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Acentrogobius pflaumii

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Datasheet

Acentrogobius pflaumii

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 13 November 2018
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Invasive Species
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Acentrogobius pflaumii
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Metazoa
  •     Phylum: Chordata
  •       Subphylum: Vertebrata
  •         Class: Actinopterygii
  • Summary of Invasiveness
  • A. pflaumii is a small gobiid that has spread through ports/harbours and estuaries of New Zealand and three Australian states. The gobiid’s cryptic nature has allowed it to become well-established without detecti...

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Pictures

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PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Acentrogobius pflaumii; Bicton, on the Swan River, southwestern Australia. 18th November 2004
TitleAdult
CaptionAcentrogobius pflaumii; Bicton, on the Swan River, southwestern Australia. 18th November 2004
Copyright©Mark Maddern
Acentrogobius pflaumii; Bicton, on the Swan River, southwestern Australia. 18th November 2004
AdultAcentrogobius pflaumii; Bicton, on the Swan River, southwestern Australia. 18th November 2004©Mark Maddern
Acentrogobius pflaumii; Mosman Park, on the Swan River in southwestern Australia. 24th October 2007.
TitleAdult
CaptionAcentrogobius pflaumii; Mosman Park, on the Swan River in southwestern Australia. 24th October 2007.
Copyright©Mark Maddern
Acentrogobius pflaumii; Mosman Park, on the Swan River in southwestern Australia. 24th October 2007.
AdultAcentrogobius pflaumii; Mosman Park, on the Swan River in southwestern Australia. 24th October 2007.©Mark Maddern
Acentrogobius pflaumii; Bicton, on the Swan River, southwestern Australia. 18th November 2004
TitleAdult
CaptionAcentrogobius pflaumii; Bicton, on the Swan River, southwestern Australia. 18th November 2004
Copyright©Mark Maddern
Acentrogobius pflaumii; Bicton, on the Swan River, southwestern Australia. 18th November 2004
AdultAcentrogobius pflaumii; Bicton, on the Swan River, southwestern Australia. 18th November 2004©Mark Maddern
Acentrogobius pflaumii; Rockingham, Cockburn Sound, in southwestern Australia. Note the burrow inhabited by A. pflaumii and also the alepheid shrimp antennae in the burrow entrance.
TitleCommensal
CaptionAcentrogobius pflaumii; Rockingham, Cockburn Sound, in southwestern Australia. Note the burrow inhabited by A. pflaumii and also the alepheid shrimp antennae in the burrow entrance.
Copyright©Mark Maddern
Acentrogobius pflaumii; Rockingham, Cockburn Sound, in southwestern Australia. Note the burrow inhabited by A. pflaumii and also the alepheid shrimp antennae in the burrow entrance.
CommensalAcentrogobius pflaumii; Rockingham, Cockburn Sound, in southwestern Australia. Note the burrow inhabited by A. pflaumii and also the alepheid shrimp antennae in the burrow entrance. ©Mark Maddern
Acentrogobius pflaumii; Mosman Park, on the Swan River in southwestern Australia. 24th October 2007.
TitleAdult in burrow
CaptionAcentrogobius pflaumii; Mosman Park, on the Swan River in southwestern Australia. 24th October 2007.
Copyright©Mark Maddern
Acentrogobius pflaumii; Mosman Park, on the Swan River in southwestern Australia. 24th October 2007.
Adult in burrowAcentrogobius pflaumii; Mosman Park, on the Swan River in southwestern Australia. 24th October 2007.©Mark Maddern
Alepheid shrimp, most likely Alpheus euphrosyne, observed co-habiting burrows with Acentrogobius pflaumii in the Swan River, southwestern Australia.
TitleCommensal
CaptionAlepheid shrimp, most likely Alpheus euphrosyne, observed co-habiting burrows with Acentrogobius pflaumii in the Swan River, southwestern Australia.
Copyright©Mark Maddern
Alepheid shrimp, most likely Alpheus euphrosyne, observed co-habiting burrows with Acentrogobius pflaumii in the Swan River, southwestern Australia.
CommensalAlepheid shrimp, most likely Alpheus euphrosyne, observed co-habiting burrows with Acentrogobius pflaumii in the Swan River, southwestern Australia. ©Mark Maddern
Alepheid shrimp, most likely Alpheus euphrosyne, observed co-habiting burrows with Acentrogobius pflaumii in the Swan River, southwestern Australia.
TitleCommensal
CaptionAlepheid shrimp, most likely Alpheus euphrosyne, observed co-habiting burrows with Acentrogobius pflaumii in the Swan River, southwestern Australia.
Copyright©Mark Maddern
Alepheid shrimp, most likely Alpheus euphrosyne, observed co-habiting burrows with Acentrogobius pflaumii in the Swan River, southwestern Australia.
CommensalAlepheid shrimp, most likely Alpheus euphrosyne, observed co-habiting burrows with Acentrogobius pflaumii in the Swan River, southwestern Australia. ©Mark Maddern

