Invasive Species Compendium

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Datasheet

Flooding and other natural disasters (pathway cause)

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Datasheet

Flooding and other natural disasters (pathway cause)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 12 June 2017
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Pathway Cause
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Flooding and other natural disasters (pathway cause)

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
A 66' long concrete dock, debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA on June 5 2012.
TitleDebris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunami
CaptionA 66' long concrete dock, debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA on June 5 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
A 66' long concrete dock, debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA on June 5 2012.
Debris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunamiA 66' long concrete dock, debris from the March 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA on June 5 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
A 66' long concrete dock, debris from the 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA, on June 05 2012.
TitleDebris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunami
CaptionA 66' long concrete dock, debris from the 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA, on June 05 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
A 66' long concrete dock, debris from the 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA, on June 05 2012.
Debris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunamiA 66' long concrete dock, debris from the 2011 tsunami in Tohuku, Japan, which washed ashore at Agate Beach one mile north of Newport, Oregon, USA, on June 05 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Tsunami debris from a stranded floating dock; metal placard bearing Japanese text, showing details of manufacturer and fabrication date. Washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012
TitleDebris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunami in Japan
CaptionTsunami debris from a stranded floating dock; metal placard bearing Japanese text, showing details of manufacturer and fabrication date. Washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Tsunami debris from a stranded floating dock; metal placard bearing Japanese text, showing details of manufacturer and fabrication date. Washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012
Debris from the March 2011 Tohuku tsunami in JapanTsunami debris from a stranded floating dock; metal placard bearing Japanese text, showing details of manufacturer and fabrication date. Washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Undaria pinnatifida washed ashore in Oregon, USA, attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011.
TitleUndaria pinnatifida, commonly called 'wakame', a well known invasive
CaptionUndaria pinnatifida washed ashore in Oregon, USA, attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Undaria pinnatifida washed ashore in Oregon, USA, attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011.
Undaria pinnatifida, commonly called 'wakame', a well known invasiveUndaria pinnatifida washed ashore in Oregon, USA, attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Exotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
TitleExotic mussels and unidentified barnacles
CaptionExotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Exotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
Exotic mussels and unidentified barnaclesExotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Exotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
TitleExotic mussels and unidentified barnacles
CaptionExotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Exotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.
Exotic mussels and unidentified barnaclesExotic mussels (Mytilus edulis or M. galloprovicialis) and unidentified barnacles attached to a Japanese dock dislodged during the Tohoku tsunami of March 2011 and washed ashore in Oregon, USA in June 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
TitleMarine organisms removed from the Agate Beach derelict dock were buried landward from the site
CaptionOregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
Marine organisms removed from the Agate Beach derelict dock were buried landward from the siteOregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
TitleMarine organisms removed from the Agate Beach derelict dock were buried landward from the site
CaptionOregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
Oregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.
Marine organisms removed from the Agate Beach derelict dock were buried landward from the siteOregon Department of Fish & Wildlife staff and volunteers removed around a ton and a half of plant and animal material, which were then buried, landward from the site approx. 2.4m deep far above the furthest reach of high tides and storm surges.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
The structure was scraped clean then, low-pressure torches were used to sterilize the dock. All removed material was bagged, hauled up the beach well above the high tide line and stored temporarily. Agate Beach, Oregon, USA. June 2012.
TitleWorker cleaning the stranded dock
CaptionThe structure was scraped clean then, low-pressure torches were used to sterilize the dock. All removed material was bagged, hauled up the beach well above the high tide line and stored temporarily. Agate Beach, Oregon, USA. June 2012.
Copyright©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012
The structure was scraped clean then, low-pressure torches were used to sterilize the dock. All removed material was bagged, hauled up the beach well above the high tide line and stored temporarily. Agate Beach, Oregon, USA. June 2012.
Worker cleaning the stranded dockThe structure was scraped clean then, low-pressure torches were used to sterilize the dock. All removed material was bagged, hauled up the beach well above the high tide line and stored temporarily. Agate Beach, Oregon, USA. June 2012.©Oregon Parks and Recreation Department-2012

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Flooding and other natural disasters (pathway cause)

