane wood naturally infected with I. hispidus. Phenolic compounds area apparent within the lumina of axial parenchyma and adjacent fibre tracheids. Degradation of cell walls occurs only where hyphae have escaped nonconducive conditions within the lumina.
CopyrightFrancis W.M.R. Schwarze
Transverse section of London plane wood naturally infected with I. hispidus. Phenolic compounds area apparent within the lumina of axial parenchyma and adjacent fibre tracheids. Degradation of cell walls occurs only where hyphae have escaped nonconducive conditions within the lumina.
Section of infected timberTransverse section of London plane wood naturally infected with I. hispidus. Phenolic compounds area apparent within the lumina of axial parenchyma and adjacent fibre tracheids. Degradation of cell walls occurs only where hyphae have escaped nonconducive conditions within the lumina.Francis W.M.R. Schwarze

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Inonotus hispidus (Bull.) P. Karst.

Preferred Common Name

  • shaggy bracket

Other Scientific Names

  • Boletus hispidus Bull.
  • Boletus spongiosus Lightf.
  • Boletus velutinus Sowerby
  • Boletus villosus Huds.
  • Hemidiscia hispida (Bull.) Lázaro Ibiza
  • Inodermus hispidus (Bull.) Quél.
  • Inonotus hirsutus (Scop.) Murrill
  • Phaeoporus hispidus (Bull.) J. Schröt
  • Polyporus endocrocinus Berk.
  • Polyporus hispidus (Bull.) Fr.
  • Polystictus hispidus (Bull.) Gillot & Lucand
  • Xanthochrous hispidus (Bull.) Pat.

International Common Names

  • English: heart rot: ash; heart rot: walnut

Local Common Names

  • Germany: Rauhhaariger: Walnuss Porling; Zottiger Schillerporling

EPPO code

  • INONHI (Inonotus hispidus)

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Fungi
  •         Phylum: Basidiomycota
  •             Subphylum: Agaricomycotina
  •                 Class: Agaricomycetes
  •                     Subclass: Agaricomycetidae
  •                         Order: Hymenochaetales
  •                             Family: Hymenochaetaceae
  •                                 Genus: Inonotus
  •                                     Species: Inonotus hispidus

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Continent/Country/RegionDistributionLast ReportedOriginFirst ReportedInvasiveReferenceNotes

Asia

ChinaPresentNative Invasive Chi and Pan, 2001
IsraelPresentNative Not invasive Hershenzon and Jacquenoud, 1979
PakistanPresentNative Not invasive Khan and Bokhari, 1970

Africa

AlgeriaPresentKrimiz and Mehdid, 2001

North America

USAWidespreadNativeOverholts, 1953
-MississippiPresentMeadows et al., 2006
-North CarolinaPresentGrand and Vernia, 2005

Europe

AustriaWidespreadNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
FranceWidespreadNative Not invasive Plank and Wolkinger, 1977
GermanyWidespreadNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
ItalyPresentNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
LiechtensteinPresentNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
LuxembourgPresentNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
NetherlandsPresentNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
NorwayPresentNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
PolandPresentNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
PortugalPresentNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
Russian FederationPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-Central RussiaPresentNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
SlovakiaPresentNative Not invasive Gaper, 1997
SpainPresentNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
SwitzerlandWidespreadNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
UKWidespreadNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004
UkrainePresentNative Not invasive Schwarze et al., 2004

Habitat List

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CategorySub-CategoryHabitatPresenceStatus
Terrestrial
Terrestrial – ManagedManaged forests, plantations and orchards Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Urban / peri-urban areas Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Terrestrial ‑ Natural / Semi-naturalNatural forests Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)

Growth Stages

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List of Symptoms/Signs

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SignLife StagesType
Leaves / rot
Leaves / rot
Stems / canker on woody stem
Stems / canker on woody stem
Stems / dieback
Stems / dieback
Stems / discoloration
Stems / discoloration
Stems / discoloration of bark
Stems / discoloration of bark
Stems / gummosis or resinosis
Stems / gummosis or resinosis
Stems / necrosis
Stems / necrosis
Stems / ooze
Stems / ooze
Stems / rot
Stems / rot

