Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Cnephasia longana
(omnivorous leaf-tier)

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Datasheet

Cnephasia longana (omnivorous leaf-tier)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 03 January 2018
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Pest
  • Natural Enemy
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Cnephasia longana
  • Preferred Common Name
  • omnivorous leaf-tier
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Metazoa
  •     Phylum: Arthropoda
  •       Subphylum: Uniramia
  •         Class: Insecta

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Adult moth, set specimen. Forewings very variable, from pale cream to greyish-brown, markings at times obsolete, sometimes strongly patterned with an irregular chevron-like fascia of greyish brown and further markings basally and in apical area.
TitleAdult
CaptionAdult moth, set specimen. Forewings very variable, from pale cream to greyish-brown, markings at times obsolete, sometimes strongly patterned with an irregular chevron-like fascia of greyish brown and further markings basally and in apical area.
Copyright©David Agassiz
Adult moth, set specimen. Forewings very variable, from pale cream to greyish-brown, markings at times obsolete, sometimes strongly patterned with an irregular chevron-like fascia of greyish brown and further markings basally and in apical area.
AdultAdult moth, set specimen. Forewings very variable, from pale cream to greyish-brown, markings at times obsolete, sometimes strongly patterned with an irregular chevron-like fascia of greyish brown and further markings basally and in apical area.©David Agassiz
Adult moth, set specimen. Wingspan 15-22 mm, females slightly larger than males.
TitleAdult
CaptionAdult moth, set specimen. Wingspan 15-22 mm, females slightly larger than males.
Copyright©David Agassiz
Adult moth, set specimen. Wingspan 15-22 mm, females slightly larger than males.
AdultAdult moth, set specimen. Wingspan 15-22 mm, females slightly larger than males.©David Agassiz

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Cnephasia longana (Haworth)

Preferred Common Name

  • omnivorous leaf-tier

Other Scientific Names

  • Tortrix longana Haworth

International Common Names

  • English: ear leafroller; leaftier, omnivorous; omnivorous leafroller; strawberry, fruitworm
  • French: lieuse omnivore

EPPO code

  • CNEPLO (Cnephasia longana)

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Metazoa
  •         Phylum: Arthropoda
  •             Subphylum: Uniramia
  •                 Class: Insecta
  •                     Order: Lepidoptera
  •                         Family: Tortricidae
  •                             Genus: Cnephasia
  •                                 Species: Cnephasia longana

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Growth Stages

Top of page Flowering stage, Fruiting stage, Vegetative growing stage

List of Symptoms/Signs

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SignLife StagesType
Fruit / internal feeding
Growing point / internal feeding; boring
Inflorescence / internal feeding
Leaves / internal feeding
Leaves / leaves rolled or folded
Stems / internal feeding

Natural enemies

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Natural enemyTypeLife stagesSpecificityReferencesBiological control inBiological control on
Agathis cinctus Parasite Larvae
Apanteles aristoteliae Parasite Larvae
Bacillus thuringiensis
Bacillus thuringiensis kurstaki Pathogen Larvae
Bracon gelechiae Parasite Larvae
Bracon hyslopi Parasite Larvae
Bracon stabilis Parasite Larvae
Choeras tiro Parasite Larvae
Copidosoma Parasite Eggs
Erynia radicans Pathogen Larvae
Exochus nigripalpis Parasite Larvae
Ischnus inquisitorius atriceps Parasite Larvae
Itoplectis conquisator Parasite Larvae
Itoplectis maculator Parasite Larvae USA
Itoplectis obesus Parasite Larvae
Itoplectis quadricingulata Parasite Larvae
Meteorus argyrotaeniae Parasite Larvae
Pigeria piger Parasite Larvae
Tranosema interrupta pterophorae Parasite Larvae
Tranosemella praerogator Parasite Larvae
Trichogramma chilonis Parasite Eggs
Trichogramma dendrolimi Parasite Eggs
Trichogramma evanescens Parasite Eggs

Plant Trade

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Plant parts liable to carry the pest in trade/transportPest stagesBorne internallyBorne externallyVisibility of pest or symptoms
True seeds (inc. grain) larvae Yes Pest or symptoms usually visible to the naked eye
Plant parts not known to carry the pest in trade/transport
Bark
Bulbs/Tubers/Corms/Rhizomes
Fruits (inc. pods)
Growing medium accompanying plants
Roots
Seedlings/Micropropagated plants
Wood

References

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Bathon H; Glas M, 1983. The distribution of the cereal leaf-roller, Cnephasia pumicana Zeller (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) in the German Federal Republic. First results of a pheromone-trap survey in 1982. Nachrichtenblatt des Deutschen Pflanzenschutzdienstes, 35(6):81-86

Bradley JD; Tremewan WG; Smith A, 1973. British Tortricoid Moths, Cochylidae and Tortricidae: Tortricinae. London, UK: Ray Society.

Carpenter A; Mitcham EJ; Cantwell MI; Reid M; Dodge LL; Ahumada M; Nie X; Biasi B; Neven L, 1996. Pre-commercial evaluation of a hypercarbic warm controlled atmosphere for the disinfestation of perishable crops. Proceedings of the Australasian postharvest horticulture conference 'Science and technology for the fresh food revolution', Melbourne, Australia, 18-22 September, 1995., 349-345; 17 ref.

Carter DJ, 1984. Pest Lepidoptera of Europe with special reference to the British Isles. Dordrecht, Netherlands: Dr. W. Junk.

Chambon JP; Genestier G, 1980. Identification and biology of the most common French species of the genus Cnephasia Curtis. Bulletin de la Societe Entomologique de France, 85(3/4):71-79

Coop L; Knight A; Fisher G, 1989. Parasitism of orange tortrix on caneberry, Rubus spp. in Western Oregon and Washington. Journal of the Entomological Society of British Columbia, 86:63-65

Glas M, 1986. Zur Biologie, +kologie, Verbreitung und BekSmpfung von Wicklern and Getreide, Cnephasia longana (Haworth) und C. pumicana (Zeller). PhD thesis. Hannover, Germany: University of Hannover.

Glas M, 1991. Tortricids in cereals. In: van der Geest, van Luis, eds. Tortricoid Pests: Their Biology, Natural Enemies and Control. World Crop Pests, 5:553-561.

Glas M; Hassan SA, 1985. Mass production and utilization of Trichogramma. 5. Control of two tortricids on cereals, Cnephasia longana (Haw.) and C. pumicana (Z.) (Lep., Tortricidae). Zeitschrift für Angewandte Entomologie, 99(4):393-399

Karsholt O; Razowski J, 1996. The Lepidoptera of Europe: a distributional checklist. Stenstrup, Denmark: Apollo Books, 380 pp.

Kontev CA; Chambon JP, 1975. Cereal leaf roller - Cnephasia pasiuana Hb. - pumicana Zell. (Lep. Tortricidae) - a new dangerous pest of cereals in France and Bulgaria. VIII International Plant Protection Congress, Moscow, 1975. Reports and informations. Section II. Progress in the study of biology of pest organisms and the development of forecast methods. Moscow. USSR, 186-195

Nielsen ES; Edwards ED; Rangsi TV, 1996. Checklist of the Lepidoptera of Australia. Checklist of the Lepidoptera of Australia., xiv + 529 pp.; [Monographs on Australian Lepidoptera Volume 4]; 34 pp. of ref.

Norton M, 1991. Timing Bacillus thuringiensis insecticides for omnivorous leafroller control in grapes. COMPONENTS, 2(1):5-6.

Distribution Maps

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