Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Strawberry necrotic shock virus
(Strawberry necrotic shock virus)

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Datasheet

Strawberry necrotic shock virus (Strawberry necrotic shock virus)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 27 September 2018
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Pest
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Strawberry necrotic shock virus
  • Preferred Common Name
  • Strawberry necrotic shock virus
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Virus
  •   Unknown: "Positive sense ssRNA viruses"
  •     Unknown: "RNA viruses"
  •       Family: Bromoviridae
  •         Genus: Ilarvirus
  • Summary of Invasiveness
  • Strawberry necrotic shock virus (SNSV) was first established as a distinct species in 2004 and its incidence in areas around the world is ambiguous. There are several reports of Tobacco streak virus (T...

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Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Strawberry necrotic shock virus

Preferred Common Name

  • Strawberry necrotic shock virus

Other Scientific Names

  • Black raspberry latent virus
  • Tobacco streak virus

Summary of Invasiveness

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Strawberry necrotic shock virus (SNSV) was first established as a distinct species in 2004 and its incidence in areas around the world is ambiguous. There are several reports of Tobacco streak virus (TSV) infection of strawberry and Rubus before the classification of SNSV as a distinct species and at this point it is unclear whether those refer to TSV or SNSV. Of the more than 100 small fruit 'TSV' isolates tested, all but two strawberries were found to be infected with SNSV (Tzanetakis and Martin, unpublished) indicating that TSV is rather rare in berry crops; it is still to be verified in natural infections of Rubus. It should be assumed that the majority of TSV reports in strawberry and Rubus are actually reports of SNSV and therefore the virus should be considered to have a cosmopolitan distribution.

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Virus
  •     Unknown: "Positive sense ssRNA viruses"
  •         Unknown: "RNA viruses"
  •             Family: Bromoviridae
  •                 Genus: Ilarvirus
  •                     Species: Strawberry necrotic shock virus

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Continent/Country/RegionDistributionLast ReportedOriginFirst ReportedInvasiveReferenceNotes

Asia

ChinaPresentLi and Yang, 2011
-HeilongjiangPresentLi and Yang, 2011
JapanPresentTzanetakis et al., 2004

North America

CanadaPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-British ColumbiaWidespreadNativeMartin and Tzanetakis, 2013
USAWidespreadTzanetakis et al., 2004
-CaliforniaPresentTzanetakis et al., 2004
-FloridaWidespreadMoyer et al., 2010
-MarylandWidespreadTzanetakis et al., 2004
-MassachusettsPresentMartin and Tzanetakis, 2013
-MississippiPresentTzanetakis et al., 2004
-North CarolinaPresentTzanetakis et al., 2004
-OregonWidespreadNativeTzanetakis et al., 2004
-WashingtonWidespreadNativeTzanetakis et al., 2004

Oceania

AustraliaPresentSharman et al., 2011Probably introduced from North America.
-QueenslandPresentSharman et al., 2011
-VictoriaPresentSharman et al., 2011

Habitat List

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CategorySub-CategoryHabitatPresenceStatus
Terrestrial
Terrestrial – ManagedCultivated / agricultural land Principal habitat Natural
Protected agriculture (e.g. glasshouse production) Present, no further details Natural

List of Symptoms/Signs

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SignLife StagesType
Growing point / dieback
Stems / dieback

Plant Trade

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Plant parts liable to carry the pest in trade/transportPest stagesBorne internallyBorne externallyVisibility of pest or symptoms
Bulbs/Tubers/Corms/Rhizomes Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Flowers/Inflorescences/Cones/Calyx Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Fruits (inc. pods) Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Leaves Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Roots Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Seedlings/Micropropagated plants Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
Stems (above ground)/Shoots/Trunks/Branches Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible
True seeds (inc. grain) Yes Pest or symptoms usually invisible

Vectors and Intermediate Hosts

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VectorSourceReferenceGroupDistribution
Thrips tabaciKlose et al., 1996. Insect

Risk and Impact Factors

Top of page Invasiveness
  • Abundant in its native range
  • Highly adaptable to different environments
  • Highly mobile locally
  • Has high genetic variability
Likelihood of entry/control
  • Highly likely to be transported internationally accidentally
  • Difficult to identify/detect as a commodity contaminant
  • Difficult to identify/detect in the field
  • Difficult/costly to control

References

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Adams MJ; Carstens EB, 2012. Ratification vote on taxonomic proposals to the International Committee on Taxonomy of Viruses (2012). Archives of Virology, 157:1411-1422.