Species Transported by Cause

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SpeciesNotesLong DistanceLocalReferences
Acacia crassicarpa (northern wattle) Yes
Acacia glauca (wild dividivi) Yes
Acacia hockii Yes
Acacia saligna (Port Jackson wattle)Along watercourses Yes Cronk and Fuller, 1995
Alternanthera philoxeroides (alligator weed)Stem and root fragments Yes Yes Weeds of Australia, 2016
Ambrosia artemisiifolia (common ragweed) Yes
Ambrosia trifida (giant ragweed) Yes
Ameiurus melas (black bullhead) Yes Yes
Andropogon virginicus (broomsedge) Yes
Annona glabra (pond apple) Yes Land Protection, 2005
Anredera cordifolia (Madeira vine) Yes
Aphanomyces astaci Yes Oidtmann et al., 2005
Arundo donax (giant reed) Yes PIER, 2007
Aspius aspius (asp) Yes
Asterias amurensis (northern Pacific seastar)E.g. the 2011 Tohoku tsunami carried individuals from the Japanese coast to Oregon Yes
Bassia hyssopifolia (fivehook bassia) Yes
Batis maritima (saltwort) Yes
Bocconia frutescens (plume poppy)Frequently encountered in gulches below infestation site - seeds washed down during heavy rains Yes Benitez and Saulibio, 2007
Bontia daphnoides (white alling)Possible fruit dispersal by coastal flooding Yes Yes Cronk and Fuller, 1995
Brachypodium sylvaticum (slender false brome)Not documented but possible Yes Yes
Brugmansia suaveolens (white angel's trumpet) Yes
Buddleja davidii (butterfly bush) Yes Yes
Cabomba caroliniana (Carolina fanwort) Yes
Canna indica (canna lilly) Yes
Capsicum annuum (bell pepper)Grows in coastal areas where flooding would be possible Yes Yes Vascular Plants of Ecuador, 2014
Carex kobomugi (Asiatic sand sedge)Dispersed to New York from New Jersey after Hurricane Sandy in 2012. Louise Wootton, Georgian Court Yes Yes Lamont and Young, 2014
Cecropia peltata (trumpet tree) Yes Cronk and Fuller, 1995
Ceratophyllum demersum (coontail) Yes
Chilo suppressalis (striped rice stem borer) Yes
Christella dentata (soft fern)As a facultative wetland plant one could imagine its spread by this means. Yes USDA-NRCS, 2012
Cichla ocellaris (peacock cichlid)As in Panama Yes Zaret and Paine, 1973
Cinnamomum verum (cinnamon) Yes Firth, 1979
Clarias batrachus (walking catfish) Yes
Crassula helmsii (Australian swamp stonecrop) Yes Cronk and Fuller, 1995
Cuscuta campestris (field dodder) Yes
Cylindropuntia rosea (hudson pear) Yes Deltoro et al., 2014
Cyperus papyrus (papyrus) Yes Yes
Dalbergia sissoo Yes Morton, 2007
Datura ferox (fierce thornapple) Yes Yes Parsons and Cuthbertson, 2001
Datura innoxia (downy thorn apple) Yes
Delonix regia (flamboyant) Yes PIER, 2009
Deparia petersenii subsp. petersenii (Petersen’s lady fern)Locally abundant colonization and spread on stream banks and alluvial deposits. Jacono, pers. obs., Yes
Deroceras laeve (meadow slug)Accidental Yes AnimalBase, 2015
Discus rotundatus (rotund disc)Not explicitly mentioned in literature, but likely based on the species’ biology Yes Yes
Elaeagnus angustifolia (Russian olive) Yes Katz and Shafroth, 2003
Elodea canadensis (Canadian pondweed) Yes
Fallopia japonica (Japanese knotweed)common Yes
Fallopia sachalinensis (giant knotweed) Yes Sukopp and Starfinger, 1995
Flemingia strobilifera (wild hops) Yes
Gambusia holbrooki (eastern mosquitofish)Natural spread once species is established Yes
Globodera pallida (white potato cyst nematode) Yes
Globodera rostochiensis (yellow potato cyst nematode) Yes Been and Schomaker, 2006
Glyceria maxima (reed sweet-grass)Moved in flowing water Yes Yes Parsons and Cuthbertson, 1992
