Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

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Eragrostis japonica
(pond lovegrass)

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Datasheet

Eragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 19 November 2018
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Invasive Species
  • Pest
  • Host Plant
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Eragrostis japonica
  • Preferred Common Name
  • pond lovegrass
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Plantae
  •     Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •       Subphylum: Angiospermae
  •         Class: Monocotyledonae
  • Summary of Invasiveness
  • E. japonica is a good fodder grass cultivated for pasture in tropical and subtropical regions (Kumar, 2013; ...

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Eragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass); panicle.
TitlePanicle
CaptionEragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass); panicle.
CopyrightPublic Domain - Released by Jose Hernandez, hosted by the USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database
Eragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass); panicle.
PanicleEragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass); panicle.Public Domain - Released by Jose Hernandez, hosted by the USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database
Eragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass); seeds.
TitleSeeds
CaptionEragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass); seeds.
CopyrightPublic Domain - Released by Jose Hernandez, hosted by the USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database
Eragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass); seeds.
SeedsEragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass); seeds.Public Domain - Released by Jose Hernandez, hosted by the USDA-NRCS PLANTS Database
Eragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass); a, Ligule, ventral view; b, young spikelet; c, mature spikelet; d, old spikelet breaking up from above; e, lower glume (G1), dorsal view; f, upper glume (G2) , dorsal view; g, lemma (L), dorsal view; h, floret; i-j, palea (P), two views; k, caryopsis, three views.
TitlePlant parts
CaptionEragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass); a, Ligule, ventral view; b, young spikelet; c, mature spikelet; d, old spikelet breaking up from above; e, lower glume (G1), dorsal view; f, upper glume (G2) , dorsal view; g, lemma (L), dorsal view; h, floret; i-j, palea (P), two views; k, caryopsis, three views.
Copyright©SEAMEO-BIOTROP
Eragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass); a, Ligule, ventral view; b, young spikelet; c, mature spikelet; d, old spikelet breaking up from above; e, lower glume (G1), dorsal view; f, upper glume (G2) , dorsal view; g, lemma (L), dorsal view; h, floret; i-j, palea (P), two views; k, caryopsis, three views.
Plant partsEragrostis japonica (pond lovegrass); a, Ligule, ventral view; b, young spikelet; c, mature spikelet; d, old spikelet breaking up from above; e, lower glume (G1), dorsal view; f, upper glume (G2) , dorsal view; g, lemma (L), dorsal view; h, floret; i-j, palea (P), two views; k, caryopsis, three views.©SEAMEO-BIOTROP

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Eragrostis japonica (Thunb.) Trin.

Preferred Common Name

  • pond lovegrass

Other Scientific Names

  • Airopsis jubata Griseb.
  • Diandrochloa diarrhena (Schult.) A.N.Henry
  • Diandrochloa diplachnoides (Steud.) A.N.Henry
  • Diandrochloa glomerata (Walter) Burkart
  • Diandrochloa japonica (Thunb.) A.N.Henry
  • Diandrochloa namaquensis (Nees) De Winter
  • Eragrostis aturensis (Kunth) Trin. ex Steud.
  • Eragrostis aurea Steud.
  • Eragrostis conferta (Elliott) Trin.
  • Eragrostis depauperata Andersson
  • Eragrostis diarrhena (Schult. and Schult.f.) Steud.
  • Eragrostis diplachnoides Steud.
  • Eragrostis elegans Nees
  • Eragrostis glomerata (Walter) Dewey ex Coult.
  • Eragrostis hapalantha Trin.
  • Eragrostis hochstetteri Steud.
  • Eragrostis koenigii (Kunth) Link
  • Eragrostis kossinskyi Roshev.
  • Eragrostis leprieurii Steud.
  • Eragrostis maritima A.Chev.
  • Eragrostis milleflora Steud.
  • Eragrostis mossulensis Steud.
  • Eragrostis namaquensis Nees
  • Eragrostis pallida Vasey
  • Eragrostis stricta (Roem. and Schult.) Steud.
  • Eragrostis volgensis Roshev.
  • Glyceria pilosa Steud.
  • Megastachya aturensis (Kunth) Roem. and Schult.
  • Megastachya glomerata (Walter) Schult.
  • Panicum leptanthum Steud.
  • Poa aturensis Kunth
  • Poa aurea (Steud.) Walp.
  • Poa biflora Retz.
  • Poa conferta Elliott
  • Poa diarrhena Schult. and Schult.f.
  • Poa glomerata Walter
  • Poa interrupta Lam.
  • Poa japonica Thunb.
  • Poa koenigii Kunth
  • Poa sporoboloides A.Rich.
  • Poa stricta Roth
  • Roshevitzia diarrhena (Schult. and Schult.f.) Tzvelev
  • Roshevitzia diplachnoides (Steud.) Tzvelev
  • Roshevitzia glomerata (Walter) Tzvelev
  • Roshevitzia japonica (Thunb.) Tzvelev
  • Sporobolus confertiflorus A.Rich.
  • Sporobolus verticillatus Nees
  • Vilfa confertiflora (A.Rich.) Steud.

