Invasive Species Compendium

Detailed coverage of invasive species threatening livelihoods and the environment worldwide

Datasheet

Brassica oleracea var. capitata
(cabbage)

Toolbox

Datasheet

Brassica oleracea var. capitata (cabbage)

Summary

  • Last modified
  • 28 November 2017
  • Datasheet Type(s)
  • Host Plant
  • Preferred Scientific Name
  • Brassica oleracea var. capitata
  • Preferred Common Name
  • cabbage
  • Taxonomic Tree
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •   Kingdom: Plantae
  •     Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •       Subphylum: Angiospermae
  •         Class: Dicotyledonae
  • Uses List
  • Fodder/animal feed
  • Traditional/folklore
  • Vegetable

Don't need the entire report?

Generate a print friendly version containing only the sections you need.

Generate report

Pictures

Top of page
PictureTitleCaptionCopyright
Cabbage grown as field crop.|Mature Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var.) grown as field crop.
TitleMature Cabbage
CaptionCabbage grown as field crop.|Mature Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var.) grown as field crop.
CopyrightAgrEvo
Cabbage grown as field crop.|Mature Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var.) grown as field crop.
Mature CabbageCabbage grown as field crop.|Mature Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var.) grown as field crop.AgrEvo
Cabbage grown as field crop.|Mature Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var.) in field crop.
TitleMature Cabbage
CaptionCabbage grown as field crop.|Mature Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var.) in field crop.
CopyrightAgrEvo
Cabbage grown as field crop.|Mature Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var.) in field crop.
Mature CabbageCabbage grown as field crop.|Mature Cabbage (Brassica oleracea var.) in field crop.AgrEvo
A cabbage plant is a large bud that forms into a head consisting of overlapping leaves surrounded by a rosette of outer leaves positioned closer to the ground.
TitlePlants in field
CaptionA cabbage plant is a large bud that forms into a head consisting of overlapping leaves surrounded by a rosette of outer leaves positioned closer to the ground.
Copyright©Gregory E. Welbaum
A cabbage plant is a large bud that forms into a head consisting of overlapping leaves surrounded by a rosette of outer leaves positioned closer to the ground.
Plants in fieldA cabbage plant is a large bud that forms into a head consisting of overlapping leaves surrounded by a rosette of outer leaves positioned closer to the ground.©Gregory E. Welbaum
This cabbage field was established by transplanting on raised beds and furrow irrigated.
TitleField crop
CaptionThis cabbage field was established by transplanting on raised beds and furrow irrigated.
Copyright©Gregory E. Welbaum
This cabbage field was established by transplanting on raised beds and furrow irrigated.
Field cropThis cabbage field was established by transplanting on raised beds and furrow irrigated.©Gregory E. Welbaum
Hinova is a storage cultivar. These heads were stored for 5 months at 2°C and 90% RH. The outer leaves of the two heads on the right have dried out and become discoloured during storage. Removing the outer leaves has restored a marketable appearance to the two heads on the left. Cabbage is stored primarily for processing or is retailed when fresh market cabbage is unavailable.
Titlevar. Hinova
CaptionHinova is a storage cultivar. These heads were stored for 5 months at 2°C and 90% RH. The outer leaves of the two heads on the right have dried out and become discoloured during storage. Removing the outer leaves has restored a marketable appearance to the two heads on the left. Cabbage is stored primarily for processing or is retailed when fresh market cabbage is unavailable.
Copyright©Gregory E. Welbaum
Hinova is a storage cultivar. These heads were stored for 5 months at 2°C and 90% RH. The outer leaves of the two heads on the right have dried out and become discoloured during storage. Removing the outer leaves has restored a marketable appearance to the two heads on the left. Cabbage is stored primarily for processing or is retailed when fresh market cabbage is unavailable.
var. HinovaHinova is a storage cultivar. These heads were stored for 5 months at 2°C and 90% RH. The outer leaves of the two heads on the right have dried out and become discoloured during storage. Removing the outer leaves has restored a marketable appearance to the two heads on the left. Cabbage is stored primarily for processing or is retailed when fresh market cabbage is unavailable.©Gregory E. Welbaum
The green colour is lost during storage. These are high quality heads because of their short core, density and tender texture.
Titlevar. Hinova
CaptionThe green colour is lost during storage. These are high quality heads because of their short core, density and tender texture.
Copyright©Gregory E. Welbaum
The green colour is lost during storage. These are high quality heads because of their short core, density and tender texture.
var. HinovaThe green colour is lost during storage. These are high quality heads because of their short core, density and tender texture.©Gregory E. Welbaum

