Invasive Species Compendium

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Datasheet

Floating vegetation and debris (pathway vector)

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Datasheet

Floating vegetation and debris (pathway vector)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 12 June 2017
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Pathway Vector
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Floating vegetation and debris (pathway vector)
  • There are no pictures available for this datasheet

    If you can supply pictures for this datasheet please contact:

    Compendia
    CAB International
    Wallingford
    Oxfordshire
    OX10 8DE
    UK
    compend@cabi.org

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
A 66' long concrete dock, debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA on June 5 2012.
TitleDebris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunami
CaptionA 66' long concrete dock, debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA on June 5 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
A 66' long concrete dock, debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA on June 5 2012.
Debris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunamiA 66' long concrete dock, debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA on June 5 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Tsunami debris from a stranded floating dock; metal placard bearing Japanese text, showing details of manufacturer and fabrication date. Washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012
TitleDebris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunami in Japan
CaptionTsunami debris from a stranded floating dock; metal placard bearing Japanese text, showing details of manufacturer and fabrication date. Washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Tsunami debris from a stranded floating dock; metal placard bearing Japanese text, showing details of manufacturer and fabrication date. Washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012
Debris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunami in JapanTsunami debris from a stranded floating dock; metal placard bearing Japanese text, showing details of manufacturer and fabrication date. Washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Exotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
TitleExotic mussels and unidentified barnacles
CaptionExotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Exotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
Exotic mussels and unidentified barnaclesExotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Exotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
TitleExotic mussels and unidentified barnacles
CaptionExotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Exotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
Exotic mussels and unidentified barnaclesExotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
TitleMarine organisms removed from the Agate Beach derelict dock were buried landward from the site
CaptionOregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
Marine organisms removed from the Agate Beach derelict dock were buried landward from the siteOregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
TitleMarine organisms removed from the Agate Beach derelict dock were buried landward from the site
CaptionOregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
Marine organisms removed from the Agate Beach derelict dock were buried landward from the siteOregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
The structure was scraped clean then, low-pressure torches were used to sterilize the dock. All removed material was bagged, hauled up the beach well above the high tide line and stored temporarily. Agate Beach, Oregon, USA. June 2012.
TitleWorker cleaning the stranded dock
CaptionThe structure was scraped clean then, low-pressure torches were used to sterilize the dock. All removed material was bagged, hauled up the beach well above the high tide line and stored temporarily. Agate Beach, Oregon, USA. June 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
The structure was scraped clean then, low-pressure torches were used to sterilize the dock. All removed material was bagged, hauled up the beach well above the high tide line and stored temporarily. Agate Beach, Oregon, USA. June 2012.
Worker cleaning the stranded dockThe structure was scraped clean then, low-pressure torches were used to sterilize the dock. All removed material was bagged, hauled up the beach well above the high tide line and stored temporarily. Agate Beach, Oregon, USA. June 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Floating vegetation and debris (pathway vector)