Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Xanthocyparis nootkatensis

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Datasheet

Xanthocyparis nootkatensis

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 16 November 2018
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Invasive Species
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Xanthocyparis nootkatensis
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Plantae
  •     Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •       Subphylum: Gymnospermae
  •         Class: Pinopsida
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    Compendia
    CAB International
    Wallingford
    Oxfordshire
    OX10 8DE
    UK
    compend@cabi.org
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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
A cohort of old (>500-year-old), forked-crown, X. nootkatensis on a montane site in coastal British Columbia.
TitleAncient trees
CaptionA cohort of old (>500-year-old), forked-crown, X. nootkatensis on a montane site in coastal British Columbia.
CopyrightK. Klinka
A cohort of old (>500-year-old), forked-crown, X. nootkatensis on a montane site in coastal British Columbia.
Ancient treesA cohort of old (>500-year-old), forked-crown, X. nootkatensis on a montane site in coastal British Columbia. K. Klinka
X. nootkatensis has wide edaphic amplitude - although its growth is poor, it is very frequent on wet and nutrient-poor in perhumid climates of coastal Alaska and British Columbia. Notice the stratified stand structure: X. nootkatensis in the upper stratum and Tsuga heterophylla in the lower stratum.
TitleForest
CaptionX. nootkatensis has wide edaphic amplitude - although its growth is poor, it is very frequent on wet and nutrient-poor in perhumid climates of coastal Alaska and British Columbia. Notice the stratified stand structure: X. nootkatensis in the upper stratum and Tsuga heterophylla in the lower stratum.
CopyrightK. Klinka
X. nootkatensis has wide edaphic amplitude - although its growth is poor, it is very frequent on wet and nutrient-poor in perhumid climates of coastal Alaska and British Columbia. Notice the stratified stand structure: X. nootkatensis in the upper stratum and Tsuga heterophylla in the lower stratum.
ForestX. nootkatensis has wide edaphic amplitude - although its growth is poor, it is very frequent on wet and nutrient-poor in perhumid climates of coastal Alaska and British Columbia. Notice the stratified stand structure: X. nootkatensis in the upper stratum and Tsuga heterophylla in the lower stratum.K. Klinka
X. nootkatensis may be present in early stages of primary succession on water-deficient sites, such as on talus, in the Pacific high-altitude forest. Vegetative reproduction by layering may predominate on these sites.
TitleEarly succession
CaptionX. nootkatensis may be present in early stages of primary succession on water-deficient sites, such as on talus, in the Pacific high-altitude forest. Vegetative reproduction by layering may predominate on these sites.
CopyrightK. Klinka
X. nootkatensis may be present in early stages of primary succession on water-deficient sites, such as on talus, in the Pacific high-altitude forest. Vegetative reproduction by layering may predominate on these sites.
Early successionX. nootkatensis may be present in early stages of primary succession on water-deficient sites, such as on talus, in the Pacific high-altitude forest. Vegetative reproduction by layering may predominate on these sites. K. Klinka
Like Thuja plicata, X. nootkatensis is easily established by planting. However, many high-altitude, unburnt cutovers may regenerate naturally - most often to Abies amabilis and X. nootkatensis mixtures.
TitleNatural regeneration
CaptionLike Thuja plicata, X. nootkatensis is easily established by planting. However, many high-altitude, unburnt cutovers may regenerate naturally - most often to Abies amabilis and X. nootkatensis mixtures.
CopyrightK. Klinka
Like Thuja plicata, X. nootkatensis is easily established by planting. However, many high-altitude, unburnt cutovers may regenerate naturally - most often to Abies amabilis and X. nootkatensis mixtures.
Natural regenerationLike Thuja plicata, X. nootkatensis is easily established by planting. However, many high-altitude, unburnt cutovers may regenerate naturally - most often to Abies amabilis and X. nootkatensis mixtures.K. Klinka
Shade tolerance of X. nootkatensis is as high as that of Abies amabilis and Thuja plicata. Relatively young (<25 years) seedlings of X. nootkatensis that have established and survived underneath a dense canopy of blueberries in less than 10% of above canopy light.
TitleSeedling
CaptionShade tolerance of X. nootkatensis is as high as that of Abies amabilis and Thuja plicata. Relatively young (<25 years) seedlings of X. nootkatensis that have established and survived underneath a dense canopy of blueberries in less than 10% of above canopy light.
CopyrightK. Klinka
Shade tolerance of X. nootkatensis is as high as that of Abies amabilis and Thuja plicata. Relatively young (<25 years) seedlings of X. nootkatensis that have established and survived underneath a dense canopy of blueberries in less than 10% of above canopy light.
SeedlingShade tolerance of X. nootkatensis is as high as that of Abies amabilis and Thuja plicata. Relatively young (<25 years) seedlings of X. nootkatensis that have established and survived underneath a dense canopy of blueberries in less than 10% of above canopy light.K. Klinka
X. nootkatensis reproduces from seed as well as vegetatively. The vegetative reproduction is by layering (rooting of low-hanging branches), rooting of fallen branches, or branch development into stems on fallen trees that have remained alive. This photograph shows branch development into stems on the uprooted sapling of X. nootkatensis on cutover site in the Pacific high-altitude forest.
TitleVegetative reproduction
CaptionX. nootkatensis reproduces from seed as well as vegetatively. The vegetative reproduction is by layering (rooting of low-hanging branches), rooting of fallen branches, or branch development into stems on fallen trees that have remained alive. This photograph shows branch development into stems on the uprooted sapling of X. nootkatensis on cutover site in the Pacific high-altitude forest.
CopyrightK. Klinka
X. nootkatensis reproduces from seed as well as vegetatively. The vegetative reproduction is by layering (rooting of low-hanging branches), rooting of fallen branches, or branch development into stems on fallen trees that have remained alive. This photograph shows branch development into stems on the uprooted sapling of X. nootkatensis on cutover site in the Pacific high-altitude forest.
Vegetative reproductionX. nootkatensis reproduces from seed as well as vegetatively. The vegetative reproduction is by layering (rooting of low-hanging branches), rooting of fallen branches, or branch development into stems on fallen trees that have remained alive. This photograph shows branch development into stems on the uprooted sapling of X. nootkatensis on cutover site in the Pacific high-altitude forest.K. Klinka
Split blocks of old-growth X. nootkatensis that were salvaged after harvesting high-altitude sites are ready to be exported to Japan (International Forest Products, Ltd., Sechelt, British Columbia).
TitleTimber
CaptionSplit blocks of old-growth X. nootkatensis that were salvaged after harvesting high-altitude sites are ready to be exported to Japan (International Forest Products, Ltd., Sechelt, British Columbia).
CopyrightK. Klinka
Split blocks of old-growth X. nootkatensis that were salvaged after harvesting high-altitude sites are ready to be exported to Japan (International Forest Products, Ltd., Sechelt, British Columbia).
TimberSplit blocks of old-growth X. nootkatensis that were salvaged after harvesting high-altitude sites are ready to be exported to Japan (International Forest Products, Ltd., Sechelt, British Columbia). K. Klinka

