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Datasheet

Floating vegetation and debris (pathway vector)

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Datasheet

Floating vegetation and debris (pathway vector)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 12 June 2017
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Pathway Vector
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Floating vegetation and debris (pathway vector)
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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
A 66' long concrete dock, debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA on June 5 2012.
TitleDebris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunami
CaptionA 66' long concrete dock, debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA on June 5 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
A 66' long concrete dock, debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA on June 5 2012.
Debris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunamiA 66' long concrete dock, debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA on June 5 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Tsunami debris from a stranded floating dock; metal placard bearing Japanese text, showing details of manufacturer and fabrication date. Washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012
TitleDebris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunami in Japan
CaptionTsunami debris from a stranded floating dock; metal placard bearing Japanese text, showing details of manufacturer and fabrication date. Washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Tsunami debris from a stranded floating dock; metal placard bearing Japanese text, showing details of manufacturer and fabrication date. Washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012
Debris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunami in JapanTsunami debris from a stranded floating dock; metal placard bearing Japanese text, showing details of manufacturer and fabrication date. Washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Exotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
TitleExotic mussels and unidentified barnacles
CaptionExotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Exotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
Exotic mussels and unidentified barnaclesExotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Exotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
TitleExotic mussels and unidentified barnacles
CaptionExotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Exotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
Exotic mussels and unidentified barnaclesExotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
TitleMarine organisms removed from the Agate Beach derelict dock were buried landward from the site
CaptionOregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
Marine organisms removed from the Agate Beach derelict dock were buried landward from the siteOregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
TitleMarine organisms removed from the Agate Beach derelict dock were buried landward from the site
CaptionOregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
Marine organisms removed from the Agate Beach derelict dock were buried landward from the siteOregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
The structure was scraped clean then, low-pressure torches were used to sterilize the dock. All removed material was bagged, hauled up the beach well above the high tide line and stored temporarily. Agate Beach, Oregon, USA. June 2012.
TitleWorker cleaning the stranded dock
CaptionThe structure was scraped clean then, low-pressure torches were used to sterilize the dock. All removed material was bagged, hauled up the beach well above the high tide line and stored temporarily. Agate Beach, Oregon, USA. June 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
The structure was scraped clean then, low-pressure torches were used to sterilize the dock. All removed material was bagged, hauled up the beach well above the high tide line and stored temporarily. Agate Beach, Oregon, USA. June 2012.
Worker cleaning the stranded dockThe structure was scraped clean then, low-pressure torches were used to sterilize the dock. All removed material was bagged, hauled up the beach well above the high tide line and stored temporarily. Agate Beach, Oregon, USA. June 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Floating vegetation and debris (pathway vector)

