Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

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Elm mottle virus

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Datasheet

Elm mottle virus

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 14 July 2018
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Invasive Species
  • Pest
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Elm mottle virus
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Virus
  •   Unknown: "Positive sense ssRNA viruses"
  •     Unknown: "RNA viruses"
  •       Family: Bromoviridae
  •         Genus: Ilarvirus

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Chlorotic ringspot and line pattern symptoms in leaves of Ulmus glabra infected with EMoV.
TitleSymptoms
CaptionChlorotic ringspot and line pattern symptoms in leaves of Ulmus glabra infected with EMoV.
CopyrightA.T. Jones/Scottish Crop Research Institute
Chlorotic ringspot and line pattern symptoms in leaves of Ulmus glabra infected with EMoV.
SymptomsChlorotic ringspot and line pattern symptoms in leaves of Ulmus glabra infected with EMoV.A.T. Jones/Scottish Crop Research Institute
Chlorotic ringspot and line pattern symptoms in leaves of Ulmus glabra infected with EMoV.
TitleSymptoms
CaptionChlorotic ringspot and line pattern symptoms in leaves of Ulmus glabra infected with EMoV.
CopyrightA.T. Jones/Scottish Crop Research Institute
Chlorotic ringspot and line pattern symptoms in leaves of Ulmus glabra infected with EMoV.
SymptomsChlorotic ringspot and line pattern symptoms in leaves of Ulmus glabra infected with EMoV.A.T. Jones/Scottish Crop Research Institute
Systemic chlorotic mottle induced by EMoV in a leaf of Chenopodium quinoa.
TitleSymptoms
CaptionSystemic chlorotic mottle induced by EMoV in a leaf of Chenopodium quinoa.
CopyrightA.T. Jones/Scottish Crop Research Institute
Systemic chlorotic mottle induced by EMoV in a leaf of Chenopodium quinoa.
SymptomsSystemic chlorotic mottle induced by EMoV in a leaf of Chenopodium quinoa.A.T. Jones/Scottish Crop Research Institute
Necrotic local lesions induced by EMoV in a leaf of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. The Prince.
TitleSymptoms
CaptionNecrotic local lesions induced by EMoV in a leaf of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. The Prince.
CopyrightA.T. Jones/Scottish Crop Research Institute
Necrotic local lesions induced by EMoV in a leaf of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. The Prince.
SymptomsNecrotic local lesions induced by EMoV in a leaf of Phaseolus vulgaris cv. The Prince.A.T. Jones/Scottish Crop Research Institute
Electron micrograph of a preparation of purified particles of EMoV in uranyl formate.
TitleSEM
CaptionElectron micrograph of a preparation of purified particles of EMoV in uranyl formate.
CopyrightA.T. Jones/Scottish Crop Research Institute
Electron micrograph of a preparation of purified particles of EMoV in uranyl formate.
SEMElectron micrograph of a preparation of purified particles of EMoV in uranyl formate.A.T. Jones/Scottish Crop Research Institute

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Elm mottle virus

Other Scientific Names

  • Elm mottle ilarvirus
  • Hydrangea mosaic virus
  • Lilac white mosaic virus

EPPO code

  • EMOV00 (Elm mottle ilarvirus)

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Virus
  •     Unknown: "Positive sense ssRNA viruses"
  •         Unknown: "RNA viruses"
  •             Family: Bromoviridae
  •                 Genus: Ilarvirus
  •                     Species: Elm mottle virus

Notes on Taxonomy and Nomenclature

Top of page Elm mottle virus (EMoV) is serologically indistinguishable from Hydrangea mosaic virus (Jones, 1985a; Scott, 2001) and is serologically related to Asparagus virus 2, Citrus leaf rugose, Citrus variegation and Tulare apple mosaic viruses (Uyeda and Mink, 1983). These five viruses, together with Spinach latent virus, have been placed in Subgroup 2 of the genus Ilarvirus in the family Bromoviridae (Roosinck et al., 2000).