Identity

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Preferred Scientific Name

  • Acentrogobius pflaumii Bleeker, 1853

Other Scientific Names

  • Acanthogobius pflaumi Sokolovskaya et al., 1998
  • Acentrogobius pflaumi Masuda et al., 1984
  • Amoya pflaumi Currie et al., 1998
  • Ctenogobius pflaumi Fowler, 1961
  • Gobius pflaumii Bleeker, 1853
  • Rhinogobius pflaumi Matsubara

Local Common Names

  • Australia: Asian goby; streaked goby; striped goby
  • Finland: täpläkylkitokko
  • Japan: sujihaze
  • New Zealand: Asian goby; streaked goby; striped goby

Summary of Invasiveness

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A. pflaumii is a small gobiid that has spread through ports/harbours and estuaries of New Zealand and three Australian states. The gobiid’s cryptic nature has allowed it to become well-established without detection. It was discovered at the Victoria Docks in Port Phillip Bay, Australia in 1996 and subsequent qualitative surveys in 1996-1997 revealed that A. pflaumii occurred in almost all areas of Port Phillip Bay and also in the lower estuary of the Yarra River. Similarly, after detection in Western Australia in 2004 large populations were discovered in Cockburn Sound and the Swan River estuary. Ballast water emissions from international bulk-cargo vessels, containing eggs and/or fish, are considered the most likely introductory vector. The population increase and spread of A. pflaumii in eastern Australia and New Zealand infer that further range expansions in this region are likely.

Taxonomic Tree

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  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Metazoa
  •         Phylum: Chordata
  •             Subphylum: Vertebrata
  •                 Class: Actinopterygii
  •                     Order: Perciformes
  •                         Suborder: Gobioidei
  •                             Family: Gobiidae
  •                                 Genus: Acentrogobius
  •                                     Species: Acentrogobius pflaumii

Notes on Taxonomy and Nomenclature

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Acentrogobius pflaumii was originally described as Gobius pflaumii (Bleeker, 1853) with the genus Acentrogobius subsequently created by Bleeker (1874). The taxonomic status of species within Acentrogobius and related genera are uncertain (Francis et al., 2003; H Larson, Northern Territory Museum, Australia, personal communication, 2008), though according to Froese and Pauly (2007)Acentrogobius currently contains around 62 members. Confusion also exists on the designation of the species name as either pflaumii and/or pflaumi. The former spelling is observed by Froese and Pauly (2007) and the majority of peer-reviewed literature, though pflaumi is regularly used (e.g. Lockett and Gomon, 2001). In this document it is accepted that the correct spelling is pflaumii. Lockett and Gomon (2001) noted that specimens collected from Port Phillip Bay, Melbourne, Australia had ten second dorsal soft rays as did the syntypes of this species from Nagasaki, although nine rays are described in Masuda et al. (1984). A. pflaumii does not appear to have a generally accepted common name. In Australia/New Zealand it is referred to as the “streaked goby” (e.g. Maddern and Morrison, 2008) or the “Asian goby” (e.g. Francis et al., 2003).

Description

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Adult

A. pflaumii has an elongate, slender body with a moderate-sized head, very narrow interorbital space, eyes almost adjacent, mouth large and oblique, rear end of jaws below middle of eyes, teeth conical and gill openings restricted to pectoral fin bases (NIMPIS, 2002). There are scales on the top of the head from two-thirds of the distance from the dorsal fin origin to the eyes, and these are organised in approximately 8-10 rows. There are no scales on the operculum or cheek, and body scales are cycloid and in 25-27 rows with 8-10 predorsal scales (NIMPIS, 2002). Two dorsal fins; the first is short and rounded and originates behind the ventral fin insertions; the second is much longer than the first and originates just behind the first fin and terminates near the caudal peduncle. Lockett and Gomon (2001) noted that specimens collected from Port Phillip Bay, Australia had ten second dorsal soft rays as did the syntypes of this species from Nagasaki, although nine rays are described in Masuda et al. (1984). Ventral fins fused to form cup-shaped disc and originate below and behind pectoral fin insertions. The anal fin has ten segmented rays (Masuda et al., 1984). Colouration is pale-grey to brown, with five black, mid-lateral blotches with the last blotch, positioned on the caudal peduncle, darker and more distinctive than those on the body. Sides have four to six narrow, brown horizontal lines extending the length of the body and electric blue spots at the centre of some lateral scales. The head has a black spot or band extending from the front of the eye down to the rear of the upper jaw, and a short, black horizontal stripe behind the eye (NIMPIS, 2002). The fins are mostly transparent although the dorsal and pectoral fins may be faintly speckled orange (M Maddern, University of Western Australia, personal observation, 2008). Maximum length recorded as 96 mm (Masuda et al., 1975) or 120 mm (Froese and Pauly, 2007); introduced fish have been recorded at 60-80 mm (Lockett and Gomon, 2001; Francis et al., 2003; Maddern and Morrison, 2008).