Species Transported by Vector

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SpeciesNotesLong DistanceLocalReferences
Adiantum raddianum (delta maidenhair fern) Yes
Agave americana (century plant)Seeds, bulbils and stem fragments Yes Yes Weeds of Australia (2016)
Alectra vogelii (yellow witchweed)Seed in water run-off across fields Yes Parker and Riches (1993)
Alternanthera philoxeroides (alligator weed)Stem and root fragments Yes Yes Langeland et al. (2008)
Alternanthera sessilis (sessile joyweed)Stems and fruits Yes Yes Holm et al. (1997)
Ammophila arenaria (marram grass) Yes Yes Konlechner and Hilton (2009)
Annona glabra (pond apple) Yes Land Protection (2005)
Anredera cordifolia (Madeira vine) Yes
Arthraxon hispidus (small carpetgrass) Yes
Asterias amurensis (northern Pacific seastar)E.g. debris from the 2011 Tohoku tsunami carried individuals from the Japanese coast to Oregon Yes
Austrocylindropuntia cylindrica (cane cactus) Yes
Austrocylindropuntia subulata (Eve’s needle cactus) Yes
Bacopa monnieri (water hyssop)seed and stem fragments Yes Yes PROSEA (2017)
Bactrocera cucurbitae (melon fly)Most frequently eggs and larvae inside fruit Yes Yes
Bactrocera dorsalis (Oriental fruit fly)Fruits infested with larvae and/or eggs Yes Yes
Bactrocera zonata (peach fruit fly)Fruits infested with larvae and/or eggs Yes
Barringtonia asiatica (sea poison tree)Fruits Yes Yes Yaplito (2001)
Basella alba (malabar spinach)Possible at it grows near streams and rivers Yes PIER (2017)
Batis maritima (saltwort) Yes Yes
Bergia capensis (white water fire)Possible from flooding or transport through irrigation channels or streams Yes Leach (1989)
Botrylloides perspicuusAdult colonies or colony fragments Yes Yes
Brachypodium sylvaticum (slender false brome)Frequency is not documented, but common along rivers and streams Yes Yes
Brassica rapa (field mustard)Possible as it grows at river margins Yes Kell (2011)
Brassica tournefortii (African mustard)Seeds Yes Bangle et al. (2008)
Cabomba caroliniana (Carolina fanwort) Yes ISSG (2008)
Caesalpinia pulcherrima (peacock flower)Species is known to grow along waterways and in floodplains Yes Yes Graveson (2012)
Canna indica (canna lilly) Yes
Caprella muticaMales, ovigerous females and juvenile C. mutica have been found attached to drift macroalgae Yes Yes Ashton (2006)
Cassytha filiformis (love-vine)Fruits float in sea water Yes Werth et al. (1979)
Ceratophyllum demersum (coontail)Erratic, flood events Yes
Ciona intestinalis (sea vase)Adult stage, infrequent Yes Yes
Ciona savignyiAdult stage, infrequent Yes Yes
Cocos nucifera (coconut)Nuts can survive up to 120 days floating in the sea Yes Yes Chan and Elevitch (2006)
Coix lacryma-jobi (Job's-tears)Floating involucres are carried by water Yes Weed Watch (2010)
Colocasia esculenta (taro)Corm and stem fragments Yes Yes Safo-Kantaka (2004)
Coptotermes gestroi (Asian subterranean termite)If wooden Yes Yes Scheffrahn and Su (2000)
Corbicula fluminea (Asian clam)Byssal attachment of pediveliger larvae and juveniles for downstream spread Yes Prezant and Chalermwat (1984)
Corella eumyota (orange-tipped sea squirt)Adults Yes Yes Wasson et al. (2001); Lambert (2004); Minchin (2007); El-Nagar et al. (2010)
Cornus sericea (redosier dogwood)Parts of plant transported by water Yes Kelly (1990)
Cosmos sulphureus (sulphur cosmos)Dispersal by water debris is possible as species grows along riverbanks and coastal areas Yes Vascular Plants of Ecuador (2016)
Crassostrea virginica (eastern oyster) Yes
Crassula helmsii (Australian swamp stonecrop) Yes CAPM-CEH (2004)
Crepidula fornicata (American slipper limpet)Evoqued for the introduction in Netherlands Yes
Cuphea carthagenensis (Colombian waxweed) Yes Technigro (2011)
Cyperus imbricatus (shingle flatsedge)Seeds and stem segments Yes Yes Queensland Department of Primary Industries and Fisheries (2011)
Cyperus papyrus (papyrus) Yes Yes
Datura innoxia (downy thorn apple) Yes
Derris elliptica (tuba root)Seed and stem fragments float on water Yes Yes Kaua’i Invasive Species Committee (2012)
Dioscorea bulbifera (air potato)Bulbils Yes Yes Schultz (1993)
Diplazium esculentum (vegetable fern)Possible as it occurs near waterways Yes HEAR (2020)