Description

Top of page EMoV has quasi-spherical particles that vary in diameter from ca 24-32 nm (see Pictures) and that sediment as three nucleoprotein components with sedimentation coefficients of 83, 88 and 101S. Particles are disrupted in 2% sodium phosphotungstate but are quasi-spherical in uranyl format and particles are not penetrated by the stain (see Pictures). Purified particle preparations form two bands in caesium chloride solution with buoyant densities of 1.27 and 1.34g/cm³, but only material in the denser band was infective. Purified virus particle preparations contain a major polypeptide of 25 kDa and 5 ssRNA species of ca. 1.3, 1.15, 0.82, 0.39 and 0.3 x 10<(sup)6> (Jones and Mayo, 1974; Jones, 1974).

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Continent/Country/RegionDistributionLast ReportedOriginFirst ReportedInvasiveReferenceNotes

Europe

BulgariaPresentIntroduced Not invasive Schmelzer et al., 1966; CABI/EPPO, 2004; EPPO, 2014
CroatiaPresentIntroduced Not invasive Plese and Juretic, 1999; CABI/EPPO, 2004; EPPO, 2014
Czech RepublicPresentCABI/EPPO, 2004; EPPO, 2014
Czechoslovakia (former)PresentIntroduced Not invasive Schmelzer et al., 1966; CABI/EPPO, 2004
GermanyWidespreadNative Invasive Schmelzer, 1974; CABI/EPPO, 2004; EPPO, 2014
Russian FederationPresentIntroduced Not invasive Schmelzer et al., 1966; CABI/EPPO, 2004; EPPO, 2014
SlovakiaPresentCABI/EPPO, 2004; EPPO, 2014
UKWidespreadNative Invasive Jones, 1974; Thomas et al., 1983; CABI/EPPO, 2004; EPPO, 2014

Hosts/Species Affected

Top of page EMoV causes chlorotic mosaic and ringspot symptoms in leaves of Syringa vulgaris, Hydrangea macrophylla and Forsythia intermedia (Schmelzer, 1969; Thomas et al., 1983) and is associated with chlorotic mottling and line-pattern symptoms in elm (see Pictures) (Schmelzer, 1969; Jones, 1974).

Growth Stages

Top of page Flowering stage, Fruiting stage, Post-harvest, Pre-emergence, Seedling stage, Vegetative growing stage

List of Symptoms/Signs

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SignLife StagesType
Leaves / abnormal patterns

Means of Movement and Dispersal

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Vector Transmission

EMoV has no known vector. However, another Ilarvirus (Tobacco streak virus) is transmitted by thrips which damage the leaves when feeding and so allow the entry into plants of viruliferous pollen. As EMoV has been detected in pollen of one natural host (lilac), the virus may be similarly transmitted.

Seed Transmission

EMoV is transmitted in seeds of infected elm (Jones and Mayo, 1973). The possibility of seed transmission in other hosts has not been tested adequately.

Seedborne Aspects

Top of page EMoV is present in the pollen of lilac and, in tests, the virus was transmitted through the seeds of infected elm (Jones and Mayo, 1973).

Plant Trade

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Plant parts liable to carry the pest in trade/transportPest stagesBorne internallyBorne externallyVisibility of pest or symptoms
Flowers/Inflorescences/Cones/Calyx Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Fruits (inc. pods) Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Leaves Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Roots Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Seedlings/Micropropagated plants Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Stems (above ground)/Shoots/Trunks/Branches Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
True seeds (inc. grain) Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Plant parts not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Bark
Growing medium accompanying plants
Wood

Wood Packaging

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Wood Packaging not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Loose wood packing material
Non-wood
Processed or treated wood
Solid wood packing material with bark
Solid wood packing material without bark

Diagnosis

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EMoV is transmitted mechanically in sap to herbaceous test plants. Chenopodium quinoa is the most sensitive test species, leaves of which develop a faint systemic mosaic followed by mottling 7-10 days after inoculation (see Pictures). Necrotic local lesions develop in Phaseolus vulgaris (see Pictures) and Vigna unguiculata. Several other test species, including those of Nicotiana are infected systemically but develop no symptoms (Jones and Mayo, 1973).

The virus is readily detected serologically in plants using ELISA and other serological methods (Uyeda and Mink, 1983).