Larvae

The larvae are pelagic and internal pigment is visible on the dorsal surface of the hindgut and the gas bladder. The larvae are also distinguishable by a melanophore at the tip of the lower jaw, and in larger larvae the presence of numerous melanophores on the gular region (NIMPIS, 2002).

Distribution

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A. pflaumii has been collected in Waitemata and Whangapoua Harbours in northeastern New Zealand (Francis et al., 2003). In Australia, it has been recorded in Botany Bay and Sydney Harbour in New South Wales (Francis et al., 2003; Rowe et al., 2008), and from Port Phillip Bay and the lower reaches of the Yarra River estuary in Victoria (Lockett and Gomon, 2001). In Western Australia, it has been collected in Cockburn Sound and the Swan River Estuary (Mead-Hunter, 2004; Maddern and Morrison, 2008).

Distribution Table

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The distribution in this summary table is based on all the information available. When several references are cited, they may give conflicting information on the status. Further details may be available for individual references in the Distribution Table Details section which can be selected by going to Generate Report.

Continent/Country/RegionDistributionLast ReportedOriginFirst ReportedInvasiveReferenceNotes

Sea Areas

Pacific, NorthwestWidespreadNative Not invasive NIMPIS, 2002; Froese and Pauly, 2007
Pacific, Western CentralWidespreadNative Not invasive NIMPIS, 2002; Froese and Pauly, 2007

Asia

ChinaPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-ShandongPresentNative Not invasive Rhodes, 1998As Gobius pflaumi
JapanPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-HonshuPresentNativeMasuda et al., 1984; Horinouchi and Sano, 2001; Kanou et al., 2004
Korea, DPRPresentNative Not invasive Froese and Pauly, 2007
Korea, Republic ofPresentNative Not invasive Froese and Pauly, 2007
PhilippinesPresentNative Not invasive Fowler, 1961; Masuda et al., 1984
TaiwanPresentNative Not invasive Shao et al., 1993; Froese and Pauly, 2007

Europe

Russian FederationPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-Russian Far EastPresentNative Not invasive Sokolovskaya et al., 1998As Acanthogobius pflaumi, reference considered unreliable (Rowe et al., 2008)

Oceania

AustraliaPresentPresent based on regional distribution.
-New South WalesPresentIntroducedNIMPIS, 2002; Francis et al., 2003Present in Botany Bay and Sydney Harbour
-VictoriaPresentIntroduced Invasive Lockett and Goman, 2001Present in wider Port Phillip Bay and Yarra River estuary
-Western AustraliaPresentIntroduced Invasive Mead-Hunter, 2004; Maddern and Morrison, 2008Present in Swan River estuary and Cockburn Sound
New ZealandPresentIntroducedFrancis et al., 2003

History of Introduction and Spread

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A. pflaumii was collected in Waitemata and Whangapoua Harbours in northeastern New Zealand in 2001-2002, and at this time had a restricted distribution within these harbours (Francis et al., 2003). In Australia, it has been recorded in Botany Bay and Sydney Harbour in New South Wales prior to 2003 (Francis et al., 2003; Rowe et al., 2008), although no information is available on the species distribution or when it was first observed within these harbours. In Victoria, A. pflaumii was first recorded in Australia in 1996 at the Victoria Docks in Port Phillip Bay (Lockett and Gomon, 2001). Qualitative surveys undertaken throughout Port Phillip Bay in 1996-1997 revealed that A. pflaumii occurred in almost all areas of the bay and also in the lower estuary of the Yarra River (Hamer et al., 1998). A. pflaumii was first reported in southwestern Australia from a single location in Cockburn Sound in 2004 (Mead-Hunter, 2004). It was reported from the Swan River estuary in southwestern Australia in 2004/2005 (Maddern and Morrison, 2008), although the species had been observed in these localities from at least 2000 (M Maddern, University of Western Australia, personal observation, 2008).

Introductions

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Introduced toIntroduced fromYearReasonIntroduced byEstablished in wild throughReferencesNotes
Natural reproductionContinuous restocking
New South Wales pre-2003 Yes Francis et al. (2003) Accidental introduction
New Zealand 2001-2002 Yes Francis et al. (2003) Accidental introduction
Victoria 1996 Yes Lockett and Goman (2001) Accidental introduction
Western Australia 2004 Yes Maddern and Morrison (2008); Mead-Hunter (2004) Accidental introduction, observed prior to 2004 (M Maddern, The University of Western Australia, personal observation, 2008)

Risk of Introduction

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The risk of A. pflaumii being introduced and establishing further non-indigenous populations is high. Ballast water emissions from international bulk-cargo vessels have proven effective at translocating small, cryptic gobiids (Wonham et al., 2000) including A. pflaumii (Lockett and Gomon, 2001; Francis et al., 2003). The spread of A. pflaumii in Australia and New Zealand indicates that upon introduction to suitable habitats, it can produce large populations quickly. Furthermore, based on past experiences in Australia (Victoria and Western Australia), detection of A. pflaumii is difficult if it, or at least small, cryptic, benthic fishes, are not specifically targeted or incorrect sampling techniques are used.