Dreissena rostriformis bugensis (quagga mussel)Can be carried by water currents whilst attached to uprooted macrophytes Yes Horvath and Lamberti (1997)
Echinochloa pyramidalis Yes
Echinocystis lobata (wild cucumber) Yes Yes
Eichhornia paniculata (Brazilian water hyacinth) Yes Yes Husband and Barrett (1998)
Elodea canadensis (Canadian pondweed)Erratic, flood events Yes Barrat-Segretain and Elger; 2004
Elodea nuttallii (Nuttall's waterweed) Yes
Epiphyllum oxypetalum (dutchman's-pipe cactus)Stem fragments, seeds Yes Yes Lim (2014)
Eucheuma spp.Live vegetative stage Yes
Fallopia japonica (Japanese knotweed)During flood events or after flail mowing Yes
Ficus elastica (rubber plant)Grows in coastal areas and could be dispersed by water Yes Yes Catalogue of the Vascular Plants of Ecuador (2014); Randall (2012)
Ficus pumila (creeping fig)Can reproduce by vegatative fragmentation Yes Yes
Forficula auricularia (European earwig) Yes
Funtumia elastica (West African rubber tree)It is possible it is being dispersed through waterways in Martinique Yes Fleriag (2010)
Gammarus tigrinusPotential to disperse on floating seaweed Yes Myers (1993)
Gracilaria salicorniaFragment dispersal Yes Smith et al. (2004)
Grateloupia turuturuLocalised transport of macroscopic plants via 'stone-rafting' or drifting of fertile blades on small Yes Simon et al. (2001)
Gymnocoronis spilanthoides (Senegal tea plant)Stem fragments Yes Weeds CRC (2008)
Hedychium coronarium (white butterfly ginger lily) Yes
Hedychium flavescens (wild ginger) Yes Yes
Hedychium gardnerianum (kahili ginger) Yes Yes
Hemigrapsus sanguineus (Asian shore crab)E.g. debris from 2011 Tohoku tsunami carried individuals from Japanese coast to Oregon Yes
Heracleum persicum (Persian hogweed) Yes Yes
Hibiscus tiliaceus (coast cottonwood) Yes Yes
Hydrilla verticillata (hydrilla) Yes
Hydrocharis morsus-ranae Yes USGS-NAS (2002)
Hygrophila polysperma (Indian swampweed) Yes FNW Disseminules (2007)
Hymenachne amplexicaulis (hymenachne)Fragments of stolon Yes Australian Weeds Committee (2012)
Hypnea musciformisDetached plants entwined and rafting attached to Sargassum spp. Yes Russell and Balazs (1994)
Hyptis brevipes (lesser roundweed) Yes
Jatropha gossypiifolia (bellyache bush) Yes
Juncus effusus (common rush) Yes
Lagarosiphon major (African elodea) Yes Cronk and Fuller (1995)
Lagenaria siceraria (bottle gourd)Fruits float in the sea and can be dispersed by sea currents Yes Yes PROTA (2018)
Lemna aequinoctialis (lesser duckweed)Could be moved by water into connected waterways Yes
Lemna perpusilla (duckweed)A. Mikulyuk, Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources, USA, personal communcation, 2010 Yes
Lepidium latifolium (perennial pepperweed) Yes
Leptochloa fusca (sprangletop) Yes
Limax maximus (leopard slug)Not uncommon Yes
Limnocharis flava (yellow bur-head) Yes
Limnoperna fortunei (golden mussel)Fixed juveniles and adults Yes Boltovskoy et al. (2006)
Limnoria lignorum (gribble)Drift of infected wood Yes Yes Thiel and Haye (2006); Vinogradov et al. (2006)
Limnoria quadripunctata (gribble)Intermittent dispersal of adults Yes Yes Thiel and Haye (2006)
Ludwigia grandiflora (water primrose) Yes Ruaux et al. (2009)
Ludwigia peploides (water primrose) Yes Ruaux et al. (2009)
Lygodium microphyllum (old world climbing fern) Yes
Marisa cornuarietis (giant ramshorn)Eggs and snails associated with water transported vegetation debris Yes
Melanoides tuberculata (red-rimmed melania) Yes Yes
Mesosphaerum pectinatum (comb bushmint) Yes Yes
Microstegium vimineum (Nepalese browntop) Yes
Mikania micrantha (bitter vine) Yes
Mimosa casta (graceful mimosa)Fruits and seeds Yes Yes USDA-ARS (2012)
Mimosa ceratonia (climbing mimosa)Fruits and seeds Yes USDA-ARS (2012)
Monochoria hastata (hastate-leaved pondweed)Dispersed by interconnected waterways and flooding Yes Yes Ali et al. (2018)
Mononychellus tanajoa (cassava green mite)Eggs, crawlers/adults. Rare pathway Yes
Morinda citrifolia (Indian mulberry)Seeds can float in water for months Yes Yes Nelson (2006)
Moringa oleifera (horse radish tree)Species commonly found near waterways Yes Csurhes and Navie (2016)
Myriophyllum aquaticum (parrot's feather) Yes
Myriophyllum heterophyllum (broadleaf watermilfoil)Vegetative fragments can re-root Yes
Myriophyllum spicatum (spiked watermilfoil) Yes
Nephrolepis hirsutula (sword fern)Possible as it is reported from lake margins Yes Chambers (1987)
Nymphaea lotus (white Egyptian lotus) Yes
Nymphoides peltata (yellow floating-heart) Yes USGS-NAS (2007)
Oldenlandia lancifolia (calycose mille graines)Seeds as contaminant Yes Yes Pringle (1982)
Opuntia elatior (red-flower prickly pear) Yes
Oryza barthii Yes
Osteopilus septentrionalis (Cuban treefrog) Yes Yes Somma et al. (2018)
Pachira aquatica (pachira nut)Floating seeds disperse by water Yes Yes Lopez (2001); Infante-Mata et al. (2014)
Palaemon elegans (rock shrimp) Yes
Pandanus tectorius (screw pine) Yes Yes
Parthenium hysterophorus (parthenium weed) Yes Baiwa et al. (2016)
Paspalum vaginatum (seashore paspalum) Yes Yes
Peromyscus fraterculus (Northern Baja deermouse) Yes Hafner et al. (2001)
Petrea volubilis (queen's wreath)Seeds can be water dispersed Yes Monaco Nature Encyclopedia (2019)
Petricolaria pholadiformis (false angel wing) Yes Yes Rosenthal (1980)
Phytophthora kernoviaeTransport of diseased abscised leaves Yes Benson et al. (2010)
Pinctada imbricata radiata (rayed pearl oyster) Yes Yes
Pistia stratiotes (water lettuce) Yes Parsons and Cuthbertson (2001)
Plantago coronopus (Buck's-horn plantain) Yes
Plectranthus amboinicus (Indian borage)Occurs near coastal areas Yes Yes Roux (2003)
Plectranthus scutellarioides (coleus) Yes Yes Flora of China Editorial Committee (2014); Missouri Botanical Garden (2014b); Wagner et al. (1999)
Polypogon monspeliensis (annual beard grass) Yes
Pomacea maculataHatchlings, juveniles, adults Yes
Potamogeton crispus (curlyleaf pondweed) Yes
Potamopyrgus antipodarum (New Zealand mudsnail)Downstream movements Yes Alonso and Castro-Díez (2008)
Ralstonia solanacearum (bacterial wilt of potato) Yes
Rattus norvegicus (brown rat)May assist local disperse to new islands Yes
Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove) Yes
Rosa rugosa (rugosa rose)To Norway and along coast Yes Yes Fremstad (1997)
Saccharum ravennae (ravenna grass) Yes
Sagittaria latifolia (broadleaf arrowhead)As tubers Yes USDA-NRCS (2002)
Salvinia auriculata (giant salvinia) Yes ISSG (2009)
Salvinia minima Yes ISSG (2006)
Salvinia molesta (kariba weed) Yes McFarland et al. (2004)
Sanchezia parvibracteata (sanchezia)Stem fragments often spread by flowing water Yes Yes PIER (2014)
Sargassum muticum (wire weed) Yes
Scaevola taccada (beach naupaka) Yes Yes ISSG (2012)
Senna septemtrionalis (smooth senna)Mass movement of soil and flood debris Yes Yes West (2003)
Sida acuta (sida) Yes Pettit and Froend (2001)
Solanum erianthum (potato tree)Grows along riverbanks in Taiwan Yes Flora of Taiwan Editorial Committee (2014); Roe (1979)
Solanum mammosum (nipplefruit nightshade)Bulky seeds may be dispersed by drain water after a rainstorm Yes Yes Chiarini and Barboza (2007); Chiarini and Barboza (2009); Nee (1979); Nee (1991)
Solenopsis invicta (red imported fire ant)Queen, workers Yes Taber (2000)
Spartina alterniflora (smooth cordgrass)Seeds and rhizomes spread via spring and winter tides. Yes Yes Simenstad and Thom (1995)
Spartina anglica (common cordgrass) Yes Yes Gray et al. (1991)
Sphaerodactylus vincenti (Saint Vincent dwarf gecko)Likely pathway, thus native Yes King (1962)
Sporisorium pulverulentum (Sporisorium smut of wild Saccharum) Yes
Stictocardia tiliifolia (spottedheart)The species is reported as dispersed by water currents Yes Yes PIER (2019)
Syzygium grande (sea apple)Water dispersal is possible as species grows along coastal edge forests Yes Henderson (1949); National University of Singapore (2015); PIER (2015); Wyatt Smith (1953)
Tamarix ramosissima (saltcedar) Yes
Terminalia catappa (Singapore almond)Fruits float- dispersed by sea-currents Yes Yes Thomson and Evans (2006)
Thespesia populnea (portia tree) Yes Yes
Tomato brown rugose fruit virus (Tomato brown rugose fruit virus) Yes
Trapa natans (waterchestnut) Yes GBIF (2008)
Tricellaria inopinataE.g. debris from the 2011 Tohoku tsunami carried individuals from the Japanese coast to Oregon Yes Yes Blauwe and Faasse (2001)
Typha x glauca (hybrid cattail)Rhizome fragments Yes Grace and Harrison (1986)
Undaria pinnatifida (Asian kelp)Found attached to Japanese dock debris washed ashore in Oregon, USA after Tohoku tsunami in 2011 Yes
Vitex rotundifolia (beach vitex)Corky pericarp of fruits float for water based dispersal with ocean currents Yes Yes Munir (1987)
Wasmannia auropunctata (little fire ant) Yes
Zeuxine strateumatica (soldier’s orchid)Possible as it occurs at riverbanks, wetlands and lagoons Yes