International Common Names

  • English: Japanese lovegrass; teel lovegrass
  • French: pâturin de férat
  • Chinese: luan cao

Local Common Names

  • Brazil: ameixa-amarela; ameixeira; nêspera; nespereira
  • Japan: kogome-kaze-kusa
  • Malaysia: okwat; papalaan
  • Thailand: lokhwot; pee-pae
  • Vietnam: nhót tây; so'n trà nhatban'; ti ba diêp

EPPO code

  • ERAJA (Eragrostis japonica)

Summary of Invasiveness

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E. japonica is a good fodder grass cultivated for pasture in tropical and subtropical regions (Kumar, 2013; USDA-ARS, 2016). It has escaped from cultivation and naturalized principally in disturbed sites. This species behaves as a weed in abandoned pastures, cultivated land, disturbed sites, waste areas, and along roadsides and riparian areas (Barkworth et al., 2004; Flora of China Editorial Committee, 2016; PIER, 2016; PROTA, 2016). Currently, it is listed as invasive in Argentina, Brazil, and Cuba (Zuloaga et al., 2008; Oviedo Prieto et al., 2012; I3N-Brasil, 2016). It is well adapted to grow in seasonally waterlogged conditions and can be found growing in floodplain grassland and swampy grassland (Flora of Pakistan, 2016).

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Plantae
  •         Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •             Subphylum: Angiospermae
  •                 Class: Monocotyledonae
  •                     Order: Cyperales
  •                         Family: Poaceae
  •                             Genus: Eragrostis
  •                                 Species: Eragrostis japonica

Notes on Taxonomy and Nomenclature

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Eragrostis is the largest genus in the Chloridoideae, a well-supported monophyletic subfamily of the Poaceae. The subfamily Chloridoideae includes about 130 genera and 1721 grass species that tolerate drought and high saline conditions (Stevens, 2012). The large cosmopolitan genus Eragrostis is composed of approximately 350 species (Clayton et al., 2016). E. japonica belongs to a small group of closely allied species with membranous ligules which have been treated as a separate genus Diandrochloa. Judgement on this issue has been delayed until variation within the genus as a whole has been more closely studied (Flora of Pakistan, 2016).

Species within the genus Eragrostis are extremely polymorphic with three main sources of variation (Flora of Pakistan, 2016):

  1. Palea-keels: smooth palea-keels are confined to South and tropical Africa, while scaberulous keels are found throughout tropical Africa and Asia.

  2. Spikelet size: plants with few-flowered spikelets and lemmas less than 1 mm are generally separated as E. japonica sensu stricto, although similar forms from Africa with smooth palea-keels are called Eragrostis namaquensis, and those with rough keels are called Eragrostis diplachnoides.