Habitat

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Within its native range, A. pflaumii occurs on soft substrata, sand and seagrass beds (Zostera spp.) in brackish estuarine waters and coastal embayments (Matsumiya et al., 1980; Kanou et al., 2004). Zostera spp. habitats are favoured by juveniles; for example Horinouchi and Sano (2001) observed A. pflaumii recruits occupying Zostera seagrass beds in Japan, and tested the effect of changes in substrate structural complexity on juvenile habitat preference and found no correlation. These authors speculated that observed juvenile densities might be determined by other factors, most notably prey availability. In contrast, the adults typically occupy open substrata.

Similar habitats are occupied by introduced populations in Australia and New Zealand. In New Zealand, A. pflaumii was collected in very shallow mud/silt substrates (i.e. by hand seine net with a drop of 1 metre) in inner harbours; some specimens were collected adjacent to Zostera capricornia beds (Francis et al., 2003). In the Yarra River estuary and Port Phillip Bay in Victoria, A. pflaumii occupies soft sediment habitats over 5 metres deep and was much rarer in shallower water (Hamer et al., 1998). The species was recorded in suitable habitats in all areas of the bay except the entrance channel (Lockett and Gomon, 2001).

In Western Australia, A. pflaumii was observed only on open, soft/silt substrata in water from 5 to 22 metres deep (Maddern and Morrison, 2008). It was not recorded on coarser, sand substrata, a preference also noted by NIMPIS (2002). Within this habitat it occupied burrows (Maddern and Morrison, 2008), a characteristic that has also been observed by Francis et al. (2003) in New Zealand and in Cockburn Sound, Western Australia (Mead-Hunter, 2004).

Habitat List

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CategorySub-CategoryHabitatPresenceStatus
Brackish
 
Estuaries Principal habitat Natural
Estuaries Principal habitat Productive/non-natural
Lagoons Principal habitat Natural
Lagoons Principal habitat Productive/non-natural
Marine
 
Inshore marine Principal habitat Natural
Inshore marine Principal habitat Productive/non-natural

Biology and Ecology

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Genetics

The A. pflaumii diploid/haploid chromosome numbers are 50-50/25 (Froese and Pauly, 2007). See Thacker (2009) for a discussion on the molecular phylogeny of this species.

Reproductive Biology

A. pflaumii reproduces during the summer; both indigenous populations in Japan (Horinouchi and Sano, 2001) and Korea (from May to June) (Baeck et al., 2004), and introduced populations in Port Phillip Bay, Australia (NIMPIS, 2002). The eggs are often laid under dead shells (Masuda et al., 1975). The larvae are 5 – 8 mm and planktonic (Kanou et al., 2004), and the larval stage lasts approximately 30 days (Locket and Gomon, 1999). New recruits, at a mean size of 22 mm, then settle on Zostera spp. seagrass beds in autumn (Horinouchi and Sano, 2001). However, NIMPIS (2002) considers the size of recruits at settlement to be approximately 10 mm. Densities of juvenile A. pflaumii in Zostera spp. seagrass beds average one to two fish per square metre (Horinouchi and Sano, 2001). A. pflaumii matures during the first year of life in Japan (Horinouchi and Sano, 2001), and fish from Korea reproduce at approximately 4 cm (Baeck et al., 2004). Fecundity in Korean fish was size-dependent at between 3,600 and 9,700, and the proportion of female fish increased with size; i.e. 60% of all fish were female, and 100% of fish over 55 mm were female (Baeck et al., 2004).

Nutrition

A. pflaumii larvae (5 – 8 mm long) consume primarily zooplankton and copepods (Kanou et al., 2004). Benthic juveniles in Zostera spp. seagrass beds and tidal mudflats consume mainly harpacticoid copepods and gammarid amphipods (Matsumiya et al., 1980; Horinouchi and Sano, 2001; Kanou et al., 2004). The adults (about 50 mm) feed mainly on gammaridean amphipods (Matsumiya et al., 1980) and also consume mollusca, polychaetes and isopods (Kikuchi and Yamashita, 1992 in NIMPIS, 2002; Horinouchi and Sano, 2000).

Associations

In southwestern Australia, A. pflaumii co-habited burrows with alpheid shrimps. A. pflaumii was observed near the burrow entrance, while the burrow was excavated by the shrimp (Mead-Hunter, 2004; Maddern and Morrison, 2008). The shrimp is most likely Alpheus euphrosyne, which is the most abundant alepheid shrimp found in shallow water in southern Australia (Edgar, 2000). The occupation of burrows has been noted by Francis et al. (2003) in New Zealand, although the co-habitation of burrows with alepheid shrimps has been observed only in Western Australia. It is unknown if these behaviours are widespread or occur only in introduced populations and/or particular environments. However, as commented by Maddern and Morrison (2008), these behavioural characteristics may be observed only by scuba divers in situ, therefore it follows that they will only be recorded by studies utilising this sampling methodology.