Gymnocoronis spilanthoides (Senegal tea plant)Highly likely Yes Weeds CRC, 2008
Hedychium coronarium (white butterfly ginger lily) Yes
Hedychium flavescens (wild ginger) Yes
Hedychium gardnerianum (kahili ginger) Yes Yes
Hemichromis letourneuxi (African jewelfish)Dispersed in Florida by seasonal flooding and/or natural disasters such as hurricanes Yes Loftus et al., 2006
Hemigrapsus sanguineus (Asian shore crab)E.g. 2011 Tohoku tsunami carried individuals from Japanese coast to Oregon Yes
Hemimysis anomala Yes Dumont, 2006; Stubbington et al., 2008
Heracleum mantegazzianum (giant hogweed) Yes
Herichthys cyanoguttatus (Rio Grande cichlid)Flooding of ornamental fish farms Yes Courtenay and Hensley, 1979; Nico et al., 2015
Heterodera glycines (soybean cyst nematode) Yes
Heterotis niloticus (African bonytongue)Natural Yes
Hibiscus tiliaceus (coast cottonwood) Yes
Hygrophila polysperma (Indian swampweed) Yes DCR, 2003
Hymenachne amplexicaulis (hymenachne)Spread of vegetative fragments through natural and engineered waterways Yes Yes Australian Weeds Committee, 2012
Hypostomus plecostomus (suckermouth catfish)Escape/release from aquaculture ponds Yes Yes Hoover et al., 2014
Ictalurus furcatus (blue catfish)Accidental Yes Mettee et al., 1996
Ictalurus punctatus (channel catfish) Yes Yes
Impatiens glandulifera (Himalayan balsam) Yes Beerling and Perrins, 1993
Impatiens parviflora (small balsam) Yes Trepl, 1984
Jatropha curcas (jatropha) Yes Pitt, 1999
Jatropha gossypiifolia (bellyache bush) Yes
Juncus ensifolius (swordleaf rush) Yes
Lagarosiphon major (African elodea) Yes Australia Natural Heritage Trust, 2003
Lemna perpusilla (duckweed)A. Mikulyuk, Wisconsin Dept. of Natural Resources, USA, personal communcation, 2010 Yes
Lepidium latifolium (perennial pepperweed) Yes
Lepomis cyanellus (green sunfish)Expanded its range to several US states Yes Yes USGS, 2013
Lepomis gibbosus (pumpkinseed) Yes Yes Klaar et al., 2004
Leptochloa fusca (sprangletop) Yes
Leucaena leucocephala (leucaena) Yes
Leuciscus idus (ide) Yes Nico and Fuller, 2008
Limax maximus (leopard slug)Eggs and slugs dispersed in flood debris Yes
Limnocharis flava (yellow bur-head) Yes
Limnoperna fortunei (golden mussel)Alluvial floodplain Paraná River, Argentina Yes Ezcurra et al., 2006
Ludwigia grandiflora (water primrose) Yes Ruaux et al., 2009
Ludwigia peploides (water primrose) Yes Ruaux et al., 2009
Lygodium microphyllum (old world climbing fern) Yes
Lythrum salicaria (purple loosestrife) Yes Yes Thompson et al., 1987
Marisa cornuarietis (giant ramshorn)Potential for dispersal in the advent of a flood, transporting snails throughout waterways Yes
Melaleuca quinquenervia (paperbark tree) Yes PIER, 2007
Melanoides tuberculata (red-rimmed melania) Yes
Mesosphaerum pectinatum (comb bushmint)Accidental Yes Yes
Micropterus dolomieu (smallmouth bass) Yes
Microstegium vimineum (Nepalese browntop)Moderate to high uncertainty Yes Mehrhoff, 2000; Warren et al., 2010
Mimosa diplotricha (giant sensitive plant) Yes Cronk and Fuller, 1995; Parsons and Cuthbertson, 1992
Mononychellus tanajoa (cassava green mite)Accidental introduction, rare pathway Yes
Nandina domestica (Nandina)Possible water dispersal of seed -- plants often found along riparian corridors Yes Stone, 2009
Nasturtium microphyllum (one-row watercress) Yes Cronk and Fuller, 1995
Nicotiana tabacum (tobacco)Tiny and numerous seeds easily dispersed by rainwater and flooding Yes Yes PIER, 2014
Nymphoides peltata (yellow floating-heart) Yes Stuckey, 1973
Opuntia aurantiaca (jointed cactus)Along river systems Yes
Opuntia elatior (red-flower prickly pear) Yes