  3. Panicle-form: three main sorts can be recognized: (a) interrupted with branches in pseudo whorls, almost exclusively Asian; (b) partly whorled but more generally open, branches branched from the base; and (c) branches solitary, bare at the base, panicle open.

Description

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E. japonica is an annual or short-lived perennial grass. Culms erect, or geniculate at base, 30–100 cm tall, 1.5–2.5 mm in diameter, 3–4-noded. Leaf sheaths usually loose, longer than internodes, glabrous; ligules scarious, approximately 0.5 mm, fimbriate at apex, pubescent on back; leaf blades flat, 3–25 × 0.3–0.5 cm, smooth and glabrous. Panicle elongated, 6–34 × 1.5–6 cm; branches slender, clustered or verticillate, glabrous in axils. Spikelets usually purplish at maturity, ovate, 1–2 mm, 4–8-flowered; rachilla distarticulating between florets from top downward at maturity. Glumes chartaceous, ovate-lanceolate, subequal, 0.6–0.8 mm, 1-veined, apex obtuse. Lemmas chartaceous, broadly elliptical, distinctly 3-veined, apex obtuse, lower lemma approximately 1 mm. Palea subequal to lemma, along 2 keels ciliolate. Stamens 2; anthers approximately 0.2 mm. Caryopsis red-brown, ovoid, 0.4–0.5 mm (Flora of China Editorial Committee, 2016; Flora of Pakistan, 2016).

Plant Type

Top of page Annual
Grass / sedge
Seed propagated

Distribution

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E. japonica is considered native to tropical and subtropical Africa and Asia, but the exact native range is still unclear (USDA-ARS, 2016). It has been widely introduced in tropical America and the West Indies (Zuloaga et al., 2008; Clayton et al., 2016).

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Continent/Country/RegionDistributionLast ReportedOriginFirst ReportedInvasiveReferenceNotes

Asia

BangladeshPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
BhutanPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
ChinaPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
-AnhuiPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
-FujianPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
-GuangdongPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
-GuangxiPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
-GuizhouPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
-HubeiPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
-JiangsuPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
-JiangxiPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
-YunnanPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
-ZhejiangPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
IndiaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
-Andaman and Nicobar IslandsPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
-AssamPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
-BiharPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-GujaratPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-Himachal PradeshPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-Indian PunjabPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-Jammu and KashmirPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-KarnatakaPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-KeralaPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-Madhya PradeshPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-MaharashtraPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-NagalandPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-OdishaPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-RajasthanPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-SikkimPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-Tamil NaduPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-Uttar PradeshPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
-West BengalPresentNativeIndia Biodiversity Portal, 2016
IndonesiaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
-JavaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
-MoluccasPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
-Nusa TenggaraPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
-SulawesiPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
-SumatraPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
IranPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
IraqPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
IsraelPresentIntroducedDAISIE, 2016
JapanPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
KazakhstanPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
Korea, DPRPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
Korea, Republic ofPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
LaosPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
LebanonPresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
MalaysiaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
MyanmarPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
NepalPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
OmanPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
PakistanPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
PalestinePresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
PhilippinesPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
Saudi ArabiaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
SingaporePresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
Sri LankaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
TaiwanPresentNativeFlora of China Editorial Committee, 2016
ThailandPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
VietnamPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
YemenPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016

Africa

AlgeriaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
AngolaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
BeninPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
BotswanaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
Burkina FasoPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
BurundiPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
CameroonPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
Central African RepublicPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
ChadPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
CongoPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
Congo Democratic RepublicPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
Côte d'IvoirePresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
EgyptPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
EritreaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
EthiopiaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
GambiaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
GhanaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
GuineaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
Guinea-BissauPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
KenyaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
MadagascarPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
MalawiPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
MaliPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
MauritaniaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
MozambiquePresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
NamibiaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
NigerPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
NigeriaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
SenegalPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
Sierra LeonePresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
SomaliaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
South AfricaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
SudanPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
SwazilandPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
TanzaniaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
TogoPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
UgandaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
ZambiaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
ZimbabwePresentNativeClayton et al., 2016