Plant Trade

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Plant parts not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Bark
Bulbs/Tubers/Corms/Rhizomes
Flowers/Inflorescences/Cones/Calyx
Fruits (inc. pods)
Growing medium accompanying plants
Leaves
Roots
Seedlings/Micropropagated plants
Stems (above ground)/Shoots/Trunks/Branches
True seeds (inc. grain)
Wood

Wood Packaging

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Wood Packaging not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Loose wood packing material
Non-wood
Processed or treated wood
Solid wood packing material with bark
Solid wood packing material without bark

References

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Breitenbach J; Kränzlin F, 1986. Pilze der Schweiz, Bd. 2: Nichtblätterpilze. Mykologia, Luzern.

Burdekin DA, 1979. Common decay fungi in broadleaved trees. Arboric. Leafl. No. 5. London, UK: HMSO.

Butin H, 1996. Krankheiten der Wald- und Parkbäume. Diagnose - Biologie - Bekämpfung. 3. Aufl., Thieme, Stuttgart.

Campbell WG, 1931. The chemistry of white rots of wood. II. The effect on wood substance of Armillaria mellea (Vahl) Fr., Polyporus hispidus (Bull.) Fr. and Stereum hirsutum Fr. Biochemical Journal, 25:2023-2097.

Cartwright K-St.G, Findlay WPK, 1958. Decay of timber and its prevention. H.M. Stationery Office, London. 2nd ed. (rev.). pp. 332 + 57 plates. Many refs. Price £2. 7s. 6d. [Cf. F.A. 9 No. 2274].

Chi YuJie; Pan XueRen, 2001. Cultural characters of 10 polypore species growing on broad-leaf trees in forest reserves of Northeastern China. Mycosystema, 20(2):258-263; 7 ref.

Gaper J, 1997. A survey of the polypores occurring on introduced European and North American woody plants from the urban environment in Slovakia. Biologia Bratislava, 52:11-16.

Grand LF; Vernia CS, 2005. Biogeography and hosts of poroid wood decay fungi in North Carolina: species of Coltricia, Coltriciella and Inonotus. Mycotaxon, 91:35-38. http://www.mycotaxon.com

Hershenzon ZA; Jacquenoud M, 1979. Polypores in Israel. I. Mucronoporaceae. Israel Journal of Botany, 28(1):36-43

Khan AH; Bokhari AS, 1970. Damage due to fungus diseases in Bhagat Reservoir Plantation, Lyallpur Forest Division. Pakistan Journal of Forestry, 20(3):293-311. [3 refs.].

Killebrew JF; Arsdel EP van, 1970. Observations of Polyporus hispidus in East Texas. Abstr. in Phytopathology 60 (4), (584).

Kreisel H, 1961. Die Phytopathogenen Großpilze Deutschlands. Jena, Germany: G. Fischer.

Krimiz Z; Mehdid S, 2001. Identification of wood-decay fungi infecting various forest trees. Bulletin OEPP, 31:114-115.

Lonsdale D, 1999. Principles of tree hazard assessment and management. Principles of tree hazard assessment and management., 388 pp.; [^italic~Research for Amenity Trees^roman~ No. 7]; 213 ref.

Mattheck C; Schwarze FWMR, 1994. Wood rays as disguised I-bars within an alternative mechanical wood model. Allgemeine Forst- und Jagdzeitung, 165(10/11):197-201; [With English captions]; 10 ref.

McCracken FI, 1976. Isolations from hispidus cankers on willow oaks. 288]. Proceedings-of-the-American-Phytopathological-Society, publ. 1977, 3: 266.

McCracken FI, 1988. Microorganisms associated with canker rots and heart rot of oak. European Journal of Forest Pathology, 18:391-396.

Mccracken FI; Toole ER, 1969. Sporophore development and sporulation of Polyporus hispidus. Phytopathology 59 (6), (884-5). [5 refs.].

McCracken FI; Toole ER, 1974. Felling infected oaks in natural stands reduces dissemination of Polyporus hispidus spores. Phytopathology, 64(2):265-266; 2 diag.

