Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Abies grandis
(grand fir)

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Datasheet

Abies grandis (grand fir)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 20 November 2019
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Host Plant
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Abies grandis
  • Preferred Common Name
  • grand fir
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Plantae
  •     Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •       Subphylum: Gymnospermae
  •         Class: Pinopsida
  • Uses List
  • Agroforestry
  • Fibre
  • Ornamental
  • Religious
  • Wood/timber

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
A. grandis has excellent self-pruning qualities. Notice the thin bark and low taper - together with narrow crowns, all these features contribute to the high productivity of the species.
TitleMature trees
CaptionA. grandis has excellent self-pruning qualities. Notice the thin bark and low taper - together with narrow crowns, all these features contribute to the high productivity of the species.
CopyrightK. Klinka
A. grandis has excellent self-pruning qualities. Notice the thin bark and low taper - together with narrow crowns, all these features contribute to the high productivity of the species.
Mature treesA. grandis has excellent self-pruning qualities. Notice the thin bark and low taper - together with narrow crowns, all these features contribute to the high productivity of the species.K. Klinka
Planting A. grandis on sites where it is exposure-tolerant is usually successful; however, on warm, and water-deficient sites, a temporary protection by hardwood nurse-trees, such as Alnus rubra, improves survival of the planted seedlings.
TitleYoung tree
CaptionPlanting A. grandis on sites where it is exposure-tolerant is usually successful; however, on warm, and water-deficient sites, a temporary protection by hardwood nurse-trees, such as Alnus rubra, improves survival of the planted seedlings.
CopyrightK. Klinka
Planting A. grandis on sites where it is exposure-tolerant is usually successful; however, on warm, and water-deficient sites, a temporary protection by hardwood nurse-trees, such as Alnus rubra, improves survival of the planted seedlings.
Young treePlanting A. grandis on sites where it is exposure-tolerant is usually successful; however, on warm, and water-deficient sites, a temporary protection by hardwood nurse-trees, such as Alnus rubra, improves survival of the planted seedlings.K. Klinka
As a moderately shade-tolerant tree, A. grandis may regenerate in intermediate light conditions on shallow and friable forest floors or exposed mineral soil. Such conditions usually occur in the understorey of hardwood stands.
TitleRegeneration
CaptionAs a moderately shade-tolerant tree, A. grandis may regenerate in intermediate light conditions on shallow and friable forest floors or exposed mineral soil. Such conditions usually occur in the understorey of hardwood stands.
CopyrightK. Klinka
As a moderately shade-tolerant tree, A. grandis may regenerate in intermediate light conditions on shallow and friable forest floors or exposed mineral soil. Such conditions usually occur in the understorey of hardwood stands.
RegenerationAs a moderately shade-tolerant tree, A. grandis may regenerate in intermediate light conditions on shallow and friable forest floors or exposed mineral soil. Such conditions usually occur in the understorey of hardwood stands.K. Klinka
A mature cone of A. amabilis in September about to shed scales and release seed. The resin that can be seen is a reaction to insect attack.
TitleCone
CaptionA mature cone of A. amabilis in September about to shed scales and release seed. The resin that can be seen is a reaction to insect attack.
CopyrightJ. Worrall
A mature cone of A. amabilis in September about to shed scales and release seed. The resin that can be seen is a reaction to insect attack.
ConeA mature cone of A. amabilis in September about to shed scales and release seed. The resin that can be seen is a reaction to insect attack.J. Worrall

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Abies grandis (Douglas ex D. Don) Lindl.

Preferred Common Name

  • grand fir

Other Scientific Names

  • Abies excelsior Franco
  • Abies gordoniana Carr.
  • Picea grandis Douglas ex Loudon
  • Pinus grandis Douglas ex D. Don

International Common Names

  • English: giant fir; lowland fir; lowland white fir; silver fir; white fir; yellow fir
  • Spanish: abeto grande
  • French: sapin de Vancouver; sapin geant

Local Common Names

  • : giant fir; lowland balsam fir; lowland fir; silver fir; stinking fir; white fir; yellow fir
  • Germany: Grossetanne; Riesentanne
  • Italy: abete di Vancouver
  • Netherlands: groote spar; reuzenzilverspar
  • Sweden: kustgran

EPPO code

  • ABIGR (Abies grandis)

Trade name

  • mixed species
  • mountain hemlock - hem-fir
  • western woods
  • white woods

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Plantae
  •         Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •             Subphylum: Gymnospermae
  •                 Class: Pinopsida
  •                     Family: Pinaceae
  •                         Genus: Abies
  •                             Species: Abies grandis

Uses List

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Drugs, stimulants, social uses

  • Religious

Environmental

  • Agroforestry

General

  • Ornamental

Materials

  • Fibre
  • Wood/timber

Wood Products

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Containers

  • Boxes
  • Crates
  • Pallets

Pulp

  • Short-fibre pulp

Sawn or hewn building timbers

  • For light construction

Veneers

Wood-based materials

  • Fibreboard
  • Particleboard
  • Plywood

Woodware

  • Industrial and domestic woodware