North America

MexicoPresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
USAPresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016
-AlabamaPresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016Naturalized
-ArkansasPresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016Naturalized
-FloridaPresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016Naturalized
-GeorgiaPresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016Naturalized
-IllinoisPresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016Naturalized
-LouisianaPresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016Naturalized
-MississippiPresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016Naturalized
-MissouriPresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016Naturalized
-OklahomaPresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016Naturalized
-South CarolinaPresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016Naturalized
-TennesseePresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016Naturalized
-TexasPresentIntroducedUSDA-NRCS, 2016Naturalized

Central America and Caribbean

BarbadosPresentIntroducedAcevedo-Rodríguez and Strong, 2012
Costa RicaPresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
CubaPresentIntroduced Invasive Oviedo Prieto et al., 2012
El SalvadorPresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
GuatemalaPresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
HondurasPresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
NicaraguaPresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
Trinidad and TobagoPresentIntroducedAcevedo-Rodríguez and Strong, 2012Trinidad

South America

ArgentinaPresentIntroduced Invasive Zuloaga et al., 2008Buenos Aires, Chaco, Corrientes, Distrito Federal, Entre Rios, Formosa, Jujuy, Misiones, Salta, Tucuman
BoliviaPresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
BrazilPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016
-AmapaPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-AmazonasPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-BahiaPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-CearaPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-Espirito SantoPresentIntroduced Invasive I3N-Brasil, 2016
-GoiasPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-MaranhaoPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-Mato GrossoPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-Mato Grosso do SulPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-Minas GeraisPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-ParaPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-ParaibaPresentIntroduced Invasive I3N-Brasil, 2016
-PernambucoPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-Rio Grande do NortePresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-Rio Grande do SulPresentIntroduced Invasive I3N-Brasil, 2016
-RoraimaPresentIntroducedLonghi-Wagner, 2016Naturalized
-Santa CatarinaPresentIntroduced Invasive I3N-Brasil, 2016
-Sao PauloPresentIntroduced Invasive I3N-Brasil, 2016
ColombiaPresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
EcuadorPresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
GuyanaPresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
ParaguayPresentIntroducedZuloaga et al., 2008Naturalized in Alta Parana, Alto Paraguay, Concepcion, Nembucu, San Pedro
PeruPresentIntroducedClayton et al., 2016
UruguayPresentIntroducedZuloaga et al., 2008Naturalized in Artigas, Paysandu, Rio Negro, Salto

Europe

Russian FederationPresentClayton et al., 2016

Oceania

Papua New GuineaPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016
Solomon IslandsPresentNativeClayton et al., 2016

History of Introduction and Spread

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E. japonica has been introduced in tropical and subtropical areas to be used as a pasture grass, however the dates of introduction and precise introduced vs. native range are unclear.

Risk of Introduction

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The risk of introduction of E.japonica is moderate to high. The success of this grass species can be attributed to its broad habitat adaptation which enables the species to grow as a weed and persist even under unfavourable conditions.

Habitat

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E. japonica grows in damp places and along riverbanks. It is a weed in cultivated land (Sreekumar and Nair, 1991; Kabeer and Nair, 2009). In the United States and South America, it grows on sandy soils at elevations from sea level to 200 m (Lægaard and Peterson, 2001; Barkworth et al., 2004).

Habitat List

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CategorySub-CategoryHabitatPresenceStatus
Terrestrial
 
Terrestrial – ManagedCultivated / agricultural land Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Managed grasslands (grazing systems) Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Managed grasslands (grazing systems) Present, no further details Natural
Managed grasslands (grazing systems) Present, no further details Productive/non-natural
Disturbed areas Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Disturbed areas Present, no further details Natural
Disturbed areas Present, no further details Productive/non-natural
Terrestrial ‑ Natural / Semi-naturalNatural grasslands Present, no further details Harmful (pest or invasive)
Natural grasslands Present, no further details Natural
Natural grasslands Present, no further details Productive/non-natural

Host Plants and Other Plants Affected

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Plant nameFamilyContext
Glycine max (soyabean)FabaceaeMain

Biology and Ecology

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Genetics

The chromosome number reported for E. japonica is 2n = 20 (Bir and Sahni, 1988).