Identity

Top of page

Preferred Scientific Name

  • Brassica oleracea var. capitata

Preferred Common Name

  • cabbage

Other Scientific Names

  • Brassica oleracea Group Capitata

International Common Names

  • English: cabbages; European cabbage; head cabbage; oxheart cabbage; white cabbage
  • Spanish: col blanca; col repollo; repollo; repollo blanco
  • French: chou blanc; chou cabus blanc; chou pointu; chou pommé
  • Chinese: kan lan
  • Portuguese: couve-repolhuda; repolho-branco

Local Common Names

  • Germany: Kopf- Kohl; Kopfkohl; Spitz- Kohl; Spitzkohl; Weiss- Kohl; Weisskohl
  • Italy: cavolo bianco; cavolo cappucio
  • Japan: kiyabetsu
  • Netherlands: spitskool
  • Sweden: spetskaal; vitkaal

Taxonomic Tree

Top of page
  • Domain: Eukaryota
  •     Kingdom: Plantae
  •         Phylum: Spermatophyta
  •             Subphylum: Angiospermae
  •                 Class: Dicotyledonae
  •                     Order: Capparidales
  •                         Family: Brassicaceae
  •                             Genus: Brassica
  •                                 Species: Brassica oleracea var. capitata

List of Pests

Top of page

Major host of:

Achatina fulica (giant African land snail); Agrotis exclamationis (moth, heart and dart); Agrotis segetum (turnip moth); Albugo candida (white rust of crucifers); Aleyrodes proletella (cabbage whitefly); Athalia rosae (cabbage leaf sawfly); Autographa gamma (silver-Y moth); Autographa nigrisigna (beet worm); Beet western yellows virus (turnip (mild) yellows); Brevicoryne brassicae (cabbage aphid); Cabbage leaf curl virus; Candidatus Phytoplasma asteris (yellow disease phytoplasmas); Cauliflower mosaic virus (cauliflower mosaic); Chamomilla recutita (common chamomile); Chenopodium album (fat hen); Chenopodium murale (nettleleaf goosefoot); Contarinia nasturtii (swede midge); Cornu aspersum (common garden snail); Crocidolomia pavonana (large cabbage-heart caterpillar); Echinochloa crus-galli (barnyard grass); Evergestis rimosalis (cross-striped cabbageworm); Frankliniella occidentalis (western flower thrips); Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. conglutinans (cabbage fusarium wilt); Galinsoga parviflora (gallant soldier); Gibberella avenacea (Fusarium blight); Hadula trifolii (clover cutworm); Hellula undalis (cabbage webworm); Heterodera cruciferae; Hyaloperonospora parasitica (downy mildew); Leptosphaeria biglobosa; Leptosphaeria maculans (stem canker); Liriomyza brassicae (serpentine leafminer); Liriomyza bryoniae (tomato leaf miner); Lolium temulentum (darnel); Longidorus (longidorids); Mamestra brassicae (cabbage moth); Meloidogyne artiellia; Meloidogyne ethiopica (Root-knot nematode); Microtheca ochroloma (yellowmargined leaf beetle); Murgantia histrionica (harlequin bug); Mycosphaerella brassicicola (cabbage ring-spot); Orobanche (broomrape); Paratrichodorus porosus; Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. carotovorum (bacterial root rot of sweet potato); Peridroma saucia (pearly underwing moth); Phyllotreta albionica (cabbage flea beetle); Phyllotreta chotanica (striped flea beetle); Phyllotreta cruciferae (crucifer flea beetle); Phyllotreta striolata (cabbage flea beetle); Phytophthora megasperma (root rot); Pieris brassicae (large cabbage white); Pieris napi (green-veined white butterfly); Pieris rapae (cabbage white butterfly); Plasmodiophora brassicae (club root); Plutella xylostella (diamondback moth); Pontia daplidice; Pratylenchus penetrans (nematode, northern root lesion); Pratylenchus vulnus (walnut root lesion nematode); Pseudomonas marginalis pv. marginalis (lettuce marginal leaf blight); Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola (bacterial: cabbage leaf spot); Pythium aphanidermatum (damping-off); Pythium ultimum (black-leg of seedlings); Rotylenchulus reniformis (reniform nematode); Sclerotinia sclerotiorum (cottony soft rot); Senecio vulgaris; Solenopsis geminata (tropical fire ant); Spodoptera litura (taro caterpillar); Thanatephorus cucumeris (many names, depending on host); Thrips tabaci (onion thrips); Thysanoplusia orichalcea (slender burnished brass moth); Trichodorus (stubby root nematodes); Trichodorus primitivus; Trichoplusia ni (cabbage looper); Turnip mosaic virus (cabbage A virus mosaic); Xanthomonas campestris (black rot of crucifers); Xanthomonas campestris pv. aberrans (leafspot of cauliflower.); Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris (black rot); Xanthomonas campestris pv. raphani (leafspot.)