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Xanthocyparis nootkatensis

Local Common Names

  • Denmark: Nutka-?delcypres
  • Norway: Nutkasypress
  • Sweden: Nutkacypress

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Plantae
  •         Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •             Subphylum: Gymnospermae
  •                 Class: Pinopsida
  •                     Family: Cupressaceae
  •                         Genus: Xanthocyparis
  •                             Species: Xanthocyparis nootkatensis

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Continent/Country/RegionDistributionLast ReportedOriginFirst ReportedInvasiveReferenceNotes

North America

CanadaPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases
-British ColumbiaPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases
USAPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases
-AlaskaPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases
-CaliforniaPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases
-OregonPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases
-WashingtonPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases

Europe

DenmarkPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases
FinlandPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases
FrancePresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases
IrelandPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases
NorwayPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases
SwedenPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases
UKPresentDatamining 2011 - Invasive Species Databases

Habitat List

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CategorySub-CategoryHabitatPresenceStatus
Terrestrial

Links to Websites

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WebsiteURLComment
GISD/IASPMR: Invasive Alien Species Pathway Management Resource and DAISIE European Invasive Alien Species Gatewayhttps://doi.org/10.5061/dryad.m93f6Data source for updated system data added to species habitat list.

Distribution Maps

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