Physiology and Phenology

In China, E. japonica produces flowers and fruits from June to November (Flora of China Editorial Committee, 2016). In Pakistan it has been recorded flowering and fruiting from August-October to December (Flora of Pakistan, 2016).

Longevity

E. japonica is an annual or short-lived perennial grass. It competes aggressively in disturbed sites and on sandy soils (Barkworth et al., 2004; Flora of Pakistan, 2016).

Climate

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ClimateStatusDescriptionRemark
Af - Tropical rainforest climate Preferred > 60mm precipitation per month
Am - Tropical monsoon climate Preferred Tropical monsoon climate ( < 60mm precipitation driest month but > (100 - [total annual precipitation(mm}/25]))
As - Tropical savanna climate with dry summer Preferred < 60mm precipitation driest month (in summer) and < (100 - [total annual precipitation{mm}/25])
Aw - Tropical wet and dry savanna climate Preferred < 60mm precipitation driest month (in winter) and < (100 - [total annual precipitation{mm}/25])

Soil Tolerances

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Soil drainage

  • seasonally waterlogged

Soil reaction

  • acid
  • neutral

Soil texture

  • light

Means of Movement and Dispersal

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E. japonica spreads by seeds, which can be dispersed by wind, water, as a contaminant and adhered to livestock and motor vehicles (Barkworth et al., 2004; Flora of Pakistan, 2016; PROTA, 2016).

Pathway Causes

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CauseNotesLong DistanceLocalReferences
DisturbanceGrows along roadsides and disturbed sites Yes Yes Barkworth et al., 2004
ForageUse for pasture, forage, fodder Yes Yes USDA-ARS, 2016

Pathway Vectors

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VectorNotesLong DistanceLocalReferences
Debris and waste associated with human activitiesSeeds spread readily into disturbed areas from cultivated areas Yes Yes PROTA, 2016
WindSeeds dispersed by wind Yes Yes PIER, 2016

Impact Summary

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CategoryImpact
Economic/livelihood Positive and negative
Environment (generally) Positive and negative

Environmental Impact

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E. japonica is a weedy grass impacting principally agricultural lands and disturbed sites. It is also a weed in natural grasslands and riparian areas (Barkworth et al., 2004; Flora of China Editorial Committee, 2016; PIER, 2016; PROTA, 2016). Once naturalized, this species has the capability to outcompete native vegetation and alter successional patterns (Barkworth et al., 2004; Flora of Pakistan, 2016).

Risk and Impact Factors

Top of page Invasiveness
  • Proved invasive outside its native range
  • Has a broad native range
  • Abundant in its native range
  • Highly adaptable to different environments
  • Is a habitat generalist
  • Tolerates, or benefits from, cultivation, browsing pressure, mutilation, fire etc
  • Pioneering in disturbed areas
  • Highly mobile locally
  • Benefits from human association (i.e. it is a human commensal)
  • Fast growing
  • Gregarious
Impact outcomes
  • Ecosystem change/ habitat alteration
  • Modification of successional patterns
  • Monoculture formation
  • Negatively impacts agriculture
  • Reduced native biodiversity
  • Threat to/ loss of native species
Impact mechanisms
  • Competition - monopolizing resources
  • Herbivory/grazing/browsing
  • Rapid growth
Likelihood of entry/control
  • Highly likely to be transported internationally accidentally
  • Difficult to identify/detect as a commodity contaminant
  • Difficult to identify/detect in the field

Uses

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E. japonica is a fodder grass and mostly grazed by cattle (Kabeer and Nair, 2009). It is also used as a lactation stimulant in animals. It is considered to be a good fodder for buffaloes in parts of India and Pakistan (Flora of Pakistan, 2016).