Environmental Requirements

Almost no definitive data is available on the environmental tolerances of A. pflaumii. The wide geographic distribution of native and introduced populations indicates a wide temperature tolerance (from tropical/subtropical to temperate regions). Takizawa (1994) records a minimum temperature of 8°C. The water temperature in the Swan River estuary in southwestern Australia, where A. pflaumii was collected (Maddern and Morrison, 2008), varies seasonally between 13 and 24°C (M Maddern, University of Western Australia, personal observation, 2008). Notable also is that A. pflaumii will tolerate salinities from seawater to brackish water of lower estuaries (e.g. Lockett and Gomon, 2001; Maddern and Morrison, 2008). Uchida and Dotsu (1980 in NIMPIS, 2002) cite minimum (26°C) and maximum (28°C) temperatures for reproduction in captive-reared fish.

Water Tolerances

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ParameterMinimum ValueMaximum ValueTypical ValueStatusLife StageNotes
Water temperature (ºC temperature) Optimum Minimum 8 tolerated (Takizawa, 1994)

Natural enemies

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Natural enemyTypeLife stagesSpecificityReferencesBiological control inBiological control on
Asterorhombus intermedius Predator to species Manabe and Shinomiya, 1998
Cynoglossus semilaevis Predator Froese and Pauly, 2007
Sillago japonica Predator Froese and Pauly, 2007
Sphyraena pinguis Predator Froese and Pauly, 2007

Notes on Natural Enemies

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The bothid flounder, Asterorhombus intermedius, preyed upon A. pflaumii in Japan (Manabe and Shinomiya, 1998), and Froese and Pauly (2007) list Cynoglossus semilaevis (China), Sillago japonica and Sphyraena pinguis (North Korea) as predators.

Means of Movement and Dispersal

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Natural Dispersal (Non-Biotic)


Natural dispersal of A. pflaumii is most likely to occur during the planktonic larval stage. The adults are benthic and sedentary, and are therefore less likely to travel large distances unaided. Water currents/tidal regimes may assist the dispersal of the larvae and adults.

Vector Transmission (Biotic)


No information is available on the biotic vector transmission of A. pflaumii.

Accidental Introduction


It is considered likely that A. pflaumii was introduced to Australia and New Zealand by the release of ballast water from international bulk-cargo vessels (Lockett and Gomon, 2001; Francis et al., 2003; Maddern and Morrison, 2008). Furthermore, most if not all areas where the species has been collected are close to international ports. For example, the sites in the lower Swan River estuary in Western Australia are within several kilometres of the international port of Fremantle (Maddern and Morrison, 2008). The release of ballast water from international bulk-cargo vessels containing eggs, post-larval or adult fishes is considered the main introductory vector for small, cryptic species from the families Gobiidae, Blenniidae and Eleotridae (Carlton, 1985; Wonham et al., 2000; Hewitt et al., 2004; Hayes et al., 2005). Furthermore, Wonham et al. (2000) identified gobiids as the family of fishes most commonly found in ballast water, and also the most successfully established fishes from ballast water-mediated introductions.

Intentional Introduction


Little information is available on the intentional introduction of A. pflaumii. However, NIMPIS (2002) lists fishery related activities (e.g. discarded bait, release from translocated oysters) as possible vectors.

Impact Summary

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CategoryImpact
Economic/livelihood Positive
Environment (generally) Negative

Economic Impact

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Froese and Pauly (2007) list fisheries as a positive economic use of this species and the price category as ‘high’. No further information is available.

Environmental Impact

Top of page Impact on Biodiversity

A. pflaumii
is carnivorous, as are many gobiids, and thus there is the potential for it to compete for food resources with indigenous gobiids (NIMPIS, 2002). Kanou et al. (2004) noted a trophic guild comprising A. pflaumii and sympatric gobiids including Acanthogobius spp., Gymnogobius spp. and Tridentiger obscurus. Thus, the potential exists for resource competition to occur with endemic gobiids and other ichthyofauna.


No definitive impacts on biodiversity/fauna have been reported in the habitats where A. pflaumii has been introduced (Lockett and Gomon, 2001; NIMPIS, 2002; Francis et al., 2003; Maddern and Morrison, 2008; Rowe et al., 2008). However, non-indigenous A. pflaumii populations have been known only for about 10 years and little or no research has been conducted on the potential impacts of A. pflaumii upon introduction. Even so, some general observations can be made.


In an Australian context, gobiids are one of the dominant ichthyofaunal families of temperate Australian estuaries (Potter and Hyndes, 1999), and show distinct spatial segregation patterns in the Swan River estuary based on salinity tolerance, habitat, substrate and dietary preferences (Gill and Potter, 1993). In the Swan River estuary, A. pflaumii was the only gobiid observed occupying open silt substrata in water deeper than 5 metres (Maddern and Morrison, 2008). In past surveys, these areas had been occupied by the native gobiid Arenigobius bifrenatus (Hutchins and Thompson, 1983; Gill and Potter, 1993) although this species was not observed by Maddern and Morrison (2008). Otter trawls conducted by Gill and Potter (1993) in deeper areas of the Swan River estuary recorded few gobiids although the majority (i.e. about90%) were A. bifrenatus. Furthermore, in New Zealand harbours, Francis et al.(2003) noted that both introduced A. bifrentatus and A. pflaumii occupied similar habitats, although they were not recordedin close proximity nor collected in the same seine-net tow. Thus, while it is unknown if A. bifrenatus has occurred or still occurs in the exact areas where A. pflaumii now thrives in the Swan River estuary, it was not observed from 2004 to 2006 (Maddern and Morrison, 2008). As noted, both gobiids occupy similar benthic environments and there is the potential for competition for habitat and/or resources to occur between the introduced A. pflaumii and the native A. bifrenatus and possibly other native gobiids (Maddern and Morrison, 2008).