Bol JF, 1999. Alfalfa mosaic virus and ilarviruses: involvement of coat protein in multiple steps of the replication cycle. Journal of General Virology, 80(5):1089-1102.

Converse RH, 1972. Tobacco streak virus in black raspberry. Phytopathology, 62(9):1001-1004.

Converse RH, 1979. Transmission of Tobacco streak virus in Rubus. Acta Horticulturae, 95:53-61.

Converse RH; Lister RM, 1969. The occurrence and some properties of black raspberry latent virus. Phytopathology, 59:325-333.

FRAZIER NW, 1966. Natural and experimental infection of Rubus with Strawberry necrotic shock virus. Phytopathology, 56(5):568-569.

FRAZIER NW; JORGENSEN PS; THOMAS HE; JOHNSON HA JUN, 1962. Necrotic shock-a virus disease of strawberries. Plant Disease Reporter, 46:547-50.

Fulton RW, 1967. Purification and some properties of Tobacco streak and Tulare apple mosaic viruses. Virology, 32:153-162.

Fulton RW, 1978. Superinfection by strains of tobacco streak virus. Virology, 85(1):1-8.

Johnson HA; Converse RH; Amorao A; Espejo JI; Frazier NW, 1984. Seed transmission of tobacco streak virus in strawberry. Plant Disease, 68(5):390-392

Jones AT; Mayo MA, 1975. Further properties of black raspberry latent virus, and evidence for its relationship to tobacco streak virus. Annals of Applied Biology, 79(3):297-306

Klose MJ; Sdoodee R; Teakle DS; Milne JR; Greber RS; Walter GH, 1996. Transmission of three strains of tobacco streak ilarvirus by different thrips species using virus-infected pollen. Journal of Phytopathology, 144(6):281-284; 21 ref.

Li L; Yang H, 2011. First report of Strawberry necrotic shock virus in China. Plant Disease, 95(9):1198. http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/loi/pdis

Martin RR; Tzanetakis IE, 2006. Characterization, detection and management of strawberry viruses. Plant Disease, 90:384-396.

Martin RR; Tzanetakis IE, 2013. High risk strawberry viruses by region in the United States and Canada: implications for certification, nurseries, and fruit production. Plant Disease, 97(10):1358-1362. http://apsjournals.apsnet.org/loi/pdis

Moyer C; Whitaker VN; Peres NA, 2010. Viral Diseases of Strawberries. Gainesville, USA: Institute of Food and Agricultural Sciences. https://edis.ifas.ufl.edu/pdffiles/PP/PP27300.pdf

Sharman M; Constable F; Perera R; Thomas JE, 2011. First report of Strawberry necrotic shock virus infecting strawberry (Fragaria vesca) from Australia. Australasian Plant Disease Notes, 6(1):54-56. http://www.springerlink.com/content/w58267380154 g182/fulltext.html

Stace-Smith R; Converse RH; Johnson HA, 1987. Tobacco streak virus in strawberry. In: Virus diseases of small fruit. USDA ARS Agriculture Handbook, No 631 [ed. by Converse, R. H.]. Washington DC, USA: USDA-ARS, 57-60.

STACE-SMITH R; FRAZIER NW, 1971. Tobacco streak virus isolated from strawberry infected with necrotic shock. Phytopathology, 61(7):757-758.

Stenger DC; Mullin RH; Morris TJ, 1987. Characterization and detection of the strawberry necrotic shock isolate of tobacco streak virus. Phytopathology, 77(9):1330-1337

Tzanetakis IE; Mackey IC; Martin RR, 2004. Strawberry necrotic shock virus is a distinct virus and not a strain of Tobacco streak virus. Archives of Virology, 149(10):2001-2011.

Tzanetakis IE; Martin RR; Scott SW, 2010. Genomic sequences of blackberry chlorotic ringspot virus and strawberry necrotic shock virus and the phylogeny of viruses in subgroup 1 of the genus Ilarvirus. Archives of Virology, 155(4):557-561. http://springerlink.metapress.com/content/x17l5g840m1t2411/?p=f61cf614de164de0be5cb1db079a93a5&pi=13

Distribution Maps

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