Uses List

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Animal feed, fodder, forage

  • Fodder/animal feed
  • Forage

Environmental

  • Agroforestry

Prevention and Control

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The herbicides recommended for chemical control of E. japonica include post-emergence applications of 2, 4-D and pre-emergence applications of herbicides such as butachlor, anilophos and pretilachlor (Radanachaless and Maxwell, 1994).

References

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Acevedo-Rodríguez P, Strong MT, 2012. Catalogue of the Seed Plants of the West Indies. Smithsonian Contributions to Botany, 98:1192 pp. Washington DC, USA: Smithsonian Institution. http://botany.si.edu/Antilles/WestIndies/catalog.htm

Barkworth ME, Capels KM, Long S, Piep MB, 2004. Eragrostis. Flora of North America, volume 25. http://herbarium.usu.edu/webmanual/

Bir SS, Sahni M, 1988. Cytomorphological studies on members of genus Eragrostis from Punjab Plain (north India). , Journal of Cytology and Genetics, 23:118-131

Clayton WD, Govaerts R, Harman KT, Williamson H, Vorontsova M, 2016. World Checklist of Poaceae. Richmond, UK: Royal Botanic Gardens, Kew. http://apps.kew.org/wcsp/

DAISIE, 2016. Delivering Alien Invasive Species Inventories for Europe. European Invasive Alien Species Gateway. www.europe-aliens.org/default.do

Flora of China Editorial Committee, 2016. Flora of China. St. Louis, Missouri and Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA: Missouri Botanical Garden and Harvard University Herbaria. http://www.efloras.org/flora_page.aspx?flora_id=2

Flora of Pakistan, 2016. Flora of Pakistan/Pakistan Plant Database (PPD). St. Louis, Missouri and Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA: Tropicos website. http://www.tropicos.org/Project/Pakistan

I3N-Brasil, 2016. National database of exotic invasive species (Base de dados nacional de especies exoticas invasora). Santa Catarina, Brazil: Instituto Horus de Dsenvolvimento e Conservacao Ambiental. http://i3n.institutohorus.org.br

India Biodiversity Portal, 2016. Online Portal of India Biodiversity. http://indiabiodiversity.org/species/list

Kabeer KAA, Nair VJ, 2009. Flora of Tamil Nadu - Grasses. Kolkatta, India: Botanical Survey of India.

Kumar B, 2013. Eragrostis japonica. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2013: e.T177051A7369942. http://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2011-1.RLTS.T177051A7369942.en

Longhi-Wagner HM, 2016. Eragrostis in Lista de Espécies da Flora do Brasil. Rio de Janeiro, Brazil: Jardim Botânico do Rio de Janeiro. http://floradobrasil.jbrj.gov.br/jabot/floradobrasil/FB13206

Lægaard S, Peterson PM, 2001. Gramineae (part 2) Subfamily Chloridoideae. In: Gunnar H, Anderson L, Eds. Flora of Ecuador, 68 pp.

Oviedo Prieto R, Herrera Oliver P, Caluff MG, et al. , 2012. National list of invasive and potentially invasive plants in the Republic of Cuba - 2011. (Lista nacional de especies de plantas invasoras y potencialmente invasoras en la República de Cuba - 2011). Bissea: Boletín sobre Conservación de Plantas del Jardín Botánico Nacional de Cuba, 6(Special Issue 1):22-96.

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Links to Websites

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WebsiteURLComment
GISD/IASPMR: Invasive Alien Species Pathway Management Resource and DAISIE European Invasive Alien Species Gatewayhttps://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.m93f6Data source for updated system data added to species habitat list.

Contributors

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19/05/16 Original text by:

Julissa Rojas-Sandoval, Department of Botany-Smithsonian NMNH, Washington DC, USA

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