Hybridisation between A. pflaumii and indigenous gobies is possible and the likelihood of this occurring was defined by Rowe et al. (2008) as “medium risk”. This status acknowledges that there are numbers of fairly closely related indigenous gobiids (e.g. others from the genera Acentrogobius and Arenigobius, including A. bifrenatus) with which hybridisation is possible.


Finally, in two of the Australian habitats where A. pflaumii is now found, i.e. Port Phillip Bay in Victoria (Lockett and Gomon, 2001), and the Swan River estuary in southwestern Australia (Maddern and Morrison, 2008), the species is very common and may numerically dominate these habitats. Thus, when these high populations are considered, as well as the points listed above, it is highly likely that A. pflaumii is influencing the ecology of these areas.

Social Impact

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No social impacts have been reported for A. pflaumii.

Risk and Impact Factors

Top of page Invasiveness
  • Proved invasive outside its native range
  • Has a broad native range
  • Abundant in its native range
  • Capable of securing and ingesting a wide range of food
  • Fast growing
  • Has high reproductive potential
  • Gregarious
Impact outcomes
  • Modification of natural benthic communities
Likelihood of entry/control
  • Highly likely to be transported internationally accidentally
  • Difficult to identify/detect as a commodity contaminant
  • Difficult to identify/detect in the field
  • Difficult/costly to control

Uses

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Froese and Pauly (2007) list fisheries as a positive economic use of this species.

Detection and Inspection

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Small, cryptic species are, by their very nature, difficult to observe and quantify. As noted by Maddern and Morrison (2008), the ichthyofauna of the Swan River estuary has been regularly surveyed and described for at least three decades (e.g. Chubb et al., 1979; Hutchins and Thompson, 1983; Loneragan et al., 1989; Gill and Potter, 1993; Potter and Hyndes, 1999; Hoeksema and Potter, 2006) although A. pflaumii was not recorded. The techniques utilised for these surveys, mostly seine and gill nets in shallow areas (e.g. Gill and Potter, 1993; Hoeksema and Potter, 2006), and otter trawls in deeper areas (e.g. Potter and Hyndes, 1999), were inappropriate for the collection of small, cryptic fishes. Such fishes are commonly surveyed by visual censuses (e.g. Wickett and Corkum, 1998; Ray and Corkum, 2001; Johnson et al., 2005;Sapota and Skóra, 2005), and unless surveys utilising such methodologies are undertaken, cryptic species may remain undetected. Furthermore, as noted by Maddern and Morrison (2008), the behavioural characteristics of A. pflaumii in southwestern Australia (i.e. occupying burrows with alepheid shrimps) would only have been observed by scuba divers in situ, and thus would only have been recorded by studies utilising this sampling methodology.

Similarities to Other Species/Conditions

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In an Australian/New Zealand context, A. pflaumii most closely resembles Arenigobius bifrentatus. Arenigobius does not have scales on the head in advance of the dorsal fin (NIMPIS, 2002), and A. bifrentatus has different colouration, most notably angled stripes or small blotches rather than the mid-lateral blotches and iridescent blue lateral scales of A. pflaumii (Lockett and Gomon, 1999). McDowall (1996) provides a key to the identification of other endemic Australian gobies with which the streaked goby may be confused. It is important to note that as mentioned above the taxonomic status of species within Acentrogobius and related genera, including Arenigobius, are uncertain (Francis et al., 2003; H Larson, Northern Territory Museum, Australia, personal communication, 2008). Arenigobius is considered a valid genus by some researchers (e.g. Francis et al., 2003), whereas Froese and Pauly (2007) have subsumed Arenigobius into Acentrogobius.

Prevention and Control

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Due to the variable regulations around (de)registration of pesticides, your national list of registered pesticides or relevant authority should be consulted to determine which products are legally allowed for use in your country when considering chemical control. Pesticides should always be used in a lawful manner, consistent with the product's label.

Prevention

Public awareness

There is little public awareness of A. pflaumii, although review papers, such as Rowe et al. (2008) are available for public comment and will inform a wider (though admittedly mostly scientific) audience.

Eradication

There is no information on eradication/control attempts of A. pflaumii in Australia or New Zealand.

Gaps in Knowledge/Research Needs

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There are many knowledge gaps/research priorities: as noted in previous sections, no research has been conducted on the potential ecological impacts of A. pflaumii in Australia or New Zealand.