Similarities to Other Species/Conditions

Top of page EMoV is distinct from Elm mosaic virus, a strain of Cherry leaf roll virus (Jones, 1985b) which is found in North America. The two viruses are not related serologically, belong to different virus families, and differ in particle properties, experimental host range and symptomatology (Jones, 1974). EMoV is serologically related to other members of Subgroup 2 of Ilarviruses (Roosinck et al., 2000). In particle properties and composition the virus resembles species in the other subgroups of the genus Ilarvirus but is distinguished from them serologically (Jones, 1974; Roosinck et al., 2000). However, sequence comparisons of the virus coat protein genes has shown that EMoV, Apple mosaic virus, Lilac ring mottle virus and Prunus necrotic ringspot virus are most closely related to Prune dwarf virus (Vaskova et al., 2000).

Prevention and Control

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Due to the variable regulations around (de)registration of pesticides, your national list of registered pesticides or relevant authority should be consulted to determine which products are legally allowed for use in your country when considering chemical control. Pesticides should always be used in a lawful manner, consistent with the product's label.

As EMoV is possibly transmitted between plants through infected pollen and is seedborne, effective control is best achieved by planting virus-tested material away from likely sources of infection.

References

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CABI/EPPO, 2004. Elm mottle virus. Distribution Maps of Plant Diseases, No. 927. Wallingford, UK: CAB International.

EPPO, 2014. PQR database. Paris, France: European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization. http://www.eppo.int/DATABASES/pqr/pqr.htm

Jones AT, 1974. Elm mottle virus. CMI/AAB Descriptions of Plant Viruses No.139. Wellesbourne, UK: Association of Applied Biologists, 4 pp.

Jones AT, 1985. Cherry leaf roll virus. AAB Descriptions of Plant Viruses No. 306. Wellesbourne, UK: Association of Applied Biologists. 6 pp.

Jones AT, 1985. Serological relationship between hydrangea mosaic and elm mottle (EmotV) viruses. Report of the Scottish Crop Research Institute for 1984, Dundee, UK, 187-191.

Jones AT; Mayo MA, 1973. Purification and properties of elm mottle virus. Annals of Applied Biology, 75:347-357.

Plese N; Juretic N, 1999. Virusna bolest poljskog brijesta (Ulmus minor Mill.) u Hrvatskoj. Sumarski List, 123(3-4):95-100.

Roosinck MJ; Bujarski J; Ding SW; Hajimorad R; Hanada R; Scott S; Tousignant M, 2000. Family Bromoviridae. In: Van Regenmortel MHV, Fauquet CM, Bishop DHL, Carstens E, Estes M, Lemon S, Maniloff J, Mayo MA, McGeoch D, Pringle CR, Wickner RB, eds. Virus Taxonomy. Seventh Report of the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses. New York, USA: Academic Press, 931-935.

Schmelzer K, 1969. Das Ulmenscheckungs-Virus. Phytopathologische Zeitschrift, 64:39-67.

Schmelzer K, 1974. Untersuchungen an Viren der Zier- und Wildegeholze. 8. Mitteilung Neue Befunde an Forsythia, Hydrangea und Philadelphus sowie Viren und Virosen an Rhamnus, Centaurea, Galvezia, Cistus, Forestiera, Abeliophyllum, Celastrus, Staphylea und Crambe. Zentralblatt fnr Bakteriologie, Parasitenkunde Infektionskrankheiten und Hygiene, II, 129:139-168.

Schmelzer K; Schmidt HE, 1966. Die Viruskrankheiten des Flieders. Archiv Gartenbau, 14:303-314.

Schmelzer K; Schmidt HE; Schmidt HB, 1966. Viruskrankheiten und virusverdachtige Erscheinungen an Forstgeholzen. Archiv fnr Forstwesen, 15:107-120.

Scott S, 2001. Tobacco streak virus. AAB Descriptions of Plant Viruses No. 381. Wellesbourne, UK: Association of Applied Biologists.

Thomas BJ; Barton RJ; Tuszynski A, 1983. Hydrangea mosaic virus, a new ilarvirus from Hydrangea macrophylla (Saxifragaceae). Annals of Applied Biology, 103(2):261-270

Uyeda I; Mink GI, 1983. Relationships among some ilarviruses: proposed revision of subgroup A. Phytopathology, 73(1):47-50

Vaskova D; Petrzik K; Spak J, 2000. Molecular variability of the capsid protein of the prune dwarf virus. European Journal of Plant Pathology, 106(6):573-580.

Distribution Maps

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