Meadows JS; Leininger TD; Nebeker TE, 2002. Thinning to improve growth and control the canker decay fungus Inonotus hispidus in a red oak-sweetgum stand in the Mississippi delta. Outcalt KW, Outcalt PA, Tucker RB, eds. Proceedings of the 11th Biennial Southern Silvicultural Research Conference, Knoxville, Tennessee, Southern Research Station, USDA Forest Service, No.SRS-48, 183-188.

Meadows JS; Leininger TD; Nebeker TE, 2006. . http://www.srs.fs.usda.gov/pubs/gtr/gtr_srs092/gtr_srs092.pdf

Nuss I, 1986. Zur Ökologie der Porlinge II. Bibliotheca Mycologica, 105:1-300.

Nutman FJ, 1929. Studies of the wood destroying fungi. i. Polyporus hispidus (Fries). Annals of Applied Botany, 16:40-64.

Overholts LO, 1953. The Polyporaceae of the United States, Alaska and Canada. University of Michigan Press, Ann Arbor; Oxford University Press, London. 1953. pp. xiv + 466 + 132 photos. 238 refs. Price $7.50.

Pearce RB, 1991. Reaction zone relics and the dynamics of fungal spread in the xylem of woody angiosperms. Physiological and Molecular Plant Pathology, 39(1):41-55

Pegler DN; Waterston JM, 1968. Inonotus [Polyporus] hispidus. C. M. I. Descr. pathogen. Fungi Bact., Lond. No. 193, pp. [2]. [6 refs.].

Phillips DH; Burdekin DA, 1982. Diseases of forest and ornamental trees. Diseases of forest and ornamental trees. Macmillan Press Ltd. London UK, xv + 435 pp.

Plank S; Wolkinger F, 1977. Distribution of Inonotus hispidus in France and some border areas. Revue de Mycologie, 41(3):397-407

Schwarze FWMR; Baum S, 2000. Mechanisms of reaction zone penetration by decay fungi in wood of beech (Fagus sylvatica). New Phytologist, 146(1):129-140; 37 ref.

Schwarze FWMR; Engels J; Mattheck C, 2004. Fungal Strategies of Wood Decay in Trees. 2nd Ed. Heidelberg, Germany: Springer Verlag, 218 S.

Schwarze FWMR; Fink S, 1997. Reaction zone penetration and prolonged persistence of xylem rays in London plane wood degraded by the basidiomycete Inonotus hispidus. Mycological Research, 101(10):1207-1214; 34 ref.

Schwarze FWMR; Lonsdale D; Fink S, 1995. Soft rot and multiple T-branching by the basidiomycete Inonotus hispidus in ash and London plane. Mycological Research, 99(7):813-820

Schwarze FWMR; Lonsdale D; Fink S, 1997. An overview of wood degradation patterns and their implications for tree hazard assessment. Arboricultural Journal, 21(1):1-32; 5 pp. of ref.

Schwarze FWMR; Lonsdale D; Mattheck C, 1995. Detectability of wood decay caused by Ustulina deusta in comparison with other tree-decay fungi. European Journal of Forest Pathology, 25(6/7):327-341; 38 ref.

Seehann G, 1979. Holzzerstörende Pilze an Straßen- und Parkbäumen in Hamburg. Mitt. Dtsch. Dendrolog. Ges., 71:193-221.

Shigo AL; Marx HG, 1977. Compartmentalization of decay in trees. USDA Forest Service, Agricultural Information Bulletin, 405.

Sinclair WA; Lyon HH; Johnson WT, 1987. Diseases of trees and shrubs. Ithaca, New York, USA: Cornell University Press, 574 pp.

Spacek J, 1988. The degree of infestation of the walnut tree and the pear tree by wood-destroying basidiomycetes and frost-plates on the walnut tree and on the pear tree in different areas of Moravia and Silesia. Brno, Czechoslovakia; Univerzita J.E. Purkyne, 98 pp.

Wagner T; Fischer M, 2001. Natural groups and a revised system for the European poroid Hymenochaetales (Basidiomycota) supported by nLSU rDNA sequence data. Mycological Research, 105(7):773-782; 59 ref.

Distribution Maps

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