References

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Baeck GW; Kim JW; Huh S, 2004. Maturation and spawning of striped goby (Acentrogobius pflaumi) (Teleostei: Gobiidae) collected in the Gwangyang Bay, Korea. Journal of the Korean Fisheries Society, 37:226-231.

Bleeker P, 1853. [English title not available]. (Nalezingen op de ichthyologie van Japan) Verhandelingen van het Bataviaasch Genootschap van Kunsten en Wettenschappen, 25:1-56.

Bleeker P, 1874. [English title not available]. (Esquisse d'un système naturel des Gobioïdes) Archives Neerlandais de Sciences Naturelles,Haarlem, 9:289-331.

Carlton JT, 1985. Transoceanic and interoceanic dispersal of coastal marine organisms: the biology of ballast water. Oceanography and Marine Biology. Oceanography and Marine Biology. An Annual Review, 23:313-371.

Chubb CF; Hutchins JB; Lenanton RCJ; Potter IC, 1979. An annotated checklist of the fishes of the Swan-Avon river system, Western Australia. Records of the Western Australia Museum, 8:1-53.

Currie DR; McArthur MA; Cohen BF, 1998. Exotic marine pests in the Port of Geelong, Victoria, Report No. 8. Queenscliff, Victoria, Australia: Marine and Freshwater Resources Institute.

Edgar GJ, 2000. Australian Marine Life: The Plants and Animals of Temperate Waters. Sydney, Australia: New Holland Publishers, Ltd., 528 pp.

Fowler HW, 1961. A synopsis of the fishes of China, part IX: the gobioid fishes. Quarterly Journal of the Taiwan Museum, 13:91-280.

Francis MP; Cameron W; Morrison MA; Middleton C, 2003. Invasion of the Asian goby, Acentrogobius pflaumii, into New Zealand, with new locality records of the introduced bridled goby, Arenigobius bifrenatus. New Zealand Journal of Marine and Freshwater Research, 37:105-112.

Froese R; Pauly D, 2007. FishBase. http://www.fishbase.org

Gill HS; Potter IC, 1993. Spatial segregation amongst goby species within an Australian estuary, with a comparison of the diets and salinity tolerance of the two most abundant species. Marine Biology, 117:515-526.

Hamer P; Jenkins G; Welsford D, 1998. Sampling of Newly-Settled Snapper, Pagrus auratus, and Identification of Preferred Habitats in Port Phillip Bay - A Pilot Study. Queenscliff, Australia: Marine and Freshwater Resources Institute.

Hayes K; Sliwa C; Migus S; McEnnulty F; Dunstan P, 2005. National Priority Pests: Part II, Ranking of Australian marine pests. Canberra, Australia: CSIRO Marine Research, Department of Environment and Heritage, 106 p. http://www.marine.csiro.au/crimp/reports/PriorityPestsFinalreport.pdf

Hewitt CL; Campbell ML; Thresher RE; Martin RB; Boyd S; Cohen BF; Currie DR; Gomon MF; Keough MJ; Lewis JA; Lockett MM; Mays N; McArthur MA; O'Hara TD; Poore GCB; Ross J; Storey MJ; Watson JE; Wilson RS, 2004. Introduced and cryptogenic species in Port Phillip Bay, Victoria, Australia. Marine Biology, 144:183-202.

Hoeksema SD; Potter IC, 2006. Diel, seasonal, regional and annual variations in the characteristics of the ichthyofauna of the upper reaches of a large Australian microtidal estuary. Estuarine,Coastal and Shelf Science, 67:503-520.

Horinouchi M; Sano M, 2000. Food habits of fishes in a Zostera marina bed at Aburatsubo, central Japan. Ichthyological Research, 47(2):163-173.

Horinouchi M; Sano M, 2001. Effects of changes in seagrass shoot density and leaf height on the abundance of juveniles of Acentrogobius pflaumii in a Zostera marina bed. Ichthyological Research, 48:179-185.

Hutchins JB; Thompson M, 1983. The Marine and Estuarine Fishes of South-Western Australia. Perth, Australia: The Western Australian Museum.

Johnson TB; Allen M; Corkum LD; Lee VA, 2005. Comparison of methods need to estimate population size of round gobies (Neogobius melanosomus) in Western Lake Erie. Journal of Great Lakes Research, 31:78-86.

Kanou K; Sano M; Kohno H, 2004. Food habits of fishes on unvegetated tidal mudflats in Tokyo Bay, central Japan. Fish. Sci, 70(6):978-987.

Kikuchi T; Yamashita Y, 1992. Seasonal occurrence of gobiid fish and their food habits in a small mud flat in Amakusa. Publications from the Amakusa Marine Biological Laboratory Kyushu University, 11(2):73-93.

Lockett MM; Goman MF, 1999. Occurrence and distribution of exotic fishes in Port Phillip Bay. Marine Biological Invasions of Port Phillip Bay, Victoria [ed. by Hewitt , CL, Campbell , ML, Thresher , RE, and Martin , RB]. Hobart, Australia: CSIRO Marine Research.