Minor host of:

Abutilon theophrasti (velvet leaf); Alternaria dauci (leaf blight of carrot); Alternaria japonica (pod spot of radish); Athelia rolfsii (sclerotium rot); Bagrada hilaris (painted bug); Belonolaimus longicaudatus (sting nematode); Ceutorhynchus obstrictus (cabbage seed pod weevil); Chalara elegans (black root rot); Chinavia hilaris (green stink bug); Chrysodeixis chalcites (golden twin-spot moth); Colletotrichum dematium (leaf spot); Curvularia (black kernel); Delia platura (bean seed fly); Dickeya chrysanthemi (bacterial wilt of chrysanthemum and other ornamentals); Epitrix cucumeris (potato flea beetle); Erysiphe cruciferarum (powdery mildew of crucifers); Gryllotalpa africana (african mole cricket); Helicotylenchus multicinctus (banana spiral nematode); Helicoverpa zea (American cotton bollworm); Homona coffearia (tea tortrix); Hoplolaimus indicus (lance nematode); Longidorus elongatus (needle nematode); Lygus lineolaris (tarnished plant bug); Melanoplus bivittatus (twostriped grasshopper); Meloidogyne hapla (root knot nematode); Meloidogyne izalcoensis; Pectobacterium atrosepticum (potato blackleg disease); Pectobacterium carotovorum subsp. odoriferum; Pectobacterium wasabiae; Phytophthora porri (white tip of leek); Plectosphaerella cucumerina; Pseudomonas cichorii (bacterial blight of endive); Pseudomonas syringae pv. alisalensis; Pseudomonas viridiflava (bacterial leaf blight of tomato (USA)); Pythium debaryanum (damping-off); Pythium myriotylum (brown rot of groundnut); Spodoptera eridania (southern armyworm); Spodoptera exempta (black armyworm); Spodoptera exigua (beet armyworm); Spodoptera frugiperda (fall armyworm); Spodoptera littoralis (cotton leafworm); Theba pisana (white garden snail); Thrips angusticeps (field thrips); Xestia c-nigrum (spotted cutworm)

Wild host of:

Sweet potato feathery mottle virus (internal cork disease of sweet potato)

Associated with (not a host):

Bacillus mycoides; Bacillus polymyxa (bacterial: tomato seedling blight); Bacillus pumilus; Erynia neoaphidis (parasite of aphids); Hypocrea rufa (green mould of narcissus); Meloidogyne graminicola (rice root knot nematode); Mycosphaerella tassiana (antagonist of Botrytis cinerea); Pseudomonas fluorescens (pink eye: potato); Serratia liquefaciens (insect pathogen (mainly orthopterans)); Serratia plymuthica; Solenopsis invicta (red imported fire ant); Trichoderma harzianum (hyperparasite of Rhizoctonia solani)

Host of (source - data mining):

Aclypea opaca (carrion, beetle, beet); Agriotes lineatus (wireworm); Alternaria alternata (alternaria leaf spot); Anagrapha falcifera (celery looper); Ascia monuste (gulf white cabbage worm); Ascia monuste orseis; Barypeithes pellucidus (juniper root weevil); Botryotinia fuckeliana (grey mould-rot); Ceutorhynchus pallidactylus (cabbage stem weevil); Ceutorhynchus pleurostigma (turnip gall weevil); Chaetocnema indica; Chrysodeixis agnata (three-spotted plusia); Copitarsia consueta; Cydia nigricana (pea moth); Delia florilega (turnip maggot); Dorylus orientalis (oriental army ant); Empoasca; Evergestis forficalis (crucifer, caterpillar); Frankliniella; Fusarium oxysporum (basal rot); Gibberella intricans (damping-off of safflower); Hellula phidilealis (cabbage budworm); Lacanobia oleracea (bright-line brown-eye moth); Lacanobia suasa; Leptophobia aripa; Limothrips cerealium (corn, thrips); Limothrips denticornis (barley thrips); Mycosphaerella; Ochropleura flammatra (Indian cutworm); Pemphigus populitransversus (poplar petiolegall aphid); Phlogophora meticulosa (angle shades moth); Phyllotreta (flea beetles); Phyllotreta atra (cabbage flea beetle); Phyllotreta flexuosa; Phyllotreta nemorum (striped flea beetle); Phyllotreta vittula (barley flea beetle); Phytophthora drechsleri (watermelon fruit rot); Pieris rapae crucivora; Pratylenchus neglectus (nematode, California meadow); Spilarctia obliqua (common hairy caterpillar); Spodoptera albula (Costa Rican armyworm)

Uses List

Top of page

Animal feed, fodder, forage

  • Fodder/animal feed

Human food and beverage

  • Vegetable

Medicinal, pharmaceutical

  • Traditional/folklore