Opuntia ficus-indica (prickly pear) Yes
Opuntia monacantha (common prickly pear) Yes Yes
Opuntia stricta (erect prickly pear)Spreading seed Yes
Orobanche ramosa (branched broomrape) Yes
Oryza barthii Yes
Paederia foetida (skunkvine) Yes Stocker and Brazis, 1999
Pandanus tectorius (screw pine) Yes Yes
Parthenium hysterophorus (parthenium weed) Yes PAG, 2000
Pennisetum setaceum (fountain grass)Seed dispersal Yes Rahlao et al., 2009
Persicaria perfoliata (mile-a-minute weed) Yes Yes Okay, 1997
Phoenix canariensis (Canary Island date palm) Yes DiTomaso and Healy, 2006
Plectranthus scutellarioides (coleus)Grows by streams; water dispersal likely Yes Flora of China Editorial Committee, 2014
Pomacea canaliculata (golden apple snail)Perhaps important in Asia where large areas are flooded during the wet season Yes
Pomacea maculataSnails or hatchlings could be moved via water flows Yes Yes Martin et al., 2012
Potamogeton crispus (curlyleaf pondweed) Yes ISSG, 2006
Prosopis glandulosa (honey mesquite)Spreading seeds Yes Solbrig and Cantino, 1975
Prosopis juliflora (mesquite)Aids spread Yes Pasiecznik, 2001
Pseudorasbora parva (topmouth gudgeon) Yes Yes Copp et al., 2005a
Pterois volitans (lionfish)USA, Hurricane Andrew. Now thought unlikely to be the main cause of the invasion. Yes Courtenay, 1995
Rhamphicarpa fistulosaPresumably seeds are dispersed through flood water as species occurs in temporary flooded areas (wet Yes
Rhizophora mangle (red mangrove) Yes
Rottboellia cochinchinensis (itch grass) Yes Freshwater et al., 1986
Roystonea oleracea (Caribbean royal palm) Yes
Saccharum ravennae (ravenna grass) Yes
Salix cinerea (grey sallow) Yes Harman, 2004
Salsola kali (common saltwort) Yes
Salsola paulsenii (barbwire Russian thistle) Yes
Salvinia auriculata (giant salvinia) Yes ISSG, 2009
Salvinia minima Yes
Salvinia molesta (Kariba weed) Yes McFarland et al., 2004
Sander vitreus (walleye)See distribution table and list Yes Yes
Schinus terebinthifolius (Brazilian pepper tree)Likely Yes Ferriter and Clark, 1997
Senna septemtrionalis (smooth senna)Mass movement of soil and flood debris Yes West, 2003
Setaria parviflora (knotroot foxtail)Tolerates flooding Yes Mollard et al., 2007
Sicyos angulatus (burcucumber)In South Korea, it initiated colonization and established a population on the riverside Yes Kil et al., 2006
Solanum capsicoides (cockroach berry)Seeds known to float Yes Yes Levin et al., 2005
Solanum erianthum (potato tree)Grows along riverbanks in Taiwan Yes Cronk and Fuller, 1995; Roe, 1979
Solenopsis invicta (red imported fire ant)Raft of ants could float, accidental Yes Taber, 2000
Solenopsis richteri (black imported fire ant) Yes Hays, 1959
Sporisorium pulverulentum (Sporisorium smut of wild Saccharum) Yes
Syzygium cumini (black plum) Yes
Thespesia populnea (portia tree) Yes Yes
Tithonia diversifolia (Tithonia) Yes Yes
Tricellaria inopinataE.g. debris from the 2011 Tohoku tsunami carried individuals from the Japanese coast to Oregon Yes
Typha latifolia (broadleaf cattail) Yes USDA-NRCS, 2010
Ulex europaeus (gorse) Yes Clements et al., 2001
Undaria pinnatifida (Asian kelp)Found attached to Japanese dock debris washed ashore in Oregon, USA after Tohoku tsunami in 2011 Yes
Urochloa distachya (signal grass)Species is tolerant of waterlogged soils Yes Yes
Vigna marina (beach bean) Yes Yes Padulosi and Ng, 1993
Vitex rotundifolia (beach vitex)Coastal storm surges, including hurricanes, along SE coast of USA Yes Yes Cousins et al., 2010a
Xanthium spinosum (bathurst burr) Yes PIER, 2013