Lockett MM; Goman MF, 2001. Ship Mediated Fish Invasions in Australia: Two New Introductions and A Consideration of Two Previous Invasions. Biological Invasions, 3(2).

Loneragan NR; Potter IC; Lenanton RCJ, 1989. Influence of site, season and year on the contributions made by marine, estuarine, diadromous and freshwater species to the fish fauna of a temperate Australian Estuary. Marine Biology, 103:461-479.

Maddern MG; Morrison S, 2008. Introduction of the streaked goby Acentrogobius pflaumii (Bleeker 1853) (Pisces: Gobiidae) into southwestern Australia. Australian Zoologist, 34(4).

Manabe H; Shinomiya A, 1998. Use of the first dorsal fin ray as a lure by the bothid flounder Asterorhombus intermedius. Japanese Journal of Ecology, 48(2):117-121.

Masuda H; Amaoka K; Araga C; Uyeno T; Yoshino T, 1984. The fishes of the Japanese Archipelago. Vol. 1. Tokyo, Japan: Tokai University Press, 437 pp.

Masuda H; Araga C; Yoshino T, 1975. Coastal fishes of southern Japan. Tokyo, Japan: Tokai University Press.

Matsumiya Y; Murakami T; Suzuki T; Oka M, 1980. Some ecological observations on gobies, Sagamia geneionema and Rhinogobius pflaumi in Shijiki Bay. Bulletin of the Seikai Regional Fisheries Research Laboratory, 54:321-332.

McDowall RM, 1996. Freshwater Fishes of South-eastern Australia. Sydney, Australia: Reed.

Mead-Hunter D, 2004. Another introduced fish species for Western Australian waters. The Western Australian Naturalist, 24(3):204.

NIMPIS, 2002. Acentrogobius pflaumi species summary. National Introduced Marine Pest Information System [ed. by Hewitt CL, Martin RB, Sliwa C, McEnnulty FR, Murphy NE, Jones T, Cooper]. http://crimp.marine.csiro.au/nimpis

Potter IC; Hyndes GA, 1999. Characteristics of the ichthyofaunas of southwestern Australian estuaries, including comparisons with holarctic estuaries elsewhere in temperate Australia: A review. Australian Journal of Ecology, 24:395-421.

Ray WJ; Corkum LD, 2001. Habitat and site affinity of the round goby. Journal of Great Lakes Research, 27:329-334.

Rhodes KL, 1998. Seasonal trends in epibenthic fish assemblages in the near-shore waters of the western Yellow Sea, Qingdao, People's Republic of China. Estuarine,Coastal and Shelf Science, 46:629-643.

Rowe DK; Moore A; Giorgetti A; Maclean C; Grace P; Wadhwa S; Cooke J, 2008. Review of the impacts of gambusia, redfin perch, tench, roach, yellowfin goby and streaked goby in Australia. Canberra, Australia: Australian Government Department of the Environment, Water, Heritage and the Arts.

Sapota MR; Skóra KE, 2005. Spread of alien (non-indigenous) fish species Neogobius melanstomus in the Gulf of Gdansk (south Baltic). Biological Invasions, 7:157-164.

Shao KT; Chen JP; Kao PH; Wu CY, 1993. Fish fauna and their geographical distribution along the western coast of Taiwan. Acta Zoologica Taiwanica, 4(2):113-140.

Sokolovskaya TG; Sokolovskii AS; Sobolevskii EI, 1998. A list of fishes of Peter the Great Bay (the Sea of Japan). Journal of Ichthyology, 38(1):1-11.

Takizawa K, 1994. Seasonal change in fish communities of a mud flat area at the mouth of the Kutanabe-gawa Brook, Yamaguchi. Journal of Shimonoseki University of Fisheries, 42:101-108.

Thacker CE, 2009. Phylogeny of Gobioidei and placement within Acanthomorpha, with a new classification and investigation of diversification and character evolution. Copeia, 2009(1):93-104.

Uchida T; Dotsu Y, 1980. Larvae and juveniles of three Japanese common gobiid fishes reared in vessels. Bulletin of the Faculty of Fisheries, Nagasaki University, 49:25-33.

Wickett RG; Corkum LD, 1998. You have to get wet: A case study of the nonindigenous great lakes fish, round goby. Fisheries, 23:26-27.

Wonham MJ; Carlton JT; Ruiz GM; Smith LD, 2000. Fish and ships: relating dispersal frequency to success in biological invasions. Mar. Biol, 136(6):1111-1121.

Links to Websites

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WebsiteURLComment
National Introduced Marine Pest Information System (NIMPIS)http://www.marine.csiro.au

Organizations

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Australia: Fishes: Australian Museum Fish Site, Australian Museum Fish Section Division of Vertebrate Zoology 6 College Street, Sydney NSW 2010, http://www.austmus.gov.au/fishes/about/research/hoese1.htm

Contributors

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31/07/08 Original text by:

Mark Maddern, University of Western Australia, Australia

